Nancy Kerrigan details eating issues before 1994 Olympics

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Nancy Kerrigan is making a documentary about eating disorders in sports, and she has her own story to tell on the subject.

“A lot of times people see it as something that they can control, but, frankly, the eating disorder starts to control you,” Kerrigan said in a People magazine video interview published Wednesday. “I mean, that happened to me, to some degree, after I was attacked [before the 1994 U.S. Figure Skating Championships]. I’m being followed around by cars and the media and everything. I didn’t realize what I was doing. I mean, I lost a whole bunch of weight.”

Kerrigan was clubbed on the leg in an attack orchestrated by the ex-husband of American rival Tonya Harding. She came back to win silver at the Lillehammer Olympics seven weeks later.

Kerrigan retired from competitive skating after those Winter Games, started a family with three kids and is currently competing on “Dancing with the Stars.” She is also the executive producer of an upcoming documentary, “Why Don’t You Lose 5 Pounds?” about athletes’ eating disorders.

Kerrigan said she didn’t eat enough in the period between her attack and competing in Lillehammer.

“It was so busy that I didn’t actually realize I wasn’t eating for quite some time, and then my weight started dropping because I couldn’t skate because I couldn’t walk,” she said in a radio interview last year. “So I was training in the water. In doing so, you lose and burn so much more than even when you’re training on land that my weight started dropping off, and I wasn’t eating enough to sustain how much work I was doing.”

Kerrigan said those around her, including her mom, told her that she looked too thin and needed to eat more. She received the most support from her then-manager and future husband, Jerry Solomon.

Solomon ate meals with Kerrigan at the Olympics and encouraged her to eat two more bites, according to People.

“I was afraid, after all I had been through, I didn’t want someone else to get in the way of what I worked so hard for, and I didn’t want to get in the way,” Kerrigan said in the 2016 radio interview. “So I started to eat a little bit more so I wouldn’t be weak at the time of the championships.”

Kerrigan said she avoided food because it was one of the few things in her life she could control during the tumultuous time, according to People.

“I just started shrinking,” she said, according to the magazine. “I’d put on makeup differently to sort of hide that I was wasting away. Strangers would say, ‘Oh, that’s not enough food on your plate.'”

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Olympian Derrick Mein ends U.S. men’s trap drought at shotgun worlds

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Tokyo Olympian Derrick Mein became the first U.S. male shooter to win a world title in the trap event since 1966, prevailing at the world shotgun championships in Osijek, Croatia, on Wednesday.

Mein, who grew up on a small farm in Southeast Kansas, hunting deer and quail, nearly squandered a place in the final when he missed his last three shots in the semifinal round after hitting his first 22. He rallied in a sudden-death shoot-off for the last spot in the final by hitting all five of his targets.

He hit 33 of 34 targets in the final to win by two over Brit Nathan Hales with one round to spare.

The last U.S. man to win an Olympic trap title was Donald Haldeman in 1976.

Mein, 37, was 24th in his Olympic debut in Tokyo (and placed 13th with Kayle Browning in the mixed-gender team event).

The U.S. swept the Tokyo golds in the other shotgun event — skeet — with Vincent Hancock and Amber English. Browning took silver in women’s trap.

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Mo Farah withdraws before London Marathon

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British track legend Mo Farah withdrew before Sunday’s London Marathon, citing a right hip injury before what would have been his first 26.2-mile race in nearly two years.

Farah, who swept the 2012 and 2016 Olympic track titles at 5000m and 10,000m, said he hoped “to be back out there” next April, when the London Marathon returns to its traditional month after COVID moved it to the fall for three consecutive years. Farah turns 40 on March 23.

“I’ve been training really hard over the past few months and I’d got myself back into good shape and was feeling pretty optimistic about being able to put in a good performance,” in London, Farah said in a press release. “However, over the past 10 days I’ve been feeling pain and tightness in my right hip. I’ve had extensive physio and treatment and done everything I can to be on the start line, but it hasn’t improved enough to compete on Sunday.”

Farah switched from the track to the marathon after the 2017 World Championships and won the 2018 Chicago Marathon in a then-European record time of 2:05:11. Belgium’s Bashir Abdi now holds the record at 2:03:36.

Farah returned to the track in a failed bid to qualify for the Tokyo Olympics, then shifted back to the roads.

Sunday’s London Marathon men’s race is headlined by Ethiopians Kenenisa Bekele and Birhanu Legese, the second- and third-fastest marathoners in history.

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