Figure skater Jimmy Ma glad fans enjoyed ‘Turn Down for What’ (video)

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Jimmy Ma was a concert pianist who performed at Carnegie Hall (via his Icenetwork.com bio), but now he’s also the figure skater who performed to “Turn Down for What” at the U.S. Championships.

Ma’s program including the 2013 DJ Snake and Lil Jon hit — which went viral.

“The idea was to just be different, have fun with it,” Ma, a 22-year-old from Queens, N.Y., who has studied finance at Fordham University, told Icenetwork. “I don’t really care what other people think, but I wanted to have fun on the ice. I wanted to bring my personality out on the ice. It was just, like whatever, but I’m really happy people liked it.”

Ma placed 11th in the short program and has no real chance at making the PyeongChang Olympic team of three men.

But he lit up the crowd, unzipping his jacket mid-skate and adding a Michael Jordan tongue wag.

How did he choose “Turn Down for What?” USA Today has that story:

In May, Ma sat down with his choreographer Nikolai Morozov over a beer and barbeque and ran through a bunch of different tracks. After trying several out on the ice, they settled on Turn Down For What. The theme was complete with a badass persona, as Ma first thumped his chest then urged applause from the audience in the moments after the conclusion.

He will perform Saturday night’s free skate to a very different artist.

“It’s Rachmaninoff,” he said. “Boring. But, like, that’s my style on the ice. I like to show people that I can skate to this, but also I can skate to this. It’s two different ends of the spectrum that I like to show people because my personality is not poetic whatsoever.”

Ma performed to Eminem music last year (video here). What does he have in store for next season?

“Next year, that’s a long story,” said Ma, who listed “card magic” as a hobby in his International Skating Union bio. “There’s no story to that. I have no idea. I have not thought that far ahead yet.

“Raise the bar.”

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David Rudisha escapes car crash ‘well and unhurt’

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David Rudisha, a two-time Olympic champion and world record holder at 800m, is “well and unhurt” after a car accident in his native Kenya, according to his Facebook account.

Kenyan media reported that one of Rudisha’s tires burst on Saturday night, leading his car to collide with a bus, and he was treated for minor injuries at a hospital.

Rudisha, 30, last raced July 4, 2017, missing extended time with a quad muscle strain and back problems. His manager said last week that Rudisha will miss next month’s world championships.

Rudisha owns the three fastest times in history, including the world record 1:40.91 set in an epic 2012 Olympic final.

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Tokyo Paralympic medals unveiled with historic Braille design, indentations

Tokyo Paralympic Medals
Tokyo 2020
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The Tokyo Paralympic medals, which like the Olympic medals are created in part with metals from recycled cell phones and other small electronics, were unveiled on Sunday, one year out from the Opening Ceremony.

In a first for the Paralympics, each medal has one to three indentation(s) on its side to distinguish its color by touch — one for gold, two silver and three for bronze. Braille letters also spell out “Tokyo 2020” on each medal’s face.

For Rio, different amounts of tiny steel balls were put inside the medals based on their color, so that when shaken they would make distinct sounds. Visually impaired athletes could shake the medals next to their ears to determine the color.

More on the design from Tokyo 2020:

The design is centered around the motif of a traditional Japanese fan, depicting the Paralympic Games as the source of a fresh new wind refreshing the world as well as a shared experience connecting diverse hearts and minds. The kaname, or pivot point, holds all parts of the fan together; here it represents Para athletes bringing people together regardless of nationality or ethnicity. Motifs on the leaves of the fan depict the vitality of people’s hearts and symbolize Japan’s captivating and life-giving natural environment in the form of rocks, flowers, wood, leaves, and water. These are applied with a variety of techniques, producing a textured surface that makes the medals compelling to touch.

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Tokyo Paralympic Medals

Tokyo Paralympic Medals