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How Olympic golf fields would look today

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With it being Masters week and the Olympic golf qualifying process remaining largely the same, according to Golf Channel, who would make the 60-golfer fields for Tokyo 2020 using today’s rankings?

Well, one of the six medalists from Rio, American bronze medalist Matt Kuchar, would not qualify outright if using the same maximum two-per-country rule (or up to four if inside the top 15 in world rankings).

Tiger Woods has posted impressive early comeback results from major back surgery but, at No. 103, is 95 places shy of making a U.S. team outright.

Woods would make a hypothetical Olympic field today if he was from any country except the U.S., Spain, Great Britain, Sweden, Australia, South Africa, Japan, Ireland, South Korea and India.

That all said, none of the results that went into today’s rankings (nor this weekend’s Masters results) will play any part in Olympic golf qualification, which go by the rolling, two-year world rankings in June 2020.

A look at the fields today if using the same system as for Rio 2016:

Men
1. Dustin Johnson (USA-1)
2. Justin Thomas (USA-2)
3. Jon Rahm (ESP-1)
4. Jordan Spieth (USA-3)
5. Justin Rose (GBR-1)
6. Hideki Matsuyama (JPN-1)
7. Rory McIlroy (IRL-1) — Said in 2017 he will likely skip the Olympics
8. Rickie Fowler (USA-4)
9. Sergio Garcia (ESP-2)
10. Jason Day (AUS-1)
11. Tommy Fleetwood (GBR-2)
12. Paul Casey (GBR-3)
13. Henrik Stenson (SWE-1)
14. Alex Noren (SWE-2)
15. Marc Leishman (AUS-2)
16. Francesco Molinari (ITA-1)
17. Kiradech Aphibarnrat (THA-1)
18. Louis Oosthuizen (RSA-1)
19. Branden Grace (RSA-2)
20. Li Haotong (CHN-1)
21. Adan Hadwin (CAN-1)
22. Thomas Pietres (BEL-1)
23. Satoshi Kodaira (JPN-2)
24. Siwoo Kim (KOR-1)
25. Jhonattan Vegas (VEN-1)
26. Bernd Wiesberger (AUT-1)
27. Alexander Levy (FRA-1)
28. Emiliano Grillo (ARG-1)
29. Shubhankar Sharma (IND-1)
30. Joost Luiten (NED-1)
31. Paul Dunne (IRL-2)
32. Byeong Hun An (KOR-2)
33. Anirban Lahiri (IND-2)
34. Martin Kaymer (GER-1)
35. Thorbjorn Olesen (DEN-1)
36. Fabrizio Zanotti (PAR-1)
37. Victor Dubuisson (FRA-2)
38. Ryan Fox (NZL-1)
39. Graham Delaet (CAN-2)
40. Nicolas Colsaerts (BEL-2)
41. Jazz Janewattananond (THA-2)
42. Soren Kjeldsen (DEN-2)
43. Renato Paratore (ITA-2)
44. Danny Lee (NZL-2)
45. Gavin Green (MAS-1)
46. C.T. Pan (TPE-1)
47. Abraham Ancer (MEX-1)
48. Tapio Pulkkanen (FIN-1)
49. Mikko Korhonen (FIN-2)
50. Alex Cejka (GER-2)
51. Scott Vincent (ZIM-1)
52. Andres Romero (ARG-2)
53. Miguel Tabuena (PHI-1)
54. Xinjun Zhang (CHN-2)
55. Rafael Campos (PUR-1)
56. Jose de Jesus Rodriguez (MEX-2)
57. Juvic Pagunsan (PHI-2)
58. Adison da Silva (BRA-1)
59. Juan Sebastian Munoz (COL-1)
60. Ricardo Gouveia (POR-1)
Notables missing: Phil Mickelson (USA-6), Bubba Watson (USA-7), Matt Kuchar (USA-8), Tiger Woods (USA-51), Adam Scott (AUS-4), Ian Poulter (GBR-5), Padraig Harrington (IRL-4), Vijay Singh (FIJ-1, ranked No. 518, cutoff is No. 386).

Women
1. Shanshan Feng (CHN-1)
2. Lexi Thompson (USA-1)
3. Inbee Park (KOR-1)
4. Sung Hyun Park (KOR-2)
5. So Yeon Ryu (KOR-3)
6. Ariya Jutanugarn (THA-1)
7. I.K. Kim (KOR-4)
8. Anna Nordqvist (SWE-1)
9. Cristie Kerr (USA-2)
10. Jessica Korda (USA-3)
11. Michelle Wie (USA-4)
12. Brooke Henderson (CAN-1)
13. Lydia Ko (NZL-1)
14. Minjee Lee (AUS-1)
15. Moriya Jutanugarn (THA-2)
16. Charley Hull (GBR-1)
17. Carlota Ciganda (ESP-1)
18. Ai Suzuki (JPN-1)
19. Pernilla Lindberg (SWE-2)
20. Georgia Hall (GBR-2)
21. Teresa Lu (TPE-1)
22. Suzann Pettersen (NOR-1)
23. Nasa Hataoka (JPN-2)
24. Caroline Masson (GER-1)
25. Katherine Kirk (AUS-2)
26. Karine Icher (FRA-1)
27. Azahara Munoz (ESP-2)
28. Wei-Ling Hsu (TPE-2)
29. Aditi Ashok (IND-1)
30. Nicole Larsen (DEN-1)
31. Haruka Morita-WanyaoLu (CHN-2)
32. Sandra Gal (GER-2)
33. Ashleigh Simon (RSA-1)
34. Alena Sharp (CAN-2)
35. Anne Van Dam (NED-1)
36. Gaby Lopez (MEX-1)
37. Nanna Koerstz Madsen (DEN-2)
38. Lee-Anne Pace (RSA-2)
39. Celine Boutier (FRA-2)
40. Laura Gonzalez Escallon (BEL-1)
41. Olafia Kristinsdottir (ISL-1)
42. Klara Spilkova (CZE-1)
43. Mariajo Uribe (COL-1)
44. Laetitia Beck (ISR-1)
45. Ursula Wikstrom (FIN-1)
46. Marianne Skarpnord (NOR-2)
47. Valdis Thora Jonsdottir (ISL-2)
48. Giulia Molinaro (ITA-1)
49. Ana Menendez (MEX-2)
50. Noora Tamminen (FIN-2)
51. Christine Wolf (AUT-1)
52. Sarah Schober (AUT-2)
53. Tiffany Chan (HKG-1)
54. Stephanie Meadow (IRL-1)
55. Maha Haddioui (MAR-1)
56. Daniela Darquea (ECU-1)
57. Diana Luna (ITA-2)
58. Dottie Ardina (PHI-1)
59. Kelly Tan (MAS-1)
60. Yuka Saso (PHI-2)
Notables missing: Stacy Lewis (USA-6), Paula Creamer (USA-32), Karrie Webb (AUS-6), Yani Tseng (TPE-7).

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Remco Evenepoel fractures pelvis in crash over bridge wall into ravine

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Belgian cyclist Remco Evenepoel fractured his pelvis crashing his bike and flipping over a bridge wall into a ravine at the Tour of Lombardy in Italy on Saturday.

Video showed Evenepoel, the 20-year-old world time trial silver medalist, being put in an ambulance on a stretcher minutes after the crash.

His team, Deceuninck-QuickStep, reported he remained conscious while being put on a stretcher, into an ambulance and taken to a hospital. He also suffered a right lung contusion.

In 2019, Evenepoel became the youngest-ever male podium finisher in a senior world road cycling championships event, according to Gracenote. In 2018, he swept the junior road race and time trial world titles.

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Noah Lyles raises black-gloved fist, wins 200m in Monaco

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Noah Lyles said he had plans going forward to make statements, beyond his rapid sprint times. He did that in Monaco on Friday.

Lyles raised a black, fingerless-gloved right fist before getting into the blocks to win a 200m in his first international race of the season, conjuring memories of the famous 1968 Olympic podium gesture.

He clocked 19.76 seconds, leading a one-two with younger brother Josephus. Full results are here.

“As athletes it’s hard to show that you love your country and also say that change is needed,” was posted on Lyles’ Instagram, along with hashtags including #blacklivesmatter. “This is my way of saying this country is great but it can be better.”

Lyles, the world 200m champion, also paid respect to 1968 Olympic 200m gold and bronze medalists Tommie Smith and John Carlos three hours before the race.

He tweeted an iconic image of Smith and Carlos raising their single black-gloved fists on the medal stand at the Mexico City Games. Thirteen minutes earlier, Lyles posted an Instagram Story image of his socks for the meet — plain, dark colored.

Smith and Carlos wore black socks without shoes on the podium to signify endemic poverty back in the U.S. at the time.

Lyles is known for his socks, often posting images of colorful pairs he wears before races, themes including Speed Racer, R2-D2 and Sonic the Hedgehog.

“We are at the point where you can’t do nothing anymore,” Lyles said Wednesday. “There aren’t any rules set out. You’re kind of just pushing the boundary as far as you can go. Some people have said, even if there were rules, they’re willing to go farther than that.”

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