Tessa Virtue, Scott Moir, despite trip, win world title in comeback season

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Canadians Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir capped an undefeated and record-breaking comeback season, winning their third world ice dance title and first since 2012 on Saturday.

Even with Moir tripping during their free dance, they totaled 198.62 points, the highest score of all time. They topped the two-time defending world champions, training partners Gabriella Papadakis and Guillaume Cizeron of France, by 2.58 points.

“[Virtue] held my butt up today,” Moir said afterward.

Americans Maia Shibutani and Alex Shibutani took bronze, 13.44 points behind Virtue and Moir, the 2010 Olympic gold medalists and 2014 Olympic silver medalists.

The Shibutani siblings, silver medalists a year ago, moved up from fourth after the short dance. They snagged the lone U.S. medal in any event at worlds.

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Americans Madison Hubbell and Zachary Donohue were in position for their first world medal going into the free dance, but Donohue fell during their twizzles. They dropped from third to ninth.

As for Virtue and Moir, they were saved by a 5.54-point lead from Friday’s short dance. Immediately before they took the ice Saturday, Papadakis and Cizeron posted the highest free dance score of all time, leaving crowd members in tears.

“It’s not a lot of fun to come out after Gabby and Guillaume,” Moir said.

After two years away from competition, Virtue and Moir completed an undefeated season in which they recorded the four highest total scores of all time in their last four international events. That made Moir’s trip during a step sequence so shocking, causing an audible crowd gasp as he put one hand down on the ice to keep from falling down completely.

The other U.S. couple, Madison Chock and Evan Bates, finished seventh after taking silver in 2015 and bronze in 2016.

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Ice Dance Results
Gold: Tessa Virtue/Scott Moir (CAN) — 198.62

Silver: Gabriella Papadakis/Guillaume Cizeron (FRA) — 196.04
Bronze: Maia Shibutani/Alex Shibutani (USA) — 185.18
7. Madison Chock/Evan Bates (USA) — 182.04
9. Madison Hubbell/Zachary Donohue (USA) — 177.70

First Olympic women’s aerials champion Cheryazova dies at 50

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MOSCOW (AP) Lina Cheryazova, the first woman to win an Olympic aerials skiing gold medal, has died. She was 50.

Officials in the Russian city of Novosibirsk, where Cheryazova was living for the last two decades, said she died “following a lengthy illness,” without giving further details.

Competing for Uzbekistan, Cheryazova won gold with a triple flip when aerials skiing debuted on the Olympic program in 1994 in Lillehammer.

Shortly after winning, she learned her mother died three weeks before.

Cheryazova’s career was derailed later that year when she suffered a serious head injury while training in the United States, and spent days in a coma. She retired after failing to qualify for the 1998 Winter Olympics.

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Clare Egan notches first World Cup podium in biathlon season finale

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In the final biathlon event of the 2018-19 season, American Clare Egan recorded her first career World Cup podium finish, placing third in the mass start in Oslo, Norway. She hit 19 of 20 targets and crossed the finish line 10.4 seconds behind winner Hanna Oberg of Sweden. Norway’s Tiril Eckhoff finished second.

Egan, 31, made her Olympic debut at the 2018 PyeongChang Games, but considered retiring from biathlon at the end of the last season. “I decided that I wanted to do one more year, just for fun, just to see how much I could learn and how good a biathlete I could become,” Egan said in a U.S. Biathlon press release.

Her decision to continue has paid off: since the start of the 2018-19 season, Egan has posted the top eight finishes of her career (including three top-10 results). She concludes the season ranked 18th in the overall World Cup standings.

“I skied much faster this year than I have in the past and I think that was due to finally finding a good balance in my training, between working hard and resting. I did not train more, but the quality was much higher. I’m very excited for the next season,” Egan told U.S. Biathlon.