Elizabeth Beisel, after DQ, makes one more world team before retirement

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Elizabeth Beisel swam at her first world championships in 2007 at age 14. She’s expected to make this year’s world championships her last at age 24.

The three-time Olympian made her sixth straight world team by finishing second in the 400m individual medley at the USA Swimming Nationals, part of the TeamUSA Summer Champions Series, presented by Comcast.

Beisel actually touched the wall third, 4.69 seconds behind winner Leah Smith. She was upgraded to second — and the final world team berth — after runner-up Ella Eastin was disqualified for an illegal turn.

“Since [Beisel] was about 12 or 13, she’s been the top of USA Swimming,” Smith said on Universal HD. “I’m sad that this is her last year of swimming.”

Beisel did not dive into retirement talk Thursday but said she’s “nearing the end” and that her Speedo contract is up in December.

SWIM NATIONALS: Broadcast Schedule | Event Schedule/Results

Beisel, who made the team on just two months of training after a post-Rio break, regretted qualifying via DQ and said she urged Eastin to appeal.

“It’s weird for me to say that I am going to Budapest … the circumstances couldn’t be worse,” Beisel said on USA Swimming’s Deck Pass Live. “After the race [but before the DQ], I was looking at Leah, I was looking at Ella, and I was like, you guys are the future. I’m handing you the 400m IM baton.”

Beisel learned of the DQ first by looking at the scoreboard. Still in the pool, she told Eastin, a rising Stanford junior who had thought she made her first world team.

“You just see how elated she is,” Beisel said, “and you go from cloud nine to rock bottom in three seconds.”

Eastin’s last shot to make the world team comes in the 200m individual medley Saturday. She is ranked third in the U.S. this year in the event.

In other races Thursday, Olympians Kelsi Worrell and Caeleb Dressel won the 100m butterflies. Olympic silver medalist Chase Kalisz took the men’s 400m IM in 4:06.99, the fastest time in the world this year.

Kalisz is going to his third straight worlds, while Beisel is the only American swimmer to qualify for every major international meet since 2006.

She essentially took nine months off from competition after the Rio Olympics, traveling the world with eight-time Olympic medalist Allison Schmitt, who is believed to be retired.

“Now, at my age, I know what I can mentally and physically handle, and I’m not going to overdo it,” Beisel said on Deck Pass on Tuesday. “I know I’m not going to make the team in certain events, so I’m putting all my eggs in one basket this week [the 400m IM] with hopes that it works out. I’m what they call a one-hit wonder these days.”

Beisel was the youngest member of the U.S. team at the 2006 Pan Pacific Championships (qualifying as a 13-year-old), 2007 World Championships and 2008 Olympics.

She earned her first world medal in 2009, then the world 400m IM title in 2011.

Both of her Olympic medals came in London, where she led the 400m IM by .81 of a second after 300 meters. But then Chinese 16-year-old Ye Shiwen went 1.77 seconds faster than Beisel on the first 50 meters of freestyle and ended up beating the American by 2.84 seconds, taking 1.02 off the world record.

Plenty of scrutiny was placed on Ye, the 2011 World 200m IM champion who chopped more than five seconds off her 400m IM personal best in London. But Beisel was not outwardly skeptical of Ye, who since London has not swum within two seconds of her since-broken world record.

“She had the race of her life,” Beisel said minutes after the London 400m IM. “Congratulations to her a million times over. It’s definitely hard getting second, but I can’t complain at all.“

Beisel later took bronze in the London 200m backstroke, sharing the podium with Missy Franklin.

In 2016, Beisel made the Olympic team by finishing second in the 400m IM at trials and then placed sixth in Rio.

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MORE: Franklin: ‘What if I’m never as good as I was?’

2023 French Open women’s singles draw, scores

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At the French Open, Iga Swiatek of Poland eyes a third title at Roland Garros and a fourth Grand Slam singles crown overall.

The tournament airs live on NBC Sports, Peacock and Tennis Channel through championship points in Paris.

Swiatek, the No. 1 seed from Poland, can join Serena Williams and Justine Henin as the lone women to win three or more French Opens since 2000.

Turning 22 during the tournament, she can become the youngest woman to win three French Opens since Monica Seles in 1992 and the youngest woman to win four Slams overall since Williams in 2002.

FRENCH OPEN: Broadcast Schedule | Men’s Draw

But Swiatek is not as dominant as in 2022, when she went 16-0 in the spring clay season during an overall 37-match win streak.

She retired from her most recent match with a right thigh injury last week and said it wasn’t serious. Before that, she lost the final of another clay-court tournament to Australian Open champion Aryna Sabalenka of Belarus.

Sabalenka, the No. 2 seed, and Elena Rybakina of Kazakhstan, the No. 4 seed and Wimbledon champion, are the top challengers in Paris.

No. 3 Jessica Pegula and No. 6 Coco Gauff, runner-up to Swiatek last year, are the best hopes to become the first American to win a Grand Slam singles title since Sofia Kenin at the 2020 Australian Open. The 11-major drought is the longest for U.S. women since Seles won the 1996 Australian Open.

MORE: All you need to know for 2023 French Open

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2023 French Open Women’s Singles Draw

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2023 French Open men’s singles draw, scores

French Open Men's Draw
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The French Open men’s singles draw is missing injured 14-time champion Rafael Nadal for the first time since 2004, leaving the Coupe des Mousquetaires ripe for the taking.

The tournament airs live on NBC Sports, Peacock and Tennis Channel through championship points in Paris.

Novak Djokovic is not only bidding for a third crown at Roland Garros, but also to lift a 23rd Grand Slam singles trophy to break his tie with Nadal for the most in men’s history.

FRENCH OPEN: Broadcast Schedule | Women’s Draw

But the No. 1 seed is Spaniard Carlos Alcaraz, who won last year’s U.S. Open to become, at 19, the youngest man to win a major since Nadal’s first French Open title in 2005.

Now Alcaraz looks to become the second-youngest man to win at Roland Garros since 1989, after Nadal of course.

Alcaraz missed the Australian Open in January due to a right leg injury, but since went 30-3 with four titles. Notably, he has not faced Djokovic this year. They could meet in the semifinals.

Russian Daniil Medvedev, who lost in the French Open first round in 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2020, is improved on clay. He won the Italian Open, the last top-level clay event before the French Open, and is the No. 2 seed ahead of Djokovic.

No. 9 Taylor Fritz, No. 12 Frances Tiafoe and No. 16 Tommy Paul are the highest-seeded Americans, all looking to become the first U.S. man to make the French Open quarterfinals since Andre Agassi in 2003. Since then, five different American men combined to make the fourth round on eight occasions.

MORE: All you need to know for 2023 French Open

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2023 French Open Men’s Singles Draw

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