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Team USA: U.S. Olympic full PyeongChang athlete roster

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The U.S. Olympic team roster for PyeongChang is the largest of any nation in Winter Games history.

The U.S. is sending 242 athletes to South Korea for the Winter Games, where competition starts Feb. 8 and the Opening Ceremony is Feb. 9.

The full U.S. Olympic team roster by sport:

Alpine Skiing (22)
Stacey Cook
Breezy Johnson
Megan McJames
Alice McKennis
Laurenne Ross
Mikaela Shiffrin
Resi Stiegler
Lindsey Vonn
Jackie Wiles
Bryce Bennett
Tommy Biesemeyer
David Chodounsky
Ryan Cochran-Siegle
Mark Engel
Tommy Ford
Jared Goldberg
Tim Jitloff
Nolan Kasper
Ted Ligety
Wiley Maple
Steven Nyman
Andrew Weibrecht

Biathlon (10)
Emily Dreissigacker
Susan Dunklee
Clare Egan
Maddie Phaneuf
Joanne Reid
Lowell Bailey
Tim Burke
Russell Currier
Sean Doherty
Leif Nordgren

Bobsled (16)
Aja Evans
Lauren Gibbs
Jamie Greubel Poser
Elana Meyers Taylor
Hakeem Abdul-Saboor
Codie Bascue
Nick Cunningham
Chris Fogt
Chris Kinney
Steven Langton
Sam McGuffie
Sam Michener
Justin Olsen
Carlo Valdes
Nate Weber
Evan Weinstock

Cross-Country Skiing (20)
Sadie Bjornsen
Rosie Brennan
Sophie Caldwell
Jessie Diggins
Rosie Frankowski
Annie Hart
Kaitlynn Miller
Caitlin Patterson
Kikkan Randall
Ida Sargent
Liz Stephen
Erik Bjornsen
Patrick Caldwell
Simi Hamilton
Logan Hanneman
Reese Hanneman
Noah Hoffman
Tyler Kornfield
Andy Newell
Scott Patterson

Curling (10)
Aileen Geving
Becca Hamilton
Tabitha Peterson
Nina Roth
Cory Christensen (alternate, eligible to substitute at the Olympics)

Tyler George
Matt Hamilton
John Landsteiner
John Shuster
Joe Polo (alternate, eligible to substitute at the Olympics)

Figure Skating (14)
Karen Chen (Singles)
Mirai Nagasu (Singles)
Bradie Tennell (Singles)
Nathan Chen (Singles)
Adam Rippon (Singles)
Vincent Zhou (Singles)
Alexa Scimeca Knierim (Pairs)
Chris Knierim (Pairs)
Madison Hubbell (Ice Dance)
Zachary Donohue (Ice Dance)
Maia Shibutani (Ice Dance)
Alex Shibutani (Ice Dance)
Madison Chock (Ice Dance)
Evan Bates (Ice Dance)

Freestyle Skiing (29)
Ashley Caldwell (Aerials)
Kiley McKinnon (Aerials)
Madison Olsen (Aerials)
Mac Bohonnon (Aerials)
Jonathon Lillis (Aerials)
Eric Loughran (Aerials)
Tess Johnson (Moguls)
Jaelin Kauf (Moguls)
Keaton McCargo (Moguls)
Morgan Schild (Moguls)
Casey Andringa (Moguls)
Troy Murphy (Moguls)
Emerson Smith (Moguls)
Brad Wilson (Moguls)
Maddie Bowman (Halfpipe)
Annalisa Drew (Halfpipe)
Devin Logan (Halfpipe, Slopestyle)
Brita Sigourney (Halfpipe)
Aaron Blunck (Halfpipe)
Alex Ferreira (Halfpipe)
David Wise (Halfpipe)
Torin Yater-Wallace (Halfpipe)
Caroline Claire (Slopestyle)
Darian Stevens (Slopestyle)
Maggie Voisin (Slopestyle)
Nick Goepper (Slopestyle)
Alex Hall (Slopestyle)
Gus Kenworthy (Slopestyle)
McRae Williams (Slopestyle)

Hockey (48)
Nicole Hensley (Goalie)
Alex Rigsby (Goalie)
Maddie Rooney (Goalie)
Cayla Barnes (Defense)
Kacey Bellamy (Defense)
Kali Flanagan (Defense)
Megan Keller (Defense)
Sidney Morin (Defense)
Emily Pfalzer (Defense)
Lee Stecklein (Defense)
Hannah Brandt (Forward)
Dani Cameranesi (Forward)
Kendall Coyne (Forward)
Brianna Decker (Forward)
Meghan Duggan (Forward)
Amanda Kessel (Forward)
Hilary Knight (Forward)
Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson (Forward)
Monique Lamoureux-Morando (Forward)
Gigi Marvin (Forward)
Kelly Pannek (Forward)
Amanda Pelkey (Forward)
Haley Skarupa (Forward)

David Leggio (Goalie)
Brandon Maxwell (Goalie)
Ryan Zapolski (Goalie)
Chad Billins (Defense)
Jonathon Blum (Defense)
Will Borgen (Defense)
Matt Gilroy (Defense)
Ryan Gunderson (Defense)
Bobby Sanguinetti (Defense)
Noah Welch (Defense)
James Wisniewski (Defense)
Mark Arcobello (Forward)
Chris Bourque (Forward)
Bobby Butler (Forward)
Ryan Donato (Forward)
Brian Gionta (Forward)
Jordan Greenway (Forward)
Chad Kolarik (Forward)
Broc Little (Forward)
John McCarthy (Forward)
Brian O’Neill (Forward)
Garrett Roe (Forward)
Jim Slater (Forward)
Ryan Stoa (Forward)
Troy Terry (Forward)

Luge (10)
Summer Britcher (Singles)
Erin Hamlin (Singles)
Emily Sweeney (Singles)
Chris Mazdzer (Singles)
Taylor Morris (Singles)
Tucker West (Singles)
Matt Mortensen (Doubles)
Jayson Terdiman (Doubles)
Justin Krewson (Doubles)
Andrew Sherk (Doubles)

Nordic Combined (5)
Ben Berend
Bryan Fletcher
Taylor Fletcher
Jasper Good
Ben Loomis

Short Track Speed Skating (8)
Maame Biney
Lana Gehring
Jessica Kooreman
J.R. Celski
Thomas Hong
John-Henry Krueger
Ryan Pivirotto
Aaron Tran

Skeleton (4)
Katie Uhlaender
Kendall Wesenberg
Matthew Antoine
John Daly

Ski Jumping (7)
Nita Englund
Sarah Hendrickson
Abby Ringquist
Kevin Bickner
Michael Glasder
Casey Larson
Will Rhoads

Snowboarding (26)
Jamie Anderson (Big Air/Slopestyle)
Jessika Jenson (Big Air/Slopestyle)
Hailey Langland (Big Air/Slopestyle)
Julia Marino (Big Air/Slopestyle)
Chris Corning (Big Air/Slopestyle)
Red Gerard (Big Air/Slopestyle)
Kyle Mack (Big Air/Slopestyle)
Ryan Stassel (Big Air/Slopestyle)
Faye Gulini (Snowboard Cross)
Lindsey Jacobellis (Snowboard Cross)
Rosie Mancari (Snowboard Cross)
Meghan Tierney (Snowboard Cross)
Nick Baumgartner (Snowboard Cross)
Jonathan Cheever (Snowboard Cross)
Mick Dierdorff (Snowboard Cross)
Hagen Kearney (Snowboard Cross)
Kelly Clark (Halfpipe)
Arielle Gold (Halfpipe)
Chloe Kim (Halfpipe)
Maddie Mastro (Halfpipe)
Ben Ferguson (Halfpipe)
Chase Josey (Halfpipe)
Jake Pates (Halfpipe)
Shaun White (Halfpipe)
AJ Muss (Parallel Giant Slalom)
Mike Trapp (Parallel Giant Slalom)

Speed Skating (13)
Heather Bergsma
Brittany Bowe
Erin Jackson
Mia Manganello
Carlijn Schoutens
Jerica Tandiman
Shani Davis
Jonathan Garcia
Kimani Griffin
Brian Hansen
Emery Lehman
Joey Mantia
Mitch Whitmore

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MORE: 100 storylines for PyeongChang Olympics

World Cup Alpine season opener gets green light

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After checking the snow on the Rettenbach glacier in Soelden, Austria, FIS officials announced Thursday that the traditional World Cup season opener is set to go ahead as planned Oct. 26-27 with men’s and women’s giant slalom races.

Current conditions at Soelden show a solid 30 inches of snow at the summit. The race finishes at an altitude of 2,670 meters (8,760 feet), far above the currently snowless village.

The first races of the season are never guaranteed to have enough snow, though last year’s men’s race at Soelden had the opposite problem, being canceled when a storm blew through with heavy snowfall and high winds. 

France’s Tessa Worley won the women’s race last year ahead of Italy’s Frederica Brignone and U.S. skier Mikaela Shiffrin, who would go on to dominate the rest of the World Cup season.

The Soelden weekend is followed by three dormant weeks until the season resumes Nov. 23-24 in Levi, Finland. The World Cup circuits then switch to North America. The men will run speed events Nov. 30-Dec. 1 in Lake Louise, Alberta, then head to Beaver Creek, Colo., for more speed events and a giant slalom Dec. 6-8. The women run slalom and giant slalom Nov. 30-Dec. 1 in Killington, Vt., and head to Lake Louise the next weekend.

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Olympic marathon and race walk move from Tokyo to Sapporo draws some pushback

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In the wake of a dropout-plagued set of world championship endurance races in Qatar, moving the 2020 Olympic marathons and race walks from Tokyo to the cooler venue of Sapporo is a quick fix for one problem, pending the potential for untimely heat waves.

But the move has drawn some opposition for a variety of reasons.

First, many organizers and politicians appear to have been caught by surprise. Tokyo’s governor, Yuriko Koike, was “taken aback” and Sapporo’s mayor, Katsuhiro Akimoto, learned about the move from the media, Kyodo News reported. Koike even sarcastically suggested that the races could move all the way northward to islands disputed by Russia and Japan.

South African sports scientist Ross Tucker suggested that running in heat and humidity poses an interesting challenge for athletes, some of whom may be able to catch up with faster runners by preparing for the conditions.

British marathoner Mara Yamauchi made a similar point, saying the move was unfair to those who already were preparing for the heat, humidity and other conditions.

Belgian marathoner Koen Naert said he will make the best of the change but complained that some of his preparation and every runner’s logistical planning would no longer apply.

The angriest athlete may be Canadian walker Evan Dunfee, who placed fourth in the 2016 Olympic 50km race and nearly claimed bronze as a Canadian appeal was upheld but then rejected. He says runners and walkers can beat the conditions if they prepare, which many athletes did not do for the world championships in Qatar.

“So why do we cater to the ill prepared?” Dunfee asked on Twitter.

The move also takes athletes out of the main Olympic city and takes away the traditional, tough less frequent in modern years, finish in the Olympic stadium.

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