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Michelle Kwan reflects on Nagano, 20 years later

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NBCOlympics.com caught up with 1998 Olympic figure skating silver medalist Michelle Kwan to ask her to reflect on her memories from Nagano.

At NBCOlympics we’re big on anniversaries. Can you believe it’s gonna be 20 years?

Don’t say that!

I won’t say the number, but it’s a big anniversary.

It’s amazing. The Olympic Games is one of those moments that you remember forever. From the moment that you step foot in the country that you’re competing in to the Closing Ceremony. It’s the highlight. When I look back at my life, my career, I’m sure it’s gonna be one of those highlights that you never forget.

Do you have a favorite memory from being there?

Oh. The moment I stepped foot on the Olympic ice, and skating over the Olympic rings, I started to cry. I like, you know you dream of going to the Olympics, and then you finally make it happen, and then you skate over the rings, you’re like, “It’s happening.” But I actually skated to the boards, and my coach was like, he was basically like slapping, like “Wake up!” I still have a job to do.

NBCOlympics.com: Watch figure skating streams, highlights

How did you overcome that? How did you get rid of the tears and get ready to go?

You train your whole life for it and you have to realize you still have a job to do. I think it’s a quick reality. I’m glad I got it over with before I stepped on the ice when I was competing.

So since then, are you talking smack with Tara or anything?

Oh, no, I mean, the thing is, I think what the media likes to play up is this like rivalry between athletes. When in fact, you’re only competing against yourself and you’re trying to do your very best. In figure skating, you have four minutes to do your best. It’s your time, you do your best. You know? As opposed to – it’s not a tennis match. I’m not directly against a person. I’m there to do my best.

Did you get to do anything fun away from the competition while you were there?

I mean, because the ladies compete at the very end, it’s the last event. It’s tough to be like having fun and partying. When people talk about the Village, you do get a chance to meet interesting people from different countries, and build those friendships that last for a lifetime. I’ve been to the World Women’s Sports Foundation for years, and it’s like, this is friends that I’ll in touch with for the rest of my life.

NBCOlympics.com: Calgary ’88 (documentary)

Will you do anything fun to celebrate the anniversary in February?

I haven’t thought about it but now you’ve, like, got me thinking. I’ve got to do something big.

When was the last time you watched it all the way through?  

I can’t actually tell you. I don’t know. I don’t know. It’s not like every day you like watch YouTube and you’re kind of like, “Oh. This is what I used to do!” You were there. So it’s like, you have those memories.

Tags:Figure Skating

WATCH LIVE: French Open on NBC, streaming

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NBC’s coverage of the French Open begins Sunday at 12 p.m. ET, streaming on NBCSports.com/live and the NBC Sports app.

WATCH LIVE: French Open, Rd. 1 — STREAM LINK

Notables in action on the first day at Roland Garros include Venus Williams, 2017 French Open winner Jelena Ostapenko and No. 2 men’s seed Alexander Zverev.

Williams, 37, is the oldest woman in the draw. She reached the fourth round the last two years, her best results in Paris since her last quarterfinal in 2006. The seven-time major champion has reached one French Open final, losing to little sister Serena Williams in 2002.

Ted Robinson handles play-by-play for NBC’s coverage, joined by analysts John McEnroe and Mary Carillo. This is NBC’s 36th straight year broadcasting the French Open.

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FRENCH OPEN: TV/Stream Schedule | ScoresMen’s Draw (PDF) | Women’s Draw (PDF) 

17-year-old runs 3:52 mile at Pre Classic

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Jakob Ingebrigtsen, a 17-year-old Norwegian, clocked 3:52.28 at the Prefontaine Classic on Saturday, faster than Alan Webb‘s U.S. high school record set at Pre in 2001.

“My goal was to take Alan Webb’s record,” Ingebrigtsen told media in Eugene, Ore.

It’s the second-fastest mile in history recorded by somebody younger than 18, according to the IAAF. Qatar’s Hamza Driouch ran 3:50.90 in 2012, clocked two months before two years of his results would be annulled by a doping ban.

Webb famously ran 3:53.43 as an 18-year-old at Pre in 2001, which led to him appearing on “Late Show with David Letterman.”

Ingebrigtsen, who ran 3:58 at Pre last year to become the youngest sub-4-minute miler in history, finished fourth in a field of the world’s best middle-distance runners. His two older brothers, Filip and Henrik, are also middle-distance runners (but weren’t in Saturday’s race).

Ingebrigtsen beat Olympic 1500m champion Matthew Centrowitz (fifth) and Olympic 800m bronze medalist Clayton Murphy (sixth) in the Bowerman Mile. The race’s second-place finisher is 18 years old — Ethiopian Samuel Tefera ran 3:51.26

Webb was at Saturday’s meet, in part to award the 400th man to run a sub-4-minute mile in Pre Classic history.

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VIDEO: Kenyan star nearly falls, comes back to win Pre Classic 800m