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Olympic taekwondo star accused of sexual abuse, report says

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Two brothers under investigation for sexual misconduct were allowed to take part in the Rio Olympics last summer, according to a report.

USA Today reported that USA Taekwondo began investigating claims against Steven and Jean Lopez more than two years ago after multiple women said the brothers sexually assaulted them.

The organizing body consulted with the U.S. Olympic Committee and agreed to halt the probe before the Olympics, according to USA Today. That meant Steven Lopez – a 38-year-old, three-time Olympic medalist – and Jean, at 43 a veteran coach, could participate.

The newspaper obtained a March 22 letter from investigating attorney Donald Alperstein to one of the women in which he said he notified the FBI “because so much of the misconduct occurred in multiple jurisdictions” and added that he “felt the Lopez brothers needed to be removed from the sport.”

Both brothers denied sexual assault allegations made by four women to the newspaper and to investigators.

“I’ve never been inappropriate with anyone,” Jean Lopez said.

Mandy Meloon, a former taekwondo participant who says Jean Lopez molested her in 1997 when she was 16, said an FBI agent interviewed her for roughly two hours on May 19. She said she provided names of other women who say they were abused by the Lopez brothers and others in the sport.

Heidi Gilbert, another former athlete, told the newspaper that Jean Lopez drugged and sexually assaulted her. She said she did not contact law enforcement officials because “they’re not going to believe me, nothing is going to happen.” She said she did detail the allegations to investigators for USA Taekwondo and the U.S. Center for SafeSport.

Another woman, identified only as a former member of the junior national team, said she was drugged three times and that Steven Lopez once had sex with her while she was unconscious. She also notified USA Taekwondo and SafeSport but not law enforcement.

The Associated Press doesn’t typically name victims of sex abuse, but Meloon and Gilbert made their accusations publicly.

USOC spokesman Patrick Sandusky said in a statement provided to the newspaper that “preventing and responding to sexual abuse is something we take incredibly seriously” and is why it founded SafeSport, which operates independently from the USOC. The organizing body declined to specifically address questions about the Lopez brothers and the investigation.

“When the center opened in March, we appropriately submitted the taekwondo matter for its review, and to comment publicly in the midst of the center’s investigation would be inappropriate,” Sandusky said.

David Rudisha escapes car crash ‘well and unhurt’

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David Rudisha, a two-time Olympic champion and world record holder at 800m, is “well and unhurt” after a car accident in his native Kenya, according to his Facebook account.

Kenyan media reported that one of Rudisha’s tires burst on Saturday night, leading his car to collide with a bus, and he was treated for minor injuries at a hospital.

Rudisha, 30, last raced July 4, 2017, missing extended time with a quad muscle strain and back problems. His manager said last week that Rudisha will miss next month’s world championships.

Rudisha owns the three fastest times in history, including the world record 1:40.91 set in an epic 2012 Olympic final.

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Tokyo Paralympic medals unveiled with historic Braille design, indentations

Tokyo Paralympic Medals
Tokyo 2020
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The Tokyo Paralympic medals, which like the Olympic medals are created in part with metals from recycled cell phones and other small electronics, were unveiled on Sunday, one year out from the Opening Ceremony.

In a first for the Paralympics, each medal has one to three indentation(s) on its side to distinguish its color by touch — one for gold, two silver and three for bronze. Braille letters also spell out “Tokyo 2020” on each medal’s face.

For Rio, different amounts of tiny steel balls were put inside the medals based on their color, so that when shaken they would make distinct sounds. Visually impaired athletes could shake the medals next to their ears to determine the color.

More on the design from Tokyo 2020:

The design is centered around the motif of a traditional Japanese fan, depicting the Paralympic Games as the source of a fresh new wind refreshing the world as well as a shared experience connecting diverse hearts and minds. The kaname, or pivot point, holds all parts of the fan together; here it represents Para athletes bringing people together regardless of nationality or ethnicity. Motifs on the leaves of the fan depict the vitality of people’s hearts and symbolize Japan’s captivating and life-giving natural environment in the form of rocks, flowers, wood, leaves, and water. These are applied with a variety of techniques, producing a textured surface that makes the medals compelling to touch.

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Tokyo Paralympic Medals

Tokyo Paralympic Medals