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WADA eyes fast-tracked power to sanction cheating countries, sports

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MONTREAL (AP) — After Olympic officials ignored their advice to suspend Russia from the Rio Games, World Anti-Doping Agency leaders are looking to fast-track new rules that could prevent a similar scenario for future Games.

WADA’s foundation board approved a plan Thursday that could give the agency new powers to suspend a country’s Olympic federation for egregious anti-doping violations. If enacted at the next board meeting, the rules would go on the books during the Olympics next February, though they would come into play too late for the PyeongChang Winter Games.

Still, for WADA, it’s an unusually urgent move, one that was sparked by the Russian doping scandal and the International Olympic Committee’s decision to disregard WADA’s recommendation that the entire Russian Olympic team be banned from Rio.

If the changes are approved, the IOC, along with national Olympic committees and anti-doping agencies, would have to adhere to a new system of sanctions, subject to appeals. The guidelines call for athletes from a non-compliant country to be ineligible if that country’s Olympic committee or anti-doping agency make a deliberate attempt to circumvent anti-doping rules.

This is the sort of change that would normally wait until the next rewriting of the WADA code, which would go into effect in 2021. Instead, the board heeded compliance review committee chairman Jonathan Taylor’s call for a quick review and a vote on the new rules at the November board meeting. From there, WADA regulations call for a three-month wait until the rules go on the books.

“It can get done. It’s not rocket science,” said Dick Pound, the Canadian member of the IOC and WADA, whose report on doping corruption inside the Russian track team led that sport’s international federation to suspend the team from Rio.

The IOC decision in Rio thrust the fate of Russian athletes into the hands of leaders of the individual sports federations, which allowed 271 of them to participate.

With the Winter Games nine months away, the IOC is in the middle of two investigations based on information from a report by Richard McLaren. McLaren’ report, delivered in December, found evidence of wide-scale doping corruption in Russia, including switching of drug-tainted urine samples with clean ones at the Sochi Winter Games.

It appears any decision about Russia’s eligibility for PyeongChang will be made under current rules.

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MORE: Another Russian medal from 2008 Olympics stripped

Bolt’s London Olympic spikes stolen

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DERBY, England (AP) A signed pair of running shoes worn by eight-time Olympic gold medalist Usain Bolt has been stolen from an address in Linton, Derbyshire.

The white, blue and red spikes were used by the Jamaican great in a 100 meters heat at the 2012 Games, Derbyshire Police said.

“The spikes are part of an extensive collection that I have built-up over the last 10 years,” the victim said. “There are only four or five pairs of spikes that have been signed from the London 2012 Olympics, they are absolutely irreplaceable.”

The victim did not want to be named.

A 35-year-old man has been charged in connection with the theft. The shoes have yet to be recovered.

Bolt, 31, who retired after the 2017 world championships in London, won the 100m, 200m and 4x100m relay titles at the 2008, 2012 and 2016 Olympics, although he later lost the 2008 relay gold after a team-mate was disqualified for doping.

Anne Donovan, basketball Hall of Famer, gold medalist, dies at 56

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Anne Donovan, a Hall of Fame basketball player and Olympic gold medalist, has died of heart failure at age 56.

Donovan coached the Storm to a 2004 WNBA title.

“While it is extremely difficult to express how devastating it is to lose Anne, our family remains so very grateful to have been blessed with such a wonderful human being,” Donovan’s family said in a statement, according to reports. “Anne touched many lives as a daughter, sister, aunt, friend and coach.

Donovan, a 6-foot-8 center, made the 1980 U.S. Olympic team (as its youngest player after her freshman year at Old Dominion) that ended up missing the Moscow Games due to the U.S. boycott.

She then earned gold with the U.S. in 1984 and 1988, being the oldest player on the latter team at 26. She was inducted as a player into the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame in 1995 and into the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame in 1999.

Donovan later was an assistant coach for the 2004 Olympic champion team and head coach for the 2008 Beijing team that took gold. She also was the first female head coach of a WNBA champion team with the Storm in 2004.

“USA Basketball mourns the passing of Anne Donovan,” USA Basketball said in a statement. “She played for her first USA Basketball team in 1977 and during her Hall of Fame, 31-year USA career, she was a member of five U.S. Olympic teams and four USA World Championship teams as an athlete and coach, culminating in leading the 2008 U.S. Olympic Team to gold as our head coach in Beijing. She used to say she bled red, white and blue. As much as we remember her accomplishments in the game, we mourn a great friend who will be greatly missed.”