IOC pushes plan to award 2024, 2028 Olympics to LA, Paris

Los Angeles 2024
LA 2024
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Los Angeles and Paris should split the 2024 and 2028 Olympics, the IOC executive board recommended Friday.

Which city gets 2024 and which gets 2028 is still to be decided.

IOC members will vote on ratifying a double-awarding proposal in July. If it’s ratified, Los Angeles will end the U.S.’ longest drought between hosting Olympics since 1960.

IOC president Thomas Bach said that, ideally, LA, Paris and the IOC would come to an agreement that produces “no losers” for 2024 and 2028.

IOC members could also take an historic double vote at a session in Lima, Peru, on Sept. 13 to choose which city gets 2024 and which gets 2028.

The IOC recommendation was made on the strength of the LA and Paris bids for 2024. There are no formal bids for 2028 yet.

“We have two big birds in our hands, and I cannot see any small bird on the roof,” Bach said when asked about potentially excluding a formal 2028 Olympic bidding process. “There may be some flying over the roof and making some noise, but none of them has landed on the roof.”

It would mark the first time two Olympic hosts are determined at once since 1921, when the 1924 Paris and 1928 Amsterdam Games were awarded, according to Olympstats.com.

Paris bid co-chief Tony Estanguet previously said the French bid would not accept the 2028 Olympics. LA is open to 2028. Bach would not confirm or deny Paris’ ultimatum on Friday.

“We believe that the IOC is acting in the best interests of the Olympic Movement and the future of the Games in taking these steps,” Paris 2024 said in a statement, while not commenting on a 2028 possibility.

Los Angeles would become the first U.S. Olympic host city since Salt Lake City held the 2002 Winter Games and Atlanta had the 1996 Summer Games. The U.S. went 28 years between Los Angeles 1932 and the 1960 Squaw Valley Winter Games.

Los Angeles and Paris would join London as the only cities to host three Olympics. Los Angeles hosted in 1932 and 1984. Paris hosted in 1900 and 1924.

One of the major selling points of Paris’ 2024 bid has been marking the centennial of its 1924 Games.

The 2024 Olympic bid process included dropouts from Boston, Hamburg, Rome and Budapest.

East Asian nations will host the next three Olympics — PyeongChang in 2018, Tokyo in 2020 and Beijing in 2022.

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MORE: LA Olympic bid venues include iconic sites

Joan Benoit Samuelson, Olympic marathon champ in 1984, runs London Marathon at 65

Joan Benoit Samuelson
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Joan Benoit Samuelson, the first Olympic women’s marathon champion in 1984, ran her first 26.2-mile race in three years at Sunday’s London Marathon and won her age group.

Benoit Samuelson, 65, clocked 3 hours, 20 minutes, 20 seconds to top the women’s 65-69 age group by 7 minutes, 52 seconds. She took pleasure in being joined in the race by daughter Abby, who crossed in 2:58:19.

“She may have beaten me with my replacement knee, but everybody said I wouldn’t do it! I will never say never,” Benoit Samuelson said, according to race organizers. “I am a grandmother now to Charlotte, and it’s my goal to run 5K with her.”

LONDON MARATHON: Results

Benoit Samuelson raced the 1987 Boston Marathon while three months pregnant with Abby. Before that, she won the first Olympic women’s marathon at the 1984 Los Angeles Games, plus the Boston Marathon in 1979 and 1983 and the Chicago Marathon in 1985.

Her personal best — 2:21:21 — still holds up. She ranks sixth in U.S. women’s history.

Benoit Samuelson plans to race the Tokyo Marathon to complete her set of doing all six annual World Marathon Majors. The others are Berlin, Boston, Chicago and New York City.

“I’m happy to finish this race and make it to Tokyo, but I did it today on a wing and a prayer,” she said, according to organizers. “I’m blessed to have longevity in this sport. It doesn’t owe me anything, but I feel I owe my sport.”

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Kenenisa Bekele still eyes Eliud Kipchoge’s marathon world record, but a duel must wait

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LONDON — Kenenisa Bekele made headlines last week by declaring “of course I am the best” long distance runner ever. But the Ethiopian was fifth-best at Sunday’s London Marathon, finishing 74 seconds behind Kenya’s Amos Kipruto.

Bekele, 40, clocked 2:05:53, the fastest-ever marathon by a runner 40 years or older. He was with the lead pack until being dropped in the 21st mile.

But Bekele estimated he could have run 90 to 120 seconds faster had he not missed parts of six weeks of training with hip and joint injuries.

“I expect better even if the preparation is short,” he said. “I know my talent and I know my capacity, but really I couldn’t achieve what I expect.”

Bekele is the second-fastest marathoner in history behind Kenya’s Eliud Kipchoge, who broke his own world record by clocking 2:01:09 at the Berlin Marathon last week.

“I am happy when I see Eliud Kipchoge run that time,” Bekele said. “It motivates all athletes who really expect to do the same thing.”

LONDON MARATHON: Results

Bekele’s best time was within two seconds of Kipchoge’s previous world record (2:01:39). He described breaking Kipchoge’s new mark as the “main goal” for the rest of his career.

“Yes, I hope, one day it will happen, of course,” Bekele said. “With good preparation, I don’t know when, but we will see one more time.”

Nobody has won more London Marathons than Kipchoge, a four-time champion who set the course record (2:02:37) in 2019. But the two-time Olympic marathon champion did not run this year in London, as elite marathoners typically choose to enter one race each spring and fall.

Bekele does not know which race he will enter in the spring. But it will not be against Kipchoge.

“I need to show something first,” Bekele said. “I need to run a fast time. I have to check myself. This is not enough.”

Kipchoge will try to become the first runner to win three Olympic marathon titles at the Paris Games. Bekele, who will be 42 in 2024, has not committed to trying to qualify for the Ethiopian team.

“There’s a long time to go before Paris,” Bekele said. “At this moment I am not decided. I have to show something.”

So who is the greatest long distance runner ever?

Bekele can make a strong case on the track:

Bekele
Four Olympic medals (three gold)
Six World Championship medals (five gold)
Former 5000m and 10,000m world-record holder

Kipchoge
Two Olympic medals
Two World Championship medals (one gold)

But Kipchoge can make a strong case on the pavement:

Bekele
Second-fastest marathoner in history
Two World Marathon Major victories

Kipchoge
Four of the five best marathon times in history
Two-time Olympic marathon champion
12 World Marathon Major victories

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