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Steven Holcomb had pills, alcohol in system at death

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Olympic bobsled champion Steven Holcomb had prescription sleeping pills and alcohol in his system when he was found dead last month, according to a toxicology report provided to his family and USA Bobsled and Skeleton.

Holcomb’s blood-alcohol level was found to be 0.188, well above the threshold for intoxication. He also had more than the typical dosage of the sleeping aid Lunesta in his system, and the report indicated that combination was fatal for the bobsledder who was found in his bed at the Olympic Training Center in Lake Placid, N.Y., on May 6.

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An initial autopsy last month showed that fluid in Holcomb’s lungs was a significant factor in his death, but no precise cause of death was revealed pending the toxicology report.

“We hold our memories of him close and are so proud of him, not only as an athlete but also as a person,” the Holcomb family said in a statement to USA Bobsled and Skeleton.

The investigation by Essex County Coroner Francis Whitelaw is now complete, according to U.S. bobsled officials. But it remains unclear if Whitelaw will ever release a final report, or if his process of putting that together was even completed. Whitelaw said Monday that he was prohibited from saying anything new pertaining to the slider’s death because Holcomb’s family threatened to sue.

Whitelaw shared the toxicology report with Holcomb’s family, as well as a draft of his planned press release to seek feedback and ensure accuracy. Holcomb’s family felt the draft “included speculation beyond the scope of the toxicology report and autopsy findings” and requested through an attorney that the release be withheld.

“Anyone who knew Steven knew what a private person he was despite being a public figure,” his family said. “Our intentions were to continue to respect his privacy, even in death.”

E. Stewart Jones, an attorney retained by the Holcomb family for the autopsy-release matter, said making the report public without a court order or permission of the family would be a violation of county and state law.

“The family wants to move forward. They want Steven to rest in peace and they want to be in peace,” Jones said.

The New York State Police also plan to release a report about Holcomb’s death, though what that will contain and when it is coming remain unknown.

The 37-year-old Holcomb was a three-time Olympic medalist, including a four-man gold medal for the U.S. at the 2010 Vancouver Games. He won two bronzes at the Sochi Games in 2014, and was a virtual lock to make his fourth Olympic appearance at PyeongChang next winter.

“Steven’s passing is a tragedy and we are devastated to lose him,” the Holcomb family said. “Steven was an amazing son and brother who was loved and cherished by his family, his friends, the bobsled community and all the communities he touched around the world.”

He was the biggest star USA Bobsled had, with 60 World Cup and 10 world championship medals in his collection. He spoke openly of his past battles with depression — including a suicide attempt — but also had many plans for the coming months, including sponsor appearances, a planned surprise visit to his mother and training sessions with U.S. teammates in Tennessee.

No other probes into Holcomb’s death are planned, his family said.

“I’m not a religious person, but spiritual, and I beg of the universe that this puts Steven’s passing to rest in a graceful and positive way,” said Stephanie Peterson, Holcomb’s sister.

His team is ready to start moving on as well. A team camp is set to begin later this month, and Holcomb will be inducted into the USABS Hall of Fame on July 1. U.S. officials waived the customary 10-year waiting period before former athletes are eligible for enshrinement.

“We’re still in shock and struggling to come to terms with our loss,” USABS CEO Darrin Steele said. “The sliding community is a tight-knit family, and we lost one of our brothers. The outpouring of support from around the world has helped us begin the process of healing, but his absence will be felt for years to come.”

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MORE: ‘Our champion:’ Bobsledder Steven Holcomb’s life celebrated

Caeleb Dressel takes gold, silver at short course worlds as rival DQed

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Caeleb Dressel earned his second individual silver medal in as many events at short-course worlds, while one of his top rivals was disqualified in Friday’s 50m freestyle final in Hangzhou, China.

Dressel, who tied Michael Phelps‘ record with seven gold medals at 2017 Worlds in the larger, Olympic-size pool, finished second to Russian Vladimir Morozov in Friday’s 50m free. Morozov clocked 20.33 seconds — just .07 off the world record — while Dressel touched in 20.54.

Another medal favorite, Great Britain’s Ben Proud, originally finished third but was disqualified for moving on the starting block too early.

“I twitched on the racing block, something I’ve done before, something I’m not too happy with about myself,” Proud said, according to FINA.

Dressel also led off the U.S.’ winning 4x50m free relay on Friday, breaking his American record in the 50m free. Dressel has four golds (all in relays) and two silvers with two days left at the meet. He also finished second in Thursday’s 100m butterfly to South African Chad le Clos.

Short-course worlds are held in even years in 25-meter pools rather than 50-meter pools used at the Olympics. U.S. Olympic champions Katie LedeckySimone Manuel and Lilly King are among those not competing this week.

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In other events Friday, Hungarian Katinka Hosszu earned her third individual title of the week, this one in the 100m individual medley. Hosszu swept the IMs at the Rio Olympics and the last three world championships in an Olympic-size pool.

Ledecky rival Ariarne Titmus of Australia broke Chinese Wang Jianjiahe‘s world record in the 400m freestyle, relegating the 16-year-old Wang to silver.

American Ryan Murphy, who swept the Olympic 100m and 200m backstrokes, took silver in the 50m back, .05 behind Russian rival Yevgeny Rylov.

Another American, Kelsi Dahlia, picked up her second individual butterfly medal of the week, taking bronze in the 50m fly won by Dutchwoman Ranomi Kromowidjojo.

Worlds continue Saturday, with finals streaming live on OlympicChannel.com and the Olympic Channel app.

MORE: Olympic breaststroke champion retires

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Watch Colin Kaepernick introduce Tommie Smith, John Carlos at USATF Night of Legends

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Twenty-four members of the 1968 U.S. Olympic track and field team appeared at the USATF Night of Legends. Two in particular received a standing ovation before an award presentation.

Tommie Smith and John Carlos, who earned 200m gold and bronze medals and then raised their black-gloved fists on the medal stand, were introduced via video by quarterback Colin Kaepernick, a fellow athlete fighting for social justice.

“Fifty years ago, these two men shook the world,” Kaepernick said in the video. “Their selfless and courageous act had an impact on the heart and mind of millions and have been a huge inspiration to me, personally. They laid the foundation not only for what the conscience of an athlete should look like, but also the world.”

Smith and Carlos then walked on stage at the Night of Legends, which honored the top U.S. athletes and performances of 2018, along with Hall of Fame inductees. NBCSN will air the event on Saturday at 11 p.m. ET.

They presented the Jesse Owens Award, which goes annually to the top U.S. male athlete. Fellow 200m sprinter Noah Lyles earned the honor.

“If he would give you and I a two-day head start, I think we could beat him in the 200m,” Carlos joked to Smith. “We’ve got to lean,” Smith replied.

Lyles, 21, joined Usain Bolt as the only men to break 19.7 seconds in the 200m four times in one year. His best time — 19.65 — was the world’s fastest since Bolt’s last world title in 2015. Lyles also became the youngest U.S. men’s 100m champion in 34 years. He’s the second-youngest person to earn USATF Athlete of the Year after Allyson Felix.

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MORE: John Carlos, Tommie Smith remember 1968 Olympics on 50th anniversary