Lindsey Vonn
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Lindsey Vonn’s injury history

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Lindsey Vonn is certainly no stranger to crashes and injury.

Over the course of her career, the American has made frequent trips from the slope to the hospital with varying degrees of damage to her body.

Here is a brief synopsis of Vonn’s injury history:

2017-18 World Cup: Vonn jarred her back in a Dec. 9 super-G, calling the injury an acute facet (spinal joint) dysfunction. She gingerly walked with aid to congratulate the race winner, then skipped the following day’s race before returning to the World Cup circuit the following week.

2016-17 World Cup: On Nov. 10, Vonn suffers a severely fractured humerus bone in her right arm in a training crash in Copper Mountain, Colo. The injury requires surgery.

Vonn had hoped to make her season debut either two or three weeks later, but her latest setback puts her return into question as well as her pursuit of the career World Cup wins record. She’s at 76, needing 10 more to reach Ingemar Stenmark. Vonn won eight and nine races the last two seasons.

2015-16 World Cup: In New Zealand preseason training Aug. 13, Vonn crashed and fractured an ankle. She missed the World Cup opener Oct. 24 but returned for the following giant slalom Nov. 27.

On Feb. 27, Vonn crashed in a super-G in Andorra, was taken off the course in a sled and learned she suffered one hairline left knee fracture. She raced the next day, finishing 13th in a super combined.

Two days after that, Vonn underwent more scans that showed she suffered three, larger fractures rather than the one hairline, forcing her to end her season while leading the World Cup overall standings, eight races from a possible fifth World Cup overall title.

2013-14 World Cup: While preparing to come back from knee surgery at Beaver Creek, Vonn crashed during a training run at Copper Mountain, Colo. She was taken off the slope on a sled and underwent an MRI and said she sustained a mild strain and partial tear of the ACL in her right knee, minor facial abrasions and scapular contusions from her fall.

It turned out that she had a complete ACL tear, which she compounded with MCL and joint damage when she skied out of the downhill in Val d’Isere on Dec. 21. On Jan. 7, Vonn was forced to withdraw from the Sochi Olympics and didn’t return to World Cup action until December 2014.

2013 World Championships: In her opening race in Schladming, Austria, Vonn crashed hard during the super-G and needed to be airlifted off the mountain to a nearby hospital. Doctors diagnosed her with tears of the medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligaments in her right knee and a fractured tibial plateau, all of which resulted in season-ending surgery.

2011 World Championships: One week before the start of competition, Vonn crashed during giant slalom training in Kintereit, Austria. Although she walked away from the incident with no major injuries, she did suffer a concussion in the collision. After much debate, she decided to compete in Garmish-Partenkirchen where she finished second in the downhill and seventh in super-G.

2010 Olympics: Vonn came to the Vancouver Games banged up, having bruised her right shin during pre-Olympic workouts in Austria. Putting on a ski boot resulted in “excruciating” pain, but she competed through it and won gold in the downhill and bronze in the super-G. Vonn crashed during the giant slalom, breaking her right pinkie, and then crashed out of the slalom run of the super-combined competition.

2009-10 World Cup: Just weeks before the Olympics, Vonn suffered a violent crash during her first giant slalom run in Lienz, Austria. She was taken to the hospital where doctors diagnosed her with swelling and microfractures in her left forearm. She continued to ski after the injury.

2009 World Championships: In perhaps the most bizarre injury of Vonn’s career, she sliced open her right thumb on a broken champagne bottle while celebrating her victory in the downhill in Val d’Isere, France. The incident left her with a cut tendon, which required surgery, but did not prevent her from skiing the remainder of that season. She went on to earn nine World Cup podium finishes.

2007 World Championships: The technical events continued to cause Vonn trouble in Are, Sweden where she crashed in a slalom training run and suffered a season-ending ACL sprain. Fortunately for her, she won silver medals in the downhill and super-G prior to the crash.

2006 Olympics: Vonn’s second Olympic appearance did not get off to a good start as she crashed during a downhill training run and was airlifted by helicopter off the mountain in Torino. The incident left her with a bruised hip but did not knock her from the Games. Two days later, she finished eighth in the downhill.

VIDEO: Vonn meets Ingemar Stenmark

Israel is first nation to qualify for 2020 Olympic baseball tournament

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Israel’s baseball team, which captivated at the 2017 World Baseball Classic, is headed to its first Olympics next summer.

Israel won a joint European-African tournament to become the first nation to qualify for baseball’s return to the Games after the sport was voted off the program after Beijing 2008.

It joins host nation Japan. Four more countries will qualify — two at the global Premier12 in November, another from the Americas and one more from a last-chance qualifier next year.

Israel, ranked 19th in the world, advanced via its best opportunity in Italy this week. It upset the highest-ranked European nations — the Netherlands (No. 8) and host Italy (No. 16) — and wrapped it up with an 11-1 win over South Africa on Sunday.

Its run came two years after Israel, then ranked 41st, beat South Korea, Chinese Taipei, the Netherlands and Cuba before bowing out of the World Baseball Classic. And one week after Israel finished fourth at the European Championship.

Israel’s roster at this week’s Olympic qualifier lacked many of the MLB veterans that it had at the World Baseball Classic. Israeli citizenship was not required at the WBC.

Its most recognizable player is Danny Valencia, an infielder who played parts of nine MLB seasons from 2010-18.

MLB players are unlikely to feature at the Tokyo Games, but minor leaguers are expected to be eligible as in the past.

The rest of the Olympic field is likely to be nations from North America (such as the U.S., Cuba, Mexico or Canada) or Asia (South Korea, Chinese Taipei) or Australia.

Baseball will not be on the 2024 Olympic program but could be added for the 2028 Los Angeles Games.

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J’den Cox repeats as world wrestling champion; Kyle Snyder stunned

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If he wasn’t crowned already, it’s clear U.S. wrestling has a new king.

On a day when Rio Olympic champion Kyle Snyder was upset and London Olympic champ Jordan Burroughs rallied for another bronze medal, J’den Cox repeated as world champion in Kazakhstan.

Cox, the Rio Olympic 86kg bronze medalist, completed a perfect run through the 92kg division — not giving up a point in four matches — by dominating Iranian Alireza Karimi 4-0 in the final. He became the second U.S. man to win an Olympic or world title without surrendering a point in more than 30 years (joining Kyle Dake from last year).

“I don’t know why, but it feels like a ton better [than 2018],” said Cox, whose tattoos include one that reads in Latin, “If I cannot move heaven, I will raise hell.” “I made more sacrifices … I wanted to do it better.”

Earlier Saturday, Snyder was shocked by Azerbaijan’s Sharif Sharifov 5-2 in the 97kg semifinals, denying a third straight world final between Snyder and Russian Tank Abdulrashid Sadulayev. Sharifov, the 2012 Olympic 84kg champ, clinched his first world medal in eight years.

Snyder, who in Rio became the youngest U.S. Olympic wrestling champion at age 20, failed to make an Olympic or world final for the first time in his career. He will wrestle for bronze on Sunday, while Sharifov meets Sadulayev for gold.

Burroughs earned his seventh straight world championships medal and second straight bronze. Burroughs, the 2012 Olympic 74kg champion, rebounded from losing to Russian Zaurbeck Sidakov on Friday with a 10-0 technical fall over Japanese Mao Okui.

Burroughs gave up a lead on Sidakov with 1.3 seconds left in the semifinals, a year after Sidakov overtook him as time expired in the quarterfinals.

“A lot of people in 2016 called me a quitter,” said Burroughs, who tearfully missed the medals in Rio, “and I think that after watching the amount of devastation and heartbreak that I’ve taken over the last two years and still being able to come back and take third place is a testament.”

Burroughs, 31, shares third with Adeline Gray on the U.S. list of career world wrestling championships medals, trailing only Bruce Baumgartner and Kristie Davis, who each earned nine.

Burroughs’ bronze ensured he gets a bye into the 74kg final of the Olympic trials in April. But this will be the first time he goes into an Olympic year as anything other than a reigning world champion.

“At this juncture of my career, I feel I’m running out of time,” said Burroughs, who next year will be older than any previous U.S. Olympic wrestling champion. “That can be really scary.”

Dake marched to Sunday’s final in defense of his 2018 World title at 79kg (a non-Olympic weight) by going 23-4 over three matches. Dake, who at Cornell became the only wrestler to win NCAA titles at four weight classes or without a redshirt, gets Azerbaijan’s Jabrayil Hasanov in the final, a rematch of the 2018 gold-medal match.

Next year, Dake must move up to 86kg, where Cox will likely reside, or down to 74kg, where Burroughs has won every U.S. Olympic or world trials dating to 2011. There’s also David Taylor to reckon with. Taylor won the 86kg world title last year but missed this season due to injury.

“We’ve got a guy at 79 kilos that’s going to win a world championship tomorrow,” Burroughs said, smiling, of Dake, “I’m hopefully going to be waiting for [Dake at Olympic trials], healthy and prepared.”

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