YUNA KIM
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Yuna Kim lives a dream with lighting of Olympic cauldron

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PYEONGCHANG, South Korea – They chose to share stories of Yuna Kim’s difficult times.

“Maybe my favorite memory of skating with Yuna was right before she went to the [2010] Olympics,” said U.S. figure skater Adam Rippon, who shared a coach, Brian Orser, with Kim in 2009 and 2010. “We had lunch with Yuna and Brian. And Brian sat down and said, ‘You know what, we’ve done all the work, we’re ready to go.’ And I remember she just did a simulation [of her programs]. She didn’t skate very well. And she was like, ‘Yeah, I’m ready.’ I was like, oh, wow, she feels great. I think that was my favorite memory. … I just saw it in her eyes that she was ready.”

Orser, too, recently recalled one of those times training in Toronto before the Vancouver Games.

“We were having a rough day, and I think it was just the two of us on the ice, but I just took her to the middle of the ice, and she’s got her manager downstairs and her mother and her trainer, and everybody seems to be an expert in the Olympics, but I just said, ‘I’m the only person in this rink that knows how you feel,’” said the Canadian Orser, who like Kim skated with the hopes of a nation on his shoulders at the 1988 Calgary Games. “I know what you’re feeling, I know what you’re going through, and my job is to take some of that on, and I really get it with you. … Then I could hear her shoulders drop, and she could take a deep breath because then we were in it together, so it’s not just her and Korea and the Olympics.”

It was Kim, South Korea and the Olympics at 10:10 p.m. in PyeongChang Olympic Stadium on Friday. Temperatures were in the high 20s. It felt like the warmest evening of the week.

As the 35,000-capacity stadium could have predicted, the iconic figure skater lit the cauldron, the symbolic opening of the Games. In a long white dress and skates on a tiny sheet of ice, she became the first woman given the honor alone since 2006 and the youngest solo lighter since 1994.

Kim’s moment was nearly seven years in the making. In spring 2011, she began a 19-month break from competition, in part to lend a hand to the PyeongChang Olympic bid in its final stages.

Terrence Burns, an Atlanta native, was the lead bid strategist for PyeongChang.

VIDEO: Best moments from the Opening Ceremony

He had actually served in that role for the Vancouver 2010 and Sochi 2014 bids, which edged PyeongChang by three and four votes, respectively, in the previous two host city votes. The third PyeongChang bid needed some native athlete star power after trotting out Italian skier Alberto Tomba in its last defeat.

Lightning struck between its second and third bids. Kim became world champion in 2009 and Olympic champion in the Winter Games’ marquee event in 2010.

In 2009, Forbes Korea named her the No. 1 celebrity in the country based on professionalism, popularity, income and influence. She traveled with two bodyguards.

“We knew we were going to use Yuna,” Burns recalled this week. “Everybody was pressuring me to use her. I was getting a lot of pressure to use her early, that we weren’t good enough [without her].”

Burns welcomed the addition of a woman whose popularity was likened as part-Elvis, part-Jordan in South Korea.

The two losing PyeongChang bids stressed peace on the Korean peninsula, even reunification.

“She’s exactly what we were trying to express in breaking the stereotype of the previous two bids,” Burns said. “She was young, worldly. She represented the new Korea, which we were desperately trying to get across. It wasn’t old Korean men in suits on stage anymore.

“She personified that. It’s why we saved her to the end, actually.”

Burns was convinced that the third bid, going against Munich and Annecy, France, was strong enough without Kim to just about reach the finish line. The figure skater could help put it over the top.

After Kim took silver at the 2011 World Championships (donating her winnings to Japanese tsunami relief), Burns had fewer than two months to prepare her to speak at the IOC base in Lausanne in May. Seven weeks after that was the final presentation and vote.

PHOTOS: Best images from the Opening Ceremony

“You’re trying to test her English without being blatant about it,” said Burns, who added that he wrote every word of every speech at those last two presentations. “Her English was perfect. She was poised, well put together.

“She probably didn’t need a lot of practice, but she was always asking for more. I want to do it again. I want to do it again. She really got it. She understood what was at stake. She understood this was a little different than getting paid for a commercial. This was for the country. She was just endearing. She was humble, truly.”

The bid team flew to Togo in between Lausanne and the July 6 finale and vote in Durban, South Africa. Burns thought it was Kim’s first trip without her mom.

That could have given him pause to think that this 20-year-old was essentially the bid’s closer in front of some 100 IOC members.

“I remember trying to tell her to employ that charm that she has on the ice,” he said. “This is an exercise in supplication.

“This is very unlike any speech you’ve ever given. It’s not a speech to corporate leaders or why you became Olympic champion. This is a persuasive emotional argument.”

In Durban, Kim delivered a three-minute, English-only address with poise and precision.

“I’ve been training harder for today than for most of my competitions,” Kim said on stage before lifting her right hand and pinching her index finger and thumb together for this next line: “I’m still a little bit nervous. You are making history today, and I get to be a small part of it.”

Kim said she was an example of a living legacy of advancing winter sports in her country. She said awarding the first Winter Games to South Korea would give hope that Olympic hopefuls wouldn’t have to travel halfway around the world to train.

MORE: Yuna Kim’s evolving Olympic role

The athlete turned ambassador.

“For her to do that in English, I don’t think she’d ever done it before, that kind of speech, a powerful, emotional speech,” Burns said. “We worked on eye contact, smiling in the right place, being self-effacing, being sweet. You only have to tell her once, and she got it.”

Kim cried after then-IOC president Jacques Rogge announced PyeongChang as the winner. She was standing next to the South Korean president and PyeongChang bid chairman.

“We all had tears in our eyes,” Burns said. “She’s used to making history, but it was a different way of making history.”

A Gallup Korea poll resulted in 46.5 percent of people saying Kim played the most important role in the victory, according to Yonhap News Agency.

Burns wouldn’t put it all on Kim. He said the other bedrock was Theresa Rah, the bid communications director and former TV personality who spoke in both Olympic languages (French and English) in her Durban speech.

But what Kim did at her age, in the middle of her athletic career, is almost unparalleled.

Burns said it reminded him of his friend Janet Evans, passing the 1996 Olympic flame to Muhammad Ali in Atlanta.

“She has to feel that not only part of Olympic history because of what she’s done,” Burns said, “but part of Korean history in a way that’s unassailable.”

Nick McCarvel contributed reporting to this column.

Tadej Pogacar stuns Primoz Roglic, set to win Tour de France

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Tadej Pogacar overtook countryman Primoz Roglic and is set to become the youngest Tour de France champion since 1904, the second-youngest in history and the first Slovenian champion.

Pogacar, who turns 22 on Monday, overcame a 57-second deficit to Roglic and won Saturday’s penultimate stage, a 22-mile time trial with a finishing four-mile climb. He is 59 seconds ahead of Roglic after three weeks and 84 hours of total racing.

“Actually, my dream was just to be [in] the Tour de France,” Pogacar said. “I cannot believe it, and if you ask me in one week, one month, I will still not believe it, probably.”

Pogacar won the stage by 81 seconds, greater than the margin separating second place from eighth place after 55 minutes on the roads. Roglic was fifth.

It’s reminiscent of American Greg LeMond surpassing Frenchman Laurent Fignon in the time trial finale of the 1989 Tour.

That final margin was the closest in Tour history — eight seconds. This one would be the 11th time in Tour history that the difference is less than a minute, according to ProCyclingStats.com.

“I struggled with everything, just not enough power,” Roglic said. “I was just more and more without the power that I obviously needed. I was just really giving everything till the end.”

Australian Richie Porte will join Pogacar and Roglic on the podium after moving up from fourth place going into the time trial. Colombian Miguel Angel Lopez, who came into the day in third, dropped to sixth.

It’s the first time since 2007 that everybody on the final Tour de France podium will be there for the first time.

TOUR DE FRANCE: Standings | TV, Stream Schedule | Stage By Stage

Sunday’s finale is the traditional ceremonial ride into Paris where the overall leaders don’t attack each other.

Pogacar is riding his first Tour de France and in his second season as a professional cyclist with a World Tour team.

Last September, he finished third in the Vuelta a Espana, one of three Grand Tours, which Roglic won. At the time, Pogacar became the youngest Grand Tour podium finisher since 1974.

“I knew that I can be with the best, that I can follow,” after the Vuelta, Pogacar said, “but I never thought that I would win already this year, especially in this season that was really strange.”

UAE Team Emirates initially planned to use Pogacar to support Fabio Aru, but the Slovenian’s continued emergence changed the plan.

“I’m going [to the Tour] firstly to learn,” Pogacar said in May. “But if I have a chance to show what I can do, I will.”

Pogacar was Robin to Roglic’s Batman for most of this Tour.

Roglic wore the yellow jersey as race leader the last two weeks. heading the dominant Jumbo-Visma team. Pogacar donned the white jersey for the highest-placed rider 25 and under, though he was on a weaker team.

But when they went head-to-head on climbs, Pogacar usually stuck with Roglic, sometimes riding away from him.

When it came down to the final climb on Saturday, with no team support in what they call the race of truth, Pogacar showed who was the strongest Slovenian.

“[Roglic] was really superior through the whole Tour,” Pogacar said. “He must be devastated, but that’s bike racing, I guess. Today I beat him, and that was it.”

MORE: USA Cycling names Olympic team finalists

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2020 Tour de France standings

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2020 Tour de France standings for the yellow jersey, green jersey, white jersey and polka-dot jersey through stage 20 of 21 …

Overall (Yellow Jersey)
1. Tadej Pogacar (SLO) — 84:26:33
2. Primoz Roglic (SLO) — +:59
3. Richie Porte (AUS) — +3:30
4. Mikel Landa (ESP) — +5:58
5. Enric Mas (ESP) — +6:07
6. Miguel Angel Lopez (COL) — +6:47
7. Tom Dumoulin (NED) — +7:48
8. Rigberto Uran (COL) — +8:02
9. Adam Yates (GBR) — +9:25
10. Damiano Caruso (ITA) — +14:03
13. Richard Carapaz (ECU) — +24:44
15. Sepp Kuss (USA) — +42:20
17. Nairo Quintana (COL) — +1:02:46
29. Thibaut Pinot (FRA) — +1:59:33
36. Julian Alaphilippe (FRA) — +2:17:41
DNF. Egan Bernal (COL)

Sprinters (Green Jersey)
1. Sam Bennett (IRL) — 319 points
2. Peter Sagan (SVK) — 264
3. Matteo Trentin (ITA) — 250
4. Bryan Coquard (FRA) — 173
5. Caleb Ewan (AUS) — 158

Climbers (Polka-Dot Jersey)
1. Tadej Pogacar (SLO) — 82 points
2. Richard Carapaz (ECU) — 74
3. Primoz Roglic (SLO) — 67
4. Marc Hirschi (SUI) — 62
5. Miguel Angel Lopez (COL) — 51

Young Rider (White Jersey)
1. Tadej Pogacar (SLO) — 84:26:33
2. Enric Mas (ESP) — +6:07
3. Valentin Madouas (FRA) — +1:42:22
4. Dani Martinez (COL) — +1:54:51
5. Lennard Kamna (GER) — +2:14:33

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