McKayla Maroney says settlement covered up sex abuse

Getty Images
0 Comments

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Olympic gold medalist McKayla Maroney was forced to sign a confidential settlement with the group that trains U.S. Olympic gymnasts to keep allegations that she was sexually abused by team doctor Larry Nassar a secret, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday.

Maroney, who won a team gold and an individual silver on vault as part of the “Fierce Five” U.S. women’s team at the 2012 Olympics in London, said Nassar’s abuse started in her early teens and continued for the rest of her competitive career.

After suffering sexual abuse and “years of psychological trauma,” Maroney reached a settlement with USA Gymnastics in December 2016, but the terms of the agreement weren’t disclosed in court papers.

Her lawsuit seeks to invalidate parts of the settlement, arguing it violated California law and that USA Gymnastics “had a plan to keep the sexual abuse of Nassar quiet.”

Maroney, who is now 22 years old, said in a Twitter post in October that the abuse started when she was 13 and attending a U.S. national team training camp in Houston.

Nassar told her at the time that she was receiving “medically necessary treatment he had been performing on patients for over 30 years,” she said at the time.

Her attorney, John Manly, said she had been abused between 50 and 100 times by Nassar, including at the Olympics and during the world championships.

She has described Nassar giving her a sleeping pill while the team traveled to Japan for the 2011 world championships.

Maroney says Nassar later visited her in her hotel room after the team arrived in Tokyo, where he molested her yet again.

“First and foremost, she wants this never to happen to another little girl,” Manly said in an interview Wednesday.

The settlement included nondisclosure and non-disparagement clauses and Maroney or her parents could be sued for more than $100,000 for violating the agreement.

The suit seeks to invalidate those provisions under a California law which prohibits settlements in civil cases that could result in criminal sex offense charges.

“It’s despicable and it is wrong,” Manly said of the settlement agreement.

Nassar has admitted to sexually assaulting female gymnasts, possessing child pornography and molesting girls who sought treatment.

He was sentenced earlier this month to serve 60 years in federal prison for possessing thousands of images of child pornography.

Maroney’s lawsuit also names the U.S. Olympic Committee and Michigan State University, where Nassar had worked for decades.

The court complaint alleges the university had received complaints from two female athletes who accused the doctor of inappropriately touching them in the late 1990s and that the USOC has had “a culture and atmosphere that conceals known and suspected sexual abusers.”

USA Gymnastics said the settlement was legal under California law and that Maroney’s attorney asked for the confidential mediation process.

The sanctioning body said the settlement included a “mutual non-disclosure clause and a mutual non-disparagement clause.”

USA Gymnastics said it first learned about the allegations against Nassar in 2015 and reported him to the FBI.

Michigan State University, which was also named in Maroney’s lawsuit, said it doesn’t comment on pending litigation.

U.S. Olympic Committee spokesman Mark Jones said it was first made aware of the allegations involving a USA Gymnastics physician in the summer of 2015. Jones said USA Gymnastics told them team officials were contacting law enforcement.

Jones said the USOC is hopeful new measures will “help ensure that tragedies like this will never happen again.”

Ironman Kona World Championships return for first time in three years, live on Peacock

Ironman Kona World Championship
Ironman
0 Comments

The Ironman Kona World Championships return after a three-year hiatus with a new format, live on Peacock on Thursday and Saturday at 12 p.m. ET.

The Ironman, held annually in Hawaii since 1978, and in Kailua-Kona since 1981, was not held in 2020 or 2021 due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The world championships made a one-time-only stop in St. George, Utah, on May 7 to make up for the 2021 cancellation. The winners were Norway’s Kristian Blummenfelt, the Tokyo Olympic triathlon champion, and Swiss Daniela Ryf, who bagged her fifth Ironman world title.

Both are entered in Kailua-Kona, where the races are now split between two days — Thursday for the women and Saturday for the men.

An Ironman includes a 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike and a marathon — totaling 140.6 miles of racing. It takes top triathletes eight hours to complete. Very arguably, it crowns the world’s fittest man and woman.

WATCH LIVE: Ironman Kona, Thursday, 12 p.m. ET — STREAM LINK

Ryf, 35 and a 2008 and 2012 Olympian, can tie retired countrywoman Natascha Badmann for second place on the women’s list at six Ironman world titles. Only Zimbabwean-turned-American Paula Newby-Fraser has more with eight.

The field also includes German Anne Haug, the 2019 Kona champ and only woman other than Ryf to win since 2015. Brit Lucy Charles-Barclay, the Kona runner-up in 2017, 2018 and 2019, returns after missing the St. George event due to a stress fracture in her hip.

Blummenfelt, 28 and in his Kona debut, will try to become the youngest male champion in Kona since German Normann Stadler in 2005. His top challengers include countryman Gustav Iden, the two-time reigning Half Ironman world champion, and German Patrick Lange, the 2017 and 2018 Ironman Kona winner.

Also racing Saturday is Dallas Clark, a retired All-Pro NFL tight end with the Indianapolis Colts, and Tony Kanaan, the 2013 Indy 500 champion who completed the 2011 Kona Ironman in 12 hours, 52 minutes, 40 seconds.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

Joan Benoit Samuelson, Olympic marathon champ in 1984, runs London Marathon at 65

Joan Benoit Samuelson
Getty
0 Comments

Joan Benoit Samuelson, the first Olympic women’s marathon champion in 1984, ran her first 26.2-mile race in three years at Sunday’s London Marathon and won her age group.

Benoit Samuelson, 65, clocked 3 hours, 20 minutes, 20 seconds to top the women’s 65-69 age group by 7 minutes, 52 seconds. She took pleasure in being joined in the race by daughter Abby, who crossed in 2:58:19.

“She may have beaten me with my replacement knee, but everybody said I wouldn’t do it! I will never say never,” Benoit Samuelson said, according to race organizers. “I am a grandmother now to Charlotte, and it’s my goal to run 5K with her.”

LONDON MARATHON: Results

Benoit Samuelson raced the 1987 Boston Marathon while three months pregnant with Abby. Before that, she won the first Olympic women’s marathon at the 1984 Los Angeles Games, plus the Boston Marathon in 1979 and 1983 and the Chicago Marathon in 1985.

Her personal best — 2:21:21 — still holds up. She ranks sixth in U.S. women’s history.

Benoit Samuelson plans to race the Tokyo Marathon to complete her set of doing all six annual World Marathon Majors. The others are Berlin, Boston, Chicago and New York City.

“I’m happy to finish this race and make it to Tokyo, but I did it today on a wing and a prayer,” she said, according to organizers. “I’m blessed to have longevity in this sport. It doesn’t owe me anything, but I feel I owe my sport.”

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!