Lilly King, Chase Kalisz win gold on final day of worlds

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BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP) — Lilly King took the breaststroke rubber match with Yulia Efimova — and set another world record for good measure.

Chase Kalisz kept the U.S. firmly on top of the world in the men’s individual medley.

The brash King knocked off her second record of the world championships in Budapest, touching first in the 50-meter breaststroke Sunday.

King eclipsed the mark of 29.48 set by Lithuania’s Ruta Mielutyte at the 2013 worlds in Barcelona.

King added the 50 mark to her record-setting performance in the 100 breast. This was essentially the deciding match of her duel with Efimova, who won the 200 breast while King finished fourth.

Efiomova settled for silver in the 50 at 29.57, while another American, Katie Meili, took the bronze in 29.99.

“I always think Lilly has a world record in her,” Meili said. “Yeah, I knew she was going to go really fast. She’s been incredible this meet. Totally lights on her every time she gets in the pool, so I’m very very proud of her.”

Despite hard feelings between King and Efimova, sparked last summer when King griped that the Russian should not be allowed to compete because of doping violations, the two hugged each other and even appeared to joke around a bit after the race.

Kalisz breezed to victory in the 400 IM, adding to his triumph in the 200. He became the first swimmer at worlds to sweep the event, which encompasses all four strokes, since Ryan Lochte accomplished the feat in 2011.

Kalisz carried on American domination of the IMs that goes back more than two decades, largely because of Michael Phelps — a former training partner — and Lochte.

Neither is in Budapest, of course. Phelps retired again after the Rio Games, while Lochte was not allowed to compete at worlds because of his shenanigans at last summer’s Olympics.

No worries for Team USA.

Kalisz pulled away on the breaststroke leg and cruised to the finish in 4 minutes, 5.90 seconds — nearly 2½ seconds ahead of the silver medalist, Hungary’s David Verraszto. Japan’s Daiya Seto grabbed the bronze.

In the women’s 50 freestyle, Sweden’s Sarah Sjostrom got a bit of redemption for her loss to American Simone Manuel in the 100 free.

After setting a world record in the semifinals, Sjostrom completed the furious dash from one end of the pool to the other in 23.69 — just two-hundredths off her mark the previous evening.

Ranomi Kromowidjojo of the Netherlands claimed the silver in 23.85, while Manuel settled for the bronze at 23.97.

Manuel knocked off Sjostrom in the 100 free after the Swede went out far too fast on the opening lap and had nothing left for the return. This time, she didn’t have to come back.

France’s Camille Lacourt took gold in the 50 backstroke with a time of 24.35. The silver went to Japan’s Junya Koga, while American veteran Matt Grevers grabbed the bronze.

Women’s 50m Breaststroke Results
Gold: Lilly King (USA) — 29.40
Silver: Yulia Efimova (RUS) — 29.57
Bronze: Katei Meili (USA) — 29.99
4. Ruta Meilutyte (LTU) — 30.20
5. Jennie Johansson (SWE) — 30.31
6. Sarah Vasey (GBR) — 30.62
7. Arianna Castiglioni (ITA) — 30.74
8. Rachel Nicol (CAN) — 30.80

Men’s 400m IM Results
Gold: Chase Kalisz (USA) — 4:05.90
Silver: David Verraszto (HUN) — 4:08.38
Bronze: Daiya Seto (JPN) — 4:09.14
4. Max Litchfield (GBR) — 4:09.62
5. Jay Litherland (USA) — 4:12.05
6. Kosuke Hagino (JPN) — 4:12.65
7. Brandonn Almeida (BRA) — 4:13.00
9. Richard Nagy (SVK) — 4:16.33

Women’s 50m Freestyle Results
Gold: Sarah Sjostrom (SWE) — 23.69
Silver: Ranomi Kromowidjojo (NED) — 23.85
Bronze: Simone Manuel (USA) — 23.97
4. Pernille Blume (DEN) — 24.00
5. Aliaksandra Herasimenia (BLR) — 24.46
6. Liu Xiang (CHN) — 24.58
7. Anna Santamans (FRA) — 24.58
8. Bronte Campbell (AUS) — 24.58

Women’s 400m IM Results
Gold: Katinka Hosszu (HUN) — 4:29.33
Silver: Mireia Belmonte (ESP) — 4:32.17
Bronze: Sydney Pickrem (CAN) — 4:32.88
4. Yui Ohashi (JPN) — 4:34.50
5. Sakiko Shimizu (JPN) — 4:35.62
6. Leah Smith (USA) — 4:36.09
7. Elizabeth Beisel (USA) — 4:37.63
8. Hannah Miley (GBR) — 4:38.34

Tokyo Paralympic medals unveiled with historic Braille design, indentations

Tokyo Paralympic Medals
Tokyo 2020
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The Tokyo Paralympic medals, which like the Olympic medals are created in part with metals from recycled cell phones and other small electronics, were unveiled on Sunday, one year out from the Opening Ceremony.

In a first for the Paralympics, each medal has one to three indentation(s) on its side to distinguish its color by touch — one for gold, two silver and three for bronze. Braille letters also spell out “Tokyo 2020” on each medal’s face.

For Rio, different amounts of tiny steel balls were put inside the medals based on their color, so that when shaken they would make distinct sounds. Visually impaired athletes could shake the medals next to their ears to determine the color.

More on the design from Tokyo 2020:

The design is centered around the motif of a traditional Japanese fan, depicting the Paralympic Games as the source of a fresh new wind refreshing the world as well as a shared experience connecting diverse hearts and minds. The kaname, or pivot point, holds all parts of the fan together; here it represents Para athletes bringing people together regardless of nationality or ethnicity. Motifs on the leaves of the fan depict the vitality of people’s hearts and symbolize Japan’s captivating and life-giving natural environment in the form of rocks, flowers, wood, leaves, and water. These are applied with a variety of techniques, producing a textured surface that makes the medals compelling to touch.

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Tokyo Paralympic Medals

Tokyo Paralympic Medals

Alysa Liu lands quad Lutz

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Alysa Liu, a 14-year-old who in January became the youngest U.S. women’s figure skating champion, on Saturday landed a quadruple Lutz, something no other U.S. woman has done in competition.

Liu landed the jump at the Aurora Games, a women’s sports festival in Albany, N.Y. It does not count officially, since it’s not a sanctioned competition.

Previously, Sasha Cohen landed a quadruple Salchow in practice in 2001, but never in competition. At least three Russian teens landed quads in junior competition in the last two years.

Kazakhstan’s Elizabet Tursynbaeva became the first woman to land a clean, fully rotated quad in senior competition en route to silver at last season’s world championships.

Liu, who landed three triple Axels between two programs at January’s nationals, makes her junior international debut at a Grand Prix stop in Lake Placid, N.Y., next week.

She will not meet the age minimum for senior international competitions until the 2022 Olympic season. But she can continue to compete at senior nationals.

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