Lindsey Vonn explains her uniquely placed tattoos

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You won’t see Lindsey Vonn‘s tattoos when she’s in her full-body race suit, obviously. You won’t see them when she’s working out in the gym. Or when posing on a red carpet.

The 2010 Olympic downhill champion got her first permanent tattoo about a year ago. It’s the outline of a shark. And it’s strategically placed on the side of one of her fingers.

“[The shark is] just to signify always moving forward,” Vonn, who previously swam with sharks, said at the U.S. Ski & Snowboard Gold Medal Gala in New York City last week. “Sharks can’t move backwards. They can’t stand still. Otherwise they die. So, I just have to keep that in mind. Keep remembering to stay focused on my goals and always go after them.”

Vonn revealed the shark to Snapchat followers on the morning of Jan. 21. “Game day,” she captioned the image from Germany.

Hours later, Vonn won a downhill in Garmisch-Partenkirchen (video here), marking her return to the top after the most painful injury of her career two months earlier.

Then this summer, Vonn got a second tattoo. It’s the word “believe” in Greek. Again, on the inside of a finger.

“Signifying my last Olympics [in 2018] and just need to believe in myself,” she said.

The tattoo placements are reminiscent of actor Bryan Cranston, who got the “Breaking Bad” logo tattooed on the inside of a finger. That way it was hidden, but he could look at it anytime he wanted.

Why did Vonn choose that space?

“I’m going to keep that a secret,” she said.

Vonn answered questions about other news topics:

On how confident she is that the International Ski Federation (FIS) will accept her bid to race men next fall, in light of critical comments from top European ski officials:

“I’m not confident, but at the same time we still have some wiggle room. We still have quite a few months. Hopefully, I can get my point across and I can maybe convince someone that sees me as a princess and be able to change his mind. But, you know, I’m not holding my breath. If it doesn’t work, then I will find another solution. But it will happen one way or the other.”

On whether that created tension when she raced in Austria two weeks ago:

“I think they all realize that their comments weren’t appropriate, and they choose not to engage me. Which is smart on their part.”

On world downhill champion Ilka Stuhec suffering a season-ending ACL tear:

“I found out from her Twitter feed. I think FIS retweeted it, or one of those ski outlets retweeted it. I was shocked. She was in really great shape. I just saw her in Chile [at preseason training]. Obviously, it’s incredibly disappointing to see a big star from our sport go down right before the Games. But she’s one of quite a few, unfortunately, this spring and summer and fall, already. All I can do is hope that she comes back strong. I’ve done it, so I know she can, too.”

Would it mean anything different to win Olympic downhill gold without the reigning world champion in the field?

“Sochi went on without me, without the reigning world champion as well [Marion Rolland of France]. It is what it is. It’s part of the sport. People come and go. Injuries happen. That’s life. Whoever is in the starting gate that day is who you have to beat.”

On her friendship with Olympic champion gymnast Aly Raisman:

“She has really good morals and great character. I really enjoy spending time with her. She’s a young athlete, so it’s fun to see her grow and mature in just the few months that I’ve known her. She might be the Olympic athlete that I’m closest to, probably, but I still have my teammates in Alpine skiing as well.”

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MORE: 100 Olympic storylines 100 days out from PyeongChang

Aksel Lund Svindal, Olympic Alpine champ, has testicular cancer, ‘prognosis good’

Aksel Lund Svindal
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Aksel Lund Svindal, a retired Olympic Alpine skiing champion from Norway, said he underwent surgery for testicular cancer and the prognosis “looked very good.”

“Tests, scans and surgery all happened very quickly,” Svindal, 39, wrote on social media. “And already after the first week I knew the prognoses looked very good. All thanks to that first decision to go see a doctor as soon as I suspected something was off.”

Svindal retired in 2019 after winning the Olympic super-G in 2010 and downhill in 2018. He also won five world titles among the downhill, combined and giant slalom and two World Cup overall titles.

Svindal said he felt a change in his body that prompted him to see a doctor.

“The last few weeks have been different,” he wrote. “But I’m able to say weeks and not months because of great medical help, a little luck and a good decision.

“I wasn’t sure what it was, or if it was anything at all. … [I] was quickly transferred to the hospital where they confirmed what the doctor suspected. Testicle cancer.”

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2022 FIBA Women’s World Cup schedule, results

FIBA Women's World Cup
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The U.S. goes for its fourth consecutive title at the FIBA World Cup in Sydney — and eighth global gold in a row overall when including the Olympics.

A’ja Wilson, a two-time WNBA MVP, and Breanna Stewart, the Tokyo Olympic MVP, headline a U.S. roster that, for the first time since 2000, includes neither Sue Bird (retired) nor Diana Taurasi (injured).

The new-look team includes nobody over the age of 30 for the first time since 1994, before the U.S. began its dynasty at the 1996 Atlanta Games. The Americans have won 52 consecutive games between worlds and the Olympics dating to the 2006 Worlds bronze-medal game.

The field also includes host Australia, the U.S.’ former primary rival, and Olympic silver medalist Japan.

Nigeria, which played the U.S. the closest of any foe in Tokyo (losing by nine points), isn’t present after its federation withdrew the team over governance issues. Spain, ranked second in the world, failed to qualify.

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2022 FIBA Women’s World Cup Schedule

Date Time (ET) Game Round
Wed., Sept. 21 8:30 p.m. Puerto Rico 82, Bosnia and Herzegovina 58 Group A
9:30 p.m. USA 87, Belgium 72 Group A
11 p.m. Canada 67, Serbia 60 Group B
Thurs., Sept. 22 12 a.m. Japan 89, Mali 56 Group B
3:30 a.m. China 107, South Korea 44 Group A
6:30 a.m. France 70, Australia 57 Group B
8:30 p.m. USA 106, Puerto Rico 42 Group A
10 p.m. Serbia 69, Japan 64 Group B
11 p.m. Belgium 84, South Korea 61 Group A
Fri., Sept. 23 12:30 a.m. China 98, Bosnia and Herzegovina 51 Group A
4 a.m. Canada 59, France 45 Group B
6:30 a.m. Australia 118, Mali 58 Group B
Sat., Sept. 24 12:30 a.m. USA 77, China 63 Group A
4 a.m. South Korea 99, Bosnia and Herzegovina 66 Group A
6:30 a.m. Belgium 68, Puerto Rico 65 Group A
Sun., Sept. 25 12:30 a.m. France vs. Mali Group B
4 a.m. Australia vs. Serbia Group B
6:30 a.m. Canada vs. Japan Group B
9:30 p.m. Belgium vs. Bosnia and Herzegovina Group A
11:30 p.m. Mali vs. Serbia Group B
Mon., Sept. 26 12 a.m. USA vs. South Korea Group A
2 a.m. France vs. Japan Group B
3:30 a.m. China vs. Puerto Rico Group A
6:30 a.m. Australia vs. Canada Group B
9:30 p.m. Puerto Rico vs. South Korea Group A
11:30 p.m. Belgium vs. China Group A
Tues., Sept. 27 12 a.m. USA vs. Bosnia and Herzegovina Group A
2 a.m. Canada vs. Mali Group B
3:30 a.m. France vs. Serbia Group B
6:30 a.m. Australia vs. Japan Group B
Wed., Sept. 28 10 p.m. Quarterfinal
Thurs., Sept. 29 12:30 a.m. Quarterfinal
4 a.m. Quarterfinal
6:30 a.m. Quarterfinal
Fri., Sept. 30 3 .m. Semifinal
5:30 a.m. Semifinal
11 p.m. Third-Place Game
Sat., Oct. 1 2 a.m. Final