YUNA KIM
Getty Images

Yuna Kim lives a dream with lighting of Olympic cauldron

1 Comment

PYEONGCHANG, South Korea – They chose to share stories of Yuna Kim’s difficult times.

“Maybe my favorite memory of skating with Yuna was right before she went to the [2010] Olympics,” said U.S. figure skater Adam Rippon, who shared a coach, Brian Orser, with Kim in 2009 and 2010. “We had lunch with Yuna and Brian. And Brian sat down and said, ‘You know what, we’ve done all the work, we’re ready to go.’ And I remember she just did a simulation [of her programs]. She didn’t skate very well. And she was like, ‘Yeah, I’m ready.’ I was like, oh, wow, she feels great. I think that was my favorite memory. … I just saw it in her eyes that she was ready.”

Orser, too, recently recalled one of those times training in Toronto before the Vancouver Games.

“We were having a rough day, and I think it was just the two of us on the ice, but I just took her to the middle of the ice, and she’s got her manager downstairs and her mother and her trainer, and everybody seems to be an expert in the Olympics, but I just said, ‘I’m the only person in this rink that knows how you feel,’” said the Canadian Orser, who like Kim skated with the hopes of a nation on his shoulders at the 1988 Calgary Games. “I know what you’re feeling, I know what you’re going through, and my job is to take some of that on, and I really get it with you. … Then I could hear her shoulders drop, and she could take a deep breath because then we were in it together, so it’s not just her and Korea and the Olympics.”

It was Kim, South Korea and the Olympics at 10:10 p.m. in PyeongChang Olympic Stadium on Friday. Temperatures were in the high 20s. It felt like the warmest evening of the week.

As the 35,000-capacity stadium could have predicted, the iconic figure skater lit the cauldron, the symbolic opening of the Games. In a long white dress and skates on a tiny sheet of ice, she became the first woman given the honor alone since 2006 and the youngest solo lighter since 1994.

Kim’s moment was nearly seven years in the making. In spring 2011, she began a 19-month break from competition, in part to lend a hand to the PyeongChang Olympic bid in its final stages.

Terrence Burns, an Atlanta native, was the lead bid strategist for PyeongChang.

VIDEO: Best moments from the Opening Ceremony

He had actually served in that role for the Vancouver 2010 and Sochi 2014 bids, which edged PyeongChang by three and four votes, respectively, in the previous two host city votes. The third PyeongChang bid needed some native athlete star power after trotting out Italian skier Alberto Tomba in its last defeat.

Lightning struck between its second and third bids. Kim became world champion in 2009 and Olympic champion in the Winter Games’ marquee event in 2010.

In 2009, Forbes Korea named her the No. 1 celebrity in the country based on professionalism, popularity, income and influence. She traveled with two bodyguards.

“We knew we were going to use Yuna,” Burns recalled this week. “Everybody was pressuring me to use her. I was getting a lot of pressure to use her early, that we weren’t good enough [without her].”

Burns welcomed the addition of a woman whose popularity was likened as part-Elvis, part-Jordan in South Korea.

The two losing PyeongChang bids stressed peace on the Korean peninsula, even reunification.

“She’s exactly what we were trying to express in breaking the stereotype of the previous two bids,” Burns said. “She was young, worldly. She represented the new Korea, which we were desperately trying to get across. It wasn’t old Korean men in suits on stage anymore.

“She personified that. It’s why we saved her to the end, actually.”

Burns was convinced that the third bid, going against Munich and Annecy, France, was strong enough without Kim to just about reach the finish line. The figure skater could help put it over the top.

After Kim took silver at the 2011 World Championships (donating her winnings to Japanese tsunami relief), Burns had fewer than two months to prepare her to speak at the IOC base in Lausanne in May. Seven weeks after that was the final presentation and vote.

PHOTOS: Best images from the Opening Ceremony

“You’re trying to test her English without being blatant about it,” said Burns, who added that he wrote every word of every speech at those last two presentations. “Her English was perfect. She was poised, well put together.

“She probably didn’t need a lot of practice, but she was always asking for more. I want to do it again. I want to do it again. She really got it. She understood what was at stake. She understood this was a little different than getting paid for a commercial. This was for the country. She was just endearing. She was humble, truly.”

The bid team flew to Togo in between Lausanne and the July 6 finale and vote in Durban, South Africa. Burns thought it was Kim’s first trip without her mom.

That could have given him pause to think that this 20-year-old was essentially the bid’s closer in front of some 100 IOC members.

“I remember trying to tell her to employ that charm that she has on the ice,” he said. “This is an exercise in supplication.

“This is very unlike any speech you’ve ever given. It’s not a speech to corporate leaders or why you became Olympic champion. This is a persuasive emotional argument.”

In Durban, Kim delivered a three-minute, English-only address with poise and precision.

“I’ve been training harder for today than for most of my competitions,” Kim said on stage before lifting her right hand and pinching her index finger and thumb together for this next line: “I’m still a little bit nervous. You are making history today, and I get to be a small part of it.”

Kim said she was an example of a living legacy of advancing winter sports in her country. She said awarding the first Winter Games to South Korea would give hope that Olympic hopefuls wouldn’t have to travel halfway around the world to train.

MORE: Yuna Kim’s evolving Olympic role

The athlete turned ambassador.

“For her to do that in English, I don’t think she’d ever done it before, that kind of speech, a powerful, emotional speech,” Burns said. “We worked on eye contact, smiling in the right place, being self-effacing, being sweet. You only have to tell her once, and she got it.”

Kim cried after then-IOC president Jacques Rogge announced PyeongChang as the winner. She was standing next to the South Korean president and PyeongChang bid chairman.

“We all had tears in our eyes,” Burns said. “She’s used to making history, but it was a different way of making history.”

A Gallup Korea poll resulted in 46.5 percent of people saying Kim played the most important role in the victory, according to Yonhap News Agency.

Burns wouldn’t put it all on Kim. He said the other bedrock was Theresa Rah, the bid communications director and former TV personality who spoke in both Olympic languages (French and English) in her Durban speech.

But what Kim did at her age, in the middle of her athletic career, is almost unparalleled.

Burns said it reminded him of his friend Janet Evans, passing the 1996 Olympic flame to Muhammad Ali in Atlanta.

“She has to feel that not only part of Olympic history because of what she’s done,” Burns said, “but part of Korean history in a way that’s unassailable.”

Nick McCarvel contributed reporting to this column.

Gregorio Paltrinieri swims second-fastest 1500m freestyle in history

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Olympic champion Gregorio Paltrinieri swam the second-fastest 1500m freestyle in history, clocking 14:33.10 in his native Italy on Thursday.

Paltrinieri, 25, missed Chinese Sun Yang‘s world record from the 2012 Olympics by 2.08 seconds.

The Italian now owns the second- and third-fastest times in history, including his 14:34.10 from the 2016 European Championships, also held at the 2012 Olympic pool in London.

Paltrinieri is a versatile distance swimmer. At last year’s world championships, he finished sixth in the open-water 10km to qualify for the Olympics, then won the 800m free in the pool in a European record time and finished with 1500m bronze, just missing a third straight world title in that event.

German Florian Wellbrock won the 1500m in 14:36.54 at worlds, with Paltrinieri finishing 2.21 seconds back.

Sun, 28, was in February banned eight years stemming from destroying a drug-test sample with a hammer in September 2018. Sun, who focused more on the 200m and 400m frees in recent years, did not race the 1500m at the 2017 or 2019 Worlds.

Top-level swim meets in the U.S. are scheduled to resume in November with the Tyr Pro Series.

MORE: Michael Phelps qualifies for first Olympics at age 15

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

Bianca Andreescu to miss U.S. Open

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Bianca Andreescu withdrew from the U.S. Open, citing “unforeseen challenges, including the Covid pandemic” compromising her ability to prepare to defend her Grand Slam title.

“I have taken this step in order to focus on my match fitness and ensure that I return ready to play at my highest level,” Andreescu, a 20-year-old Canadian, posted on social media. “The US Open victory last year has been the high point of my career thus far and I will miss not being there. However, I realize that the unforeseen challenges, including the Covid pandemic, have compromised my ability to prepare and compete to the degree necessary to play at my highest level.”

Andreescu’s absence means the U.S. Open, the first Grand Slam tournament since tennis resumed amid the coronavirus pandemic, will be without both 2019 male and female singles champions.

Rafael Nadal previously announced he would not defend his title, saying he would rather not travel given the global situation. Roger Federer is also out after knee surgery. Women’s No. 1 Ash Barty didn’t enter, either, citing travel concerns.

Last year, Andreescu made her U.S. Open title run as the 15th seed, sweeping Serena Williams in the final. Ranked 208th a year earlier, she became the first player born in the 2000s to win a Slam and the first teen Slam winner since Maria Sharapova at the 2006 U.S. Open.

Andreescu then missed the Australian Open in January due to rehab from a knee injury that forced her to retire during a match at the WTA Finals on Oct. 30. She also missed the French Open and Wimbledon in 2019 following a rotator cuff tear.

MORE: Serena Williams, reclusive amid pandemic, returns to tennis competition

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!