Why Tara and Johnny are pumped for the Olympics

Johnny Weir, Tara Lipinski
file
0 Comments

Tara Lipinski and Johnny Weir have been to the “Happiest Place on Earth,” but for one month, every four years, another city can say they too own that title. This year, that city is PyeongChang, South Korea – home of the 2018 Olympic Winter Games and a place where many athletes are hoping to make their dreams come true.

The figure skating competition gets underway Thursday, Feb. 8 live in Primetime on NBC and NBCOlympics.com. Olympians-turned-analysts Tara Lipinski and Johnny Weir can hardly contain their excitement.

Lipinski said in a recent NBC media call that she was as excited about PyeongChang 2018 as when she struck gold at the 1998 Olympics in Nagano, Japan.

“It’s the moment that you walk into an Olympic arena that it feels so much bigger than any other event that I’ve ever participated in, competed in or have been an analyst for.”

Two-time Olympian Johnny Weir has been a broadcaster at three Games, and said every one of them feels special in their own way.

NBCOlympics.com: Watch/stream the team event men’s, pairs’ short program

​”I think it’s a huge honor and privilege to be able to shape the stories of young athletes who compete in these sports that many people only pay attention to every four years.”

Unlike some other sports in the Olympics where people can watch them pretty frequently, this is figure skating’s big stage. All eyes will be on the athletes, this is their time to shine.

Tara and Johnny know firsthand how these athletes are feeling. The nerves, the excitement, stepping out onto the ice for the first time. They’ve been there, done that.

“We’ve been those skaters in the little niche sport that people only watch every four years,” Weir said. “So, for us, it’s a big responsibility and a major honor to be able to craft those stories.”

Now instead of nailing that triple Axel, their responsibility turns to telling the viewers at home the stories behind these athletes, teaching them about the sport and why it is so unique.

“We’re that unique sport where you are judged half on your technical skill and half on your artistic skill,” Lipinski added. “Especially when it comes to something like artistry that can be a very personal preference.”

Not only are Tara and Johnny excited for the competition to get underway, but they are excited to be working with one another.

“That’s why she’s been so great as a broadcaster and as an athlete. She makes me up my game which really means that Tara’s a great partner,” Weir said of his friend and fellow podcast host.

Lipinski summed it up:

“The Olympics are magic, and I can’t wait to be part of it.”

Olympian Derrick Mein ends U.S. men’s trap drought at shotgun worlds

Derrick Mein
Getty
0 Comments

Tokyo Olympian Derrick Mein became the first U.S. male shooter to win a world title in the trap event since 1966, prevailing at the world shotgun championships in Osijek, Croatia, on Wednesday.

Mein, who grew up on a small farm in Southeast Kansas, hunting deer and quail, nearly squandered a place in the final when he missed his last three shots in the semifinal round after hitting his first 22. He rallied in a sudden-death shoot-off for the last spot in the final by hitting all five of his targets.

He hit 33 of 34 targets in the final to win by two over Brit Nathan Hales with one round to spare.

The last U.S. man to win an Olympic trap title was Donald Haldeman in 1976.

Mein, 37, was 24th in his Olympic debut in Tokyo (and placed 13th with Kayle Browning in the mixed-gender team event).

The U.S. swept the Tokyo golds in the other shotgun event — skeet — with Vincent Hancock and Amber English. Browning took silver in women’s trap.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

Mo Farah withdraws before London Marathon

Mo Farah
Getty
0 Comments

British track legend Mo Farah withdrew before Sunday’s London Marathon, citing a right hip injury before what would have been his first 26.2-mile race in nearly two years.

Farah, who swept the 2012 and 2016 Olympic track titles at 5000m and 10,000m, said he hoped “to be back out there” next April, when the London Marathon returns to its traditional month after COVID moved it to the fall for three consecutive years. Farah turns 40 on March 23.

“I’ve been training really hard over the past few months and I’d got myself back into good shape and was feeling pretty optimistic about being able to put in a good performance,” in London, Farah said in a press release. “However, over the past 10 days I’ve been feeling pain and tightness in my right hip. I’ve had extensive physio and treatment and done everything I can to be on the start line, but it hasn’t improved enough to compete on Sunday.”

Farah switched from the track to the marathon after the 2017 World Championships and won the 2018 Chicago Marathon in a then-European record time of 2:05:11. Belgium’s Bashir Abdi now holds the record at 2:03:36.

Farah returned to the track in a failed bid to qualify for the Tokyo Olympics, then shifted back to the roads.

Sunday’s London Marathon men’s race is headlined by Ethiopians Kenenisa Bekele and Birhanu Legese, the second- and third-fastest marathoners in history.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!