Tearful Dawn Harper-Nelson reflects at last USATF Outdoor Champs

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Dawn Harper-Nelson knew for months that these USA Track and Field Outdoor Championships would be her last. All that time to prepare could not keep the tears from flowing.

The 2008 Olympic champion and 2012 silver medalist in the 100m hurdles bid farewell in an emotional interview after placing fifth in Des Moines on Saturday.

“I’m really just blessed by my career,” Harper-Nelson told Lewis Johnson on NBC. “Everything’s just kind of coming at me, like, ooh, I didn’t do as good as I wanted [in the final]. But then, I’ve had such an amazing career. I can’t be upset about what God has given me, the talent. Then the field in the U.S. is just sick. Hearing people call my name, it’s like, I made an impact. And that’s really what you want in the sport. I’m blessed to be here.”

Harper-Nelson announced in April that she would retire after this season. She competed at nationals for the 14th and last time (has four U.S. titles) and will end her career with races in Europe later this summer.

She broke through in 2008, taking Olympic gold despite being third at trials and making the Olympic team by .007 of a second. She clocked personal bests in both of her Olympic finals, taking second in 2012 behind Australian Sally Pearson.

Though Harper-Nelson missed the 2016 Olympic team in perhaps the deepest event in U.S. track and field, she bounced back to earn a surprise silver at the 2017 Worlds.

“Honestly, I’m ready for some babies,” said Harper-Nelson, who married Alonzo Nelson five years ago.

She joked that she would have to be dragged off the blue Drake Stadium track and said one regret would have been never holding the world record. But her medal record and reputation as a consistent, big-event competitor were unmatched in her U.S. hurdling generation.

“I want them to say [10 years down the line] that when Dawn went to the line, my money’s on her,” Harper-Nelson told media in Des Moines. “They just knew that I was a fierce competitor. … I got the job done.”

VIDEO: Men’s hurdles final decided by .002

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Eliud Kipchoge, two races shy of his target, to make Boston Marathon debut

Eliud Kipchoge Berlin Marathon
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World record holder Eliud Kipchoge will race the Boston Marathon for the first time on April 17.

Kipchoge, who at September’s Berlin Marathon lowered his world record by 30 seconds to 2:01:09, has won four of the six annual major marathons — Berlin, Tokyo, London and Chicago.

The 38-year-old Kenyan has never raced Boston, the world’s oldest annual marathon dating to 1897, nor New York City but has repeated in recent years a desire to enter both of them.

Typically, he has run the London Marathon in the spring and the Berlin Marathon in the fall.

Kipchoge’s last race in the U.S. was the 2014 Chicago Marathon, his second of 10 consecutive marathon victories from 2014 through 2019.

He can become the first reigning men’s marathon world record holder to finish the Boston Marathon since South Korean Suh Yun-Bok set a world record of 2:25:39 in Boston in 1947, according to the Boston Athletic Association.

In 2024 in Paris, Kipchoge is expected to race the Olympic marathon and bid to become the first person to win three gold medals in that event.

The Boston Marathon field also includes arguably the second- and third-best men in the world right now — Kipchoge’s Kenyan training partners Evans Chebet and Benson Kipruto. Chebet won Boston and New York City this year. Kipruto won Boston last year and Chicago this year.

American Des Linden, who won Boston in 2018, headlines the women’s field.

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2024 Tour de France to end with Nice time trial due to Paris Olympics

2024 Tour de France Nice
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The 2024 Tour de France will end on the French Riviera instead of the French capital because of the Paris Olympics.

The finish of cycling’s marquee race leaves Paris for the first time since 1905.

Tour organizers said on Thursday the last stage of its 111th race will take place in the Mediterranean resort of Nice on July 21. Five days later, Paris opens the Olympics.

Because of security and logistical reasons, the French capital won’t have its traditional Tour finish on the Champs-Elysees. Parting with tradition of a sprint on the Champs-Elysees, the last stage will be an individual time trial along Nice’s famed Promenade des Anglais.

The start of the 2024 race, which will begin for the first time in Italy, was brought forward by one week, a customary change during an Olympic year. The Tour will start on June 29 in Florence.

Nice has hosted the Tour 37 times, including its start twice, in 1981 and in 2020. Two years ago, the start was delayed until Aug. 29 due to lockdowns and travels bans during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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