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USA Gymnastics board of directors to resign

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The rest of the USA Gymnastics board of directors will resign before a Jan. 31 deadline to avoid decertification.

“USA Gymnastics will comply with the USOC requirements,” USA Gymnastics said Friday, according to NBC News.

U.S. Olympic Committee CEO Scott Blackmun wrote in a letter to USA Gymnastics that the board had to resign, or the national governing body would be terminated.

“We do not base these requirements on any knowledge that any individual USAG staff or board members had a role in fostering or obscuring Nassar’s actions,” Blackmun wrote in the letter outlining multiple required steps, not just the board resignations. “Our position comes from a clear sense that USAG culture needs fundamental rebuilding.”

Three USA Gymnastics board leaders, including chairman Paul Parilla, resigned Monday amid the Larry Nassar sentencing, where more than 150 women (not all gymnasts) came forward as survivors.

Blackmun wrote that a fourth board member also resigned. The full USA Gymnastics board members list is here.

USA Gymnastics CEO Steve Penny was forced out last year.

In a previous statement, Blackmun said the USOC has been discussing changes with leaders at USA Gymnastics since October.

“Those discussions accelerated over the holidays,” Blackmun said. “New board leadership is necessary because the current leaders have been focused on establishing that they did nothing wrong. USA Gymnastics needs to focus on supporting the brave survivors.”

USA Gymnastics’ new CEO, Kerry Perry, said Monday that the organization supported the three announced resignations.

“We believe this step will allow us to more effectively move forward in implementing change within our organization,” she said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Bobby Joe Morrow, triple Olympic sprint champion, dies at 84

Bobby Joe Morrow
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Bobby Joe Morrow, one of four men to win the 100m, 200m and 4x100m at one Olympics, died at age 84 on Saturday.

Morrow’s family said he died of natural causes.

Morrow swept the 100m, 200m and 4x100m at the 1956 Melbourne Olympics, joining Jesse Owens as the only men to accomplish the feat. Later, Carl Lewis and Usain Bolt did the same.

Morrow, raised on a farm in San Benito, Texas, set 11 world records in a short career, according to World Athletics.

He competed in one Olympics, and that year was named Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year while a student at Abilene Christian. He beat out Mickey Mantle and Floyd Patterson.

“Bobby had a fluidity of motion like nothing I’d ever seen,” Oliver Jackson, the Abilene Christian coach, said, according to Sports Illustrated in 2000. “He could run a 220 with a root beer float on his head and never spill a drop. I made an adjustment to his start when Bobby was a freshman. After that, my only advice to him was to change his major from sciences to speech, because he’d be destined to make a bunch of them.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Johnny Gregorek runs fastest blue jeans mile in history

Johnny Gregorek
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Johnny Gregorek, a U.S. Olympic hopeful runner, clocked what is believed to be the fastest mile in history for somebody wearing jeans.

Gregorek recorded a reported 4 minutes, 6.25 seconds, on Saturday to break the record by more than five seconds (with a pacer for the first two-plus laps). Gregorek, after the record run streamed live on his Instagram, said he wore a pair of 100 percent cotton Levi’s.

Gregorek, the 28-year-old son of a 1980 and 1984 U.S. Olympic steeplechaser, finished 10th in the 2017 World Championships 1500m. He was sixth at the 2016 U.S. Olympic Trials.

He ranked No. 1 in the country for the indoor mile in 2019, clocking 3:49.98. His outdoor mile personal best is 3:52.94, ranking him 30th in American history.

Before the attempt, a fundraiser was started for the National Alliance on Mental Illness, garnering more than $29,000. Gregorek ran in memory of younger brother Patrick, who died suddenly in March 2019.

“Paddy was a fan of anything silly,” Gregorek posted. “I think an all out mile in jeans would tickle him sufficiently!”

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