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Galen Rupp, Jordan Hasay chase more history at Chicago Marathon

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Galen Rupp and Jordan Hasay look to end the longest U.S. victory drought in Chicago Marathon history, live on NBCSN and NBC Sports Gold on Sunday at 8 a.m. ET.

It’s been 12 years since an American runner won in the Windy City — Deena Kastor in 2005. The longest gap before that was six years at a race held annually since 1977.

Rupp and Hasay, both coached by three-time New York City Marathon champion Alberto Salazar, already put a stamp on U.S. road racing this year.

Rupp was second and Hasay third at the Boston Marathon on April 17. It marked the best U.S. combined male and female finishes at the world’s oldest annual 26.2-mile race since 1985. (The U.S. hasn’t put male and female runners in the top three in Chicago in the same year since 1996.)

Now, both Oregon runners say they’re in the best form of their short marathon careers heading into Chicago.

Rupp goes into his fourth attempt feeling like a healthy and prepared marathoner for the first time.

The 31-year-old ran his first two marathons in 2016 (winning Olympic Trials, bronze at the Rio Games) while splitting time training for shorter races on the track. For Boston, Rupp was severely limited by plantar fasciitis in the lead up. So much so that he didn’t think he would toe the Hopkinton start line as recently as two weeks before the event.

Salazar told Rupp in Boston that it was one of the mentally toughest races he had ever run.

Still, Rupp has not yet been tested in a fast race. His best 26.2-mile time is 2:09:58 with the caveat that his three marathons thus far have been in difficult conditions. Chicago is a pancake-flat course, but with no pacers.

“I’m hoping that it is a quicker race. I would love for it to be a 2:05 or 2:06 race,” Rupp said by phone Thursday. “I wanted to get in a marathon where I thought it was conducive to running fast. I’m not sure right now I’d be ready to compete in like a Berlin, where it’s a 2:03 race, or a London that’s, like, 2:03, 2:04, given that the only ones I’ve done have all been around 2:10. Even though I felt pretty comfortable for most of the races in there until it really started picking up, you can’t just expect to make those huge jumps from, all of a sudden, running 2:10 to 2:03.”

Rupp, though, refused to speculate how fast he could cover 26.2 miles, if the conditions were ideal.

“I never really like to put a whole lot of limits on what I can do,” he said. “When you start putting certain times, whether you believe it or not, it still puts a limit on what you can do.”

The competition includes world-record holder Dennis Kimetto of Kenya, Olympic silver medalist Feyisa Lilisa of Ethiopia and Stanley Biwott, a New York City Marathon winner. All have run sub-2:05. But Rupp could beat all of them.

Kimetto, who won Berlin in 2:02:57 in 2014, has finished just one marathon in the last 2 1/2 years — in an unimpressive 2:11:44.

Lilisa, though he pulled away from Rupp in Rio, went 2:15:57 and 2:14:12 at his two most recent marathons.

Biwott dropped out of the Rio Olympic marathon and New York City in 2016 and withdrew before the London Marathon in April with a hamstring injury.

More reliable is defending champion Abel Kirui of Kenya, a 35-year-old with a slower personal best than the younger men in the aforementioned trio. But Kirui is versatile, having taken world titles at two different venues, an Olympic silver medal in 2012 and runners-up in Berlin and London.

Hasay’s competition is thinner but stronger — Ethiopian Tirunesh Dibaba and Kenyan Florence Kiplagat.

Dibaba, 32, won six Olympic 5000m and 10,000m medals from 2004 through 2012. She has raced two marathons — placing third in London in 2014 and second there this year — and is already the third-fastest woman ever at the distance. If she can again get close to that 2:17:56, she’ll be running alone the final miles.

Kiplagat, 30, is trying to become the first runner to win three straight Chicago Marathons. Her winning time last year — 2:21:32 — is 88 seconds faster than Hasay’s debut in Boston.

“If I run the effort I ran in Boston on a flat course, it should be a PR,” said Hasay, who has trained more with Rupp leading into her second 26.2-miler. “On paper, I’m fitter than that. My long runs have gone tremendously, and my speed is better than it was before Boston.

“I’m less intimidated by the distance. So I think I’ll be a lot more confident in the latter half of the race. I hope to race that last part. In Boston, I got to mile 18, and it was more of a grind rather than a race.”

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Noah Lyles takes next step to stardom as youngest U.S. 100m champion in 34 years

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Incredible, Noah Lyles.

Lyles, wearing red “The Incredibles” socks, won the U.S. 100m title in 9.88 seconds, the fastest time in the world this year, at the USA Track and Field Outdoor Championships in Des Moines on Friday night.

Lyles overtook Ronnie Baker in the final strides to win by .02 and become the youngest man to take the sprint crown since Sam Graddy in 1984. Nationals were held a week before Olympic Trials won by Carl Lewis in 1984. Essentially, Lyles is the youngest U.S. 100m champ since Lewis in 1981.

What’s more incredible is that Lyles is primarily a 200m runner, having finished fourth in that event at the 2016 Olympic Trials as an 18-year-old. Lyles is joint fastest in the world in the 200m this year and has not lost an outdoor 200m since the trials (he missed 2017 Nationals, and thus 2017 Words, with a hamstring tear).

“I wanted to prove myself as a 100m runner,” Lyles, who turned pro after Olympic Trials and skipped NCAA track, told Lewis Johnson on Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA. “I’ve kind of been cheatin’ on my 200m. It’s time to go back to my baby.”

NCAA champion Aleia Hobbs won the women’s 100m in 10.91 seconds, beating Ashley Henderson by .05 and Olympian Jenna Prandini by .07.

Hobbs, 22, was seventh in her senior nationals debut last year. She entered Des Moines with the four fastest times among Americans this year, ranked No. 3 in the world behind Marie-Josée Ta Lou of Cote d’Ivoire and Nigerian Blessing Okagbare-Ighotegunor.

The U.S.’ established 100m stars — world gold and silver medalists Justin Gatlin and Christian Coleman and world champion Tori Bowie — are not racing at nationals. This is the only year in the four-year cycle without an Olympics or world outdoor championships.

USATF Outdoors continue Saturday on NBC (4-6 p.m. ET) and NBC Sports Gold (11 a.m.-6 p.m.), highlighted by 400m, 1500m and 100m hurdles finals.

USATF Outdoors: TV Schedule | Results | Women’s Preview | Men’s Preview

Earlier Friday, Olympic champion Christian Taylor fouled and passed out of the triple jump after three jumps, shortly after finishing fifth in his 400m semifinal to miss Saturday’s final by one spot.

Olympian Zach Ziemek became the first man other than Ashton Eaton and Trey Hardee to win the U.S. decathlon title since 2010. Ziemek, who finished third, third and second the last three years, scored 8,294 points to win by 275 over Solomon Simmons.

Favorites Kendall Ellis, Courtney Okolo and Shakima Wimbley advanced to Saturday’s women’s 400m final. Olympic silver medalist Allyson Felix and 2017 World champion Phyllis Francis chose not to race the 400m in Des Moines. Eighteen-year-old pro Sydney McLaughlin, fastest in the world this year in the 400m hurdles, entered the 400m but scratched before Thursday’s first round after feeling tightness in her quad in warm-up.

World bronze medalist Ajee’ Wilson and Olympic bronze medalist Clayton Murphy highlighted the qualifiers into Sunday’s 800m finals.

MORE: Lyles, Norman, green teens at Olympic Trials, now stars at USATF Champs

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He won a gold medal with Michael Phelps, then he lived in his car

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Klete Keller, a five-time Olympic medalist who anchored the U.S. 4x200m freestyle relay to gold (holding off Ian Thorpe) at the 2004 Athens Games, went into “a deep depression” after a 2014 divorce and said he lived in his car for almost one year, according to USA Swimming.

“I was paying child support for my kids and couldn’t afford a place, so I lived in my car for almost a year,” Keller, a 36-year-old who retired after his third Olympics in 2008, said, according to USA Swimming. “I had a Ford Fusion at the time, so at 6-foot-6, it was challenging to make the room to sleep. But I made it work.”

Keller, who has three kids, was jobless and homeless.

“He alternated parking at one of the two Wal-Marts in his area and at rest stops and kept his gym membership active so he had somewhere to shower and workout,” according to the story.

In a spring 2014 interview, Keller said he was bitter toward his swimming career and didn’t know where three of his Olympic medals were located.

“It’s not right, but I still probably hold some bitterness toward myself mostly, but also a little bit toward my sport because I let myself get too deep into it,” Keller said then. “I’m still not quite over that, unfortunately, but I’m working on it. I do love the sport. I’m just a little disappointed overall.”

The effects of leaving swimming spread through his life.

“After swimming, I thought I had to find the same title or level of success in my work — no matter what I was doing or how much I didn’t enjoy it – to feel that same success that I did in swimming,” Keller said, according to USA Swimming. “In swimming, you have to be selfish to a large degree to be successful, but when you are a husband and father, you have to be more selfless — and I wasn’t. As I look back now, I wasn’t a very good husband.”

Now, Keller is back on his feet, having moved to Colorado Springs, working in residential real estate and accruing airline miles on his credit card to fund trips to see his children, according to USA Swimming.

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