Alberto Salazar responds to USADA investigation reports

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Track coach Alberto Salazar again denied breaking anti-doping rules following more reports of details from an ongoing U.S. Anti-Doping Agency investigation into Salazar and his Nike Oregon Project program.

“As I have noted repeatedly, the successes my athletes have achieved are through hard work and dedication,” Salazar wrote in an email Wednesday, according to the Oregonian. “I believe in a clean sport and a methodical, dedicated, approach to training. The Oregon Project will never permit doping and all Oregon Project athletes are required to comply with the WADA [World Anti-Doping Agency] Code and IAAF Rules.”

Earlier this week, The New York Times reported that the USADA investigation determined then-Nike Oregon Project runner Dathan Ritzenhein “likely” received an infusion of the substance L-carnitine above the legal dosage limit in December 2011.

An interim USADA report published by Flotrack backed the Times report regarding Ritzenhein while saying its findings were “subject to change” at “this preliminary stage” of the investigation. It also agreed with previous reports that other Salazar-coached athletes received L-carnitine infusions and said it was “highly likely” they were above the legal limit of 50 milliliters per six-hour period.

“USADA’s conjecture regarding the L-carnitine injections is simply wrong,” Salazar wrote Wednesday, according to the Oregonian. “Evidence has been submitted to USADA disproving their unsupported assumptions.”

Salazar said the Nike Oregon Project has “nothing to hide.”

“I’ve done more than any coach to continuously disprove false allegations where no violation has occurred,” he wrote. “I fully cooperated, voluntarily answered USADA’s questions under oath and provided thousands of documents.”

The three-time Olympian Ritzenhein, who left Salazar’s group in 2014, said he “complied with all WADA rules, including my use of L-carnitine,” in a reported 2015 statement.

At least seven former athletes and staff members of Salazar’s Nike Oregon Project have spoken with USADA, some alleging that Salazar violated medical and anti-doping rules with his athletes, according to June 2015 reports.

Salazar called allegations of cheating from his former athletes and staff “demonstrably false” in an 11,000-word response three weeks after the June 2015 reports.

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