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John-Henry Krueger, Olympic short track medalist, eyes Hungary

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John-Henry Krueger, who earned the U.S.’ lone short track medal in PyeongChang, wants to compete for Hungary.

U.S. Speedskating confirmed USA Today report that the Olympic 1000m silver medalist seeks Hungarian citizenship.

“I was and am still proud to have represented the United States during my career but have been faced with an unsustainable situation where if I continue pursuing my career with the US team I will bankrupt myself and my family,” Krueger said in an email, according to the newspaper. “Overall the financial costs necessary for me to perform competitively at the international level are unsustainable with the lack of sufficient financial support from US Speedskating and the [United States Olympic Committee].”

Krueger has not responded to a request for comment, but his representative said U.S. Speedskating is committed to grant Krueger’s request to be released to compete for Hungary.

“Today John-Henry accepted the Hungarian’s offer to represent Hungary,” was posted on Krueger’s mom’s Facebook account, according to the newspaper. “Be clear JH did not leave his country, but is leaving the federation that callously abandoned him on so many fronts long ago and then refused to thoughtfully consider any of JH’s concerns, opinions, and requirements.”

Krueger would join older brother Cole with the Hungarian program if released by U.S. Speedskating. Cole switched from the U.S. to Hungary after the 2015-16 season, but he had to take the 2016-17 season off from competition after being released by U.S. Speedskating.

The Kruegers had disputes with U.S. Speedskating since at least 2015, according to the Wall Street Journal. Cole moved to Hungary, which he said was the country of his ancestry, in part because of that program’s coaching staff.

“I don’t have problems with the U.S. coaches, but the skill level hasn’t been what I think was necessary,” Cole said, according to the newspaper in a March 2017 article. “No one would trade for the U.S. coaches.”

Cole was not chosen for Hungary’s Olympic team.

John-Henry, who lived and trained in South Korea and the Netherlands in recent years, swept all three distances at December’s U.S. Olympic Trials and was considered an outside medal hope going into his first Olympics.

His silver in the 1000m was the first individual U.S. Olympic medal in short- or long-track speed skating since 2010.

John-Henry joined about 200 members of the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic teams last Friday at the White House, where he was one of about a dozen athletes congratulated by name by President Donald Trump.

Krueger could become the fourth U.S. Winter Olympian to later compete for a different country at a Winter Games, after fellow short track skater Anthony Lobello, who competed for the U.S. in 2006 and Italy in 2014, Alpine skier Sarah Schleper, an American from 1998-2010 and Mexican in 2018 and Jazmine Fenlator-Victorian, a bobsledder for the U.S. in 2014 and Jamaica in 2018, according to the OlyMADMen.

Three other athletes competed for other countries at the Winter Olympics, then later became U.S. Winter Olympians (figure skater Rena Inoue and lugers Clay Ives and Bengt Walden).

NBC Olympic Research contributed to this report.

Correction: An earlier version of this post left out Schleper and Fenlator-Victorian as the second and third athletes to compete for the U.S. in a Winter Olympics, then a different nation in a later Olympics.

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MORE: Best short track moments from PyeongChang

2018 U.S. Gymnastics Championships results

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Results from the 2018 U.S. Gymnastics Championships in Boston …

Senior Women
All-around

  1. Simone Biles — 119.850
  2. Morgan Hurd — 113.300
  3. Riley McCusker — 112.750
  4. Grace McCallum — 111.650
  5. Shilese Jones — 109.850
  6. Jade Carey — 109.700
  7. Kara Eaker — 109.650
  8. Trinity Thomas — 109.600
  9. Alyona Shchennikova — 108.100
  10. Ragan Smith — 107.200
  11. Jordan Chiles — 106.850
  12. Shania Adams — 105.900
  13. Margzetta Frazier — 105.650
  14. Audrey Davis — 104.550
  15. Maddie Johnston — 102.250
  16. Sloane Blakely — 101.700
  17. Luisa Blanco — 101.000
  18. Olivia Dunne — 98.750

Vault

  1. Simone Biles — 31.125
  2. Shilese Jones — 29.050
  3. Grace McCallum — 29.000
  4. Morgan Hurd — 28.800
  5. Jordan Chiles — 28.750

Uneven bars

  1. Simone Biles — 29.400
  2. Riley McCusker — 29.300
  3. Morgan Hurd — 29.150
  4. Trinity Thomas — 27.900
  5. Alyona Shchennikova — 27.750

Balance beam

  1. Simone Biles — 30.100
  2. Kara Eaker — 28.650
  3. Riley McCusker — 28.500
  4. Morgan Hurd — 27.650
  5. Grace McCallum — 27.500

Floor exercise

  1. Simone Biles — 29.150
  2. Jade Carey — 28.300
  3. Morgan Hurd — 27.700
  4. Grace McCallum — 27.600
  5. Kara Eaker — 26.950

Senior Men
All-around

  1. Sam Mikulak — 172.900
  2. Yul Moldauer –168.150
  3. Allan Bower — 166.950
  4. Donothan Bailey — 166.800
  5. Alec Yoder — 166.550
  6. Akash Modi — 165.550
  7. Cameron Bock — 163.200
  8. Colin VanWicklen — 163.050
  9. Genki Suzuki — 162.800
  10. Kanji Oyama — 162.150
  11. Sean Melton — 161.300
  12. Robert Neff — 161.050
  13. Trevor Howard — 160.550
  14. Grant Breckenridge — 159.950
  15. Kiwan Watts — 159.500
  16. Tanner Justus — 158.650
  17. Anthony Stephenson — 158.300
  18. Alexei Vernyi — 157.800
  19. Shane Wiskus — 157.750
  20. Gage Dyer — 157.650
  21. Jacob Moore — 157.450
  22. Bennet Huang — 156.500
  23. Seth Delbridge — 153.500
  24. Jake Brodarzon — 150.600
  25. Kyte Crigger — 148.350
  26. Jalon Stephens — 109.850

Floor exercise

  1. Sam Mikulak — 29.100
  2. Yul Moldauer — 28.750
  3. Kanji Oyama — 28.650
  4. Allan Bower — 28.350
  5. Akash Modi — 28.300

Pommel horse

  1. Alec Yoder — 29.850
  2. Allan Bower — 29.200
  3. Ellis Mannon — 28.850
  4. Sam Mikulak — 28.600
  5. Donothan Bailey — 28.050

Still rings

  1. Trevor Howard — 29.200
  2. Alex Diab — 28.950
  3. Yul Moldauer — 28.650
  4. Sam Mikulak — 28.600
  5. Donnell Whittenburg — 28.550

Vault

  1. Anthony Stephenson — 29.550
  2. Yul Moldauer — 29.150
  3. Colin VanWicklen — 28.900
  4. Sean Melton — 28.700
  5. Donothan Bailey — 28.650

Parallel bars

  1. Sam Mikulak — 29.550
  2. Donothan Bailey — 28.350
  3. Yul Moldauer — 28.100
  4. Alec Yoder — 27.950
  5. Trevor Howard — 27.800

Horizontal bar

  1. Sam Mikulak — 28.400
  2. Donothan Bailey — 27.550
  3. Colin VanWicklen — 27.000
  4. Genki Suzuki — 26.950
  5. Akash Modi — 26.850

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GYM NATIONALS: Where Are The Final Five?

Sun Yang requests second national anthem after flags fall in Asian Games medal ceremony

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JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Sun Yang thought he’d seen it all in his glittering swimming career. That was until Sunday’s opening night of swimming finals at the Asian Games.

In an embarrassing technical blunder for games organizers, the flag hoist collapsed during the playing of the Chinese national anthem as Sun stood atop the podium after winning the 200m freestyle. Video is here.

Officials picked the flags up off the pool deck and hastily reattached them to the broken metal hoist but were unable to raise them again while the anthem was played for a second time, to the bemusement of Sun and spectators watching in the stands.

Diplomatically, Sun played down the incident when quizzed by reporters, saying he was just relieved to finally win the 200m free title which had eluded him in the two previous editions of the Asian Games.

Even though he is the reigning Olympic and world champion, Sun had never won the four-lap race at the Asian games, finishing runner-up to South Korea’s Park Tae-hwan in 2010 and second again to Japan’s Kosuke Hagino four years ago.

“I’ve waited eight years for this title,” Sun said. “It also gives me a golden grand slam of Olympic, world and Asian titles. It’s a perfect result, a dream. It’s unbelievable.”

Officials held the flags up in their hands for the subsequent medal ceremony before locating a replacement hoist for the remaining presentations. By the end of the night, China edged Japan 4-3 in the first seven finals decided.

Sun, who is trying to win the 200m, 400m, 800m and 1500m frees in Jakarta, cruised to victory in one minute 45.43 seconds.

He was outside his best, but with a busy program the 26-year-old did enough to win comfortably and celebrated in animated fashion, clenching his fists and punching the air in delight.

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MORE: Five thoughts off Pan Pacific Championships