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Jordan Burroughs keeps Rio defeat at a distance as he chases record

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NEW YORK — Jordan Burroughs says he has rewatched almost every one of his wrestling matches at least 15 times. That’s more than 150 senior matches in the last seven years, following a 148-match career at the University of Nebraska.

There is one event that he can’t bring himself to pull up in full — the Rio Olympics. Burroughs suffered two of his five career senior defeats in Brazil. Shockingly, tearfully, the London Olympic champ left his second Games without a medal.

“Disappointment, embarrassment, disgrace,” Burroughs told media on Aug. 19, 2016.

Nearly 700 days have passed. Burroughs has rebounded.

He wore his fourth world championships gold medal last August. He won the team World Cup title with the U.S. for the first time last month, the only senior tournament he had yet to claim.

Then last Thursday night, atop Pier 17 at South Street Seaport, Burroughs tacked on his first win over Cuban-born Italian Frank Chamizo at the annual Beat the Streets meet.

Chamizo took gold at the last two world championships before moving up to Burroughs’ 74kg division this year.

If Burroughs captures a fifth world title in October in Budapest, he will share the record he has for so long coveted — John Smith‘s six combined Olympic and world titles, most by an American.

He said none of what he has done since Rio, or what he can do the next two years, will make up for what happened in Brazil.

“It hurts me too much to look back at it, so I avoid it at all costs,” Burroughs said after a press conference at the New York Athletic Club overlooking Central Park last week. “Occasionally, I’ll come across an Instagram post where someone would do a highlight of the Olympics, and it will just be me getting my butt kicked, really. I’ll look at it. I’ll internalize it. I’ll think about it for the moment. I’ll let it sting. Then I’ll be driven from it.”

Burroughs distancing himself from defeat is not in character.

In 2014, he was beaten by his biggest rival, Russian Denis Tsargush, at the world championships. Burroughs saved on his phone an image of Tsargush celebrating on top of him as a constant reminder and said it motivated him to get out of bed on tired mornings.

Burroughs admitted last year’s world title was, at least somewhat, about proving to the world he could still be the best at age 29. The oldest men’s Olympic champion in freestyle between the last two Olympics was 26. Come Tokyo 2020, Burroughs will be older than any previous U.S. Olympic wrestling gold medalist.

Last year marked his most difficult path to gold since the match format was changed from best of three periods to a cumulative, two-period model in 2013. Burroughs gave up 17 points at worlds last August, more than twice as many as his 2013 and 2015 titles combined.

“I knew I was still the best wrestler in the world,” Burroughs said. “I knew I was the best wrestler in the world on August 19th, 2016. I just didn’t compete at my highest level. Whatever it was, whether it was the weight cut or mindset or lack of technical ability at that particular time, I felt like I was still the best wrestler. Things just didn’t come together for me.”

After worlds in Paris, Burroughs said he hoped the Tokyo Games would be his “final chapter.” Now he’s open to competing beyond 2020, but it won’t be his decision alone.

“Ask my wife,” Burroughs said. “I’ve got two little ones [son Beacon, 3, and daughter Ora, 1]. They’re still growing.

“I just want to win the gold in 2020. That’s the goal. My focus is 2018, 2019, 2020, re-evaluate after. … The only thing that can make up for [Rio] is win another gold in 2020.”

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Weekend Gymnastics Roundup: Carey and McCusker on World Cup podium

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World medalists Jade Carey and Riley McCusker headlined gymnastics action over the weekend as the World Cup circuit continued with an all-around competition in Birmingham, England, and an apparatus event in Doha, Qatar.

Carey won both the vault and floor events in Doha, pushing her to the top of the standings on both apparatus (she also won the vault and floor competitions the previous weekend at the World Cup in Baku, Azerbaijan).

Doha marked the halfway point of apparatus World Cups, putting Carey in a promising position to qualify for the Tokyo Games heading into the next four events. The apparatus World Cup series includes a total of eight competitions spread over two seasons, and one gymnast per apparatus will qualify for the Olympics based on his or her top three results across the eight events.

Carey, 18, was the 2017 world silver medalist on vault and floor. But she opted not to try for a spot on the 2018 World Championships team due to the International Gymnastics Federation’s rules that active team members who help their countries qualify team spots for Tokyo (as the U.S. women did in November) cannot earn individual spots. Carey, an apparatus specialist rather than an all-around gymnast, chose the World Cup route to keep open her options of qualifying individually.

McCusker, who was part of the U.S. team that won the world title last year, finished second at the all-around World Cup in Birmingham, posting the top scores on the uneven bars and floor. Russia’s Aliya Mustafina, a seven-time Olympic medalist, won the event. Mustafina bounced back from a shaky showing last weekend at the World Cup in Stuttgart, where she finished fifth in an event won by Simone Biles. Mustafina, 24, is trying to qualify for her third Olympics after giving birth to daughter Alisa in June 2017.

The all-around World Cup circuit continues on April 7 in Tokyo, Japan, where two-time world all-around medalist Morgan Hurd and two-time Olympian Sam Mikulak are expected to compete.

First Olympic women’s aerials champion Cheryazova dies at 50

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MOSCOW — Lina Cheryazova, the first woman to win an Olympic aerials skiing gold medal, has died. She was 50.

Officials in the Russian city of Novosibirsk, where Cheryazova was living for the last two decades, said she died “following a lengthy illness,” without giving further details.

Competing for Uzbekistan, Cheryazova won gold with a triple flip when aerials skiing debuted on the Olympic program in 1994 in Lillehammer.

Shortly after winning, she learned her mother died three weeks before.

Cheryazova’s career was derailed later that year when she suffered a serious head injury while training in the United States, and spent days in a coma. She retired after failing to qualify for the 1998 Winter Olympics.