AP

U.S. swim team qualifiers for 2019 World Championships

Leave a comment

U.S. pool qualifiers for the 2019 World Swimming Championships in Gwangju, South Korea in July. Swimmers qualified via best times from finals between 2018 Nationals and the Pan Pacific Championships, but the official roster has not been named yet … 

Women
Kathleen Baker — 100 back, 200 back, 200 IM
Mallory Comerford — 100 free
Kelsi Dahlia — 50 fly, 100 fly
Gabby DeLoof — 4×200 free
Katie Drabot — 200 fly
Hali Flickinger — 200 fly
Brooke Forde — 400 IM
Margo Geer — 4×100 free
Lilly King — 50 breast, 100 breast, 200 breast
Katie Ledecky — 200 free, 400 free, 800 free, 1500 free
Simone Manuel — 50 free, 100 free, 4×200 free
Melanie Margalis — 200 IM, 4×200 free
Ally McHugh — 400 IM
Katie McLaughlin — 100 fly
Katie Meili — 100 breast
Lia Neal — 4×100 free
Allison Schmitt — 200 free
Leah Smith — 400 free, 800 free, 4×200 free
Regan Smith — 200 back
Olivia Smoliga — 50 back, 100 back
Micah Sumrall — 200 breast
Ashley Twichell — 1500 free
Abbey Weitzeil — 50 free, 4×100 free

Men
Michael Andrew — 50 free, 50 breast, 100 breast, 50 fly
Nathan Adrian — 4×100 free
Zach Apple — 4×100 free, 4×200 free
Michael Chadwick — 4×100 free
Jack Conger — 100 fly
Abrahm Devine — 200 IM
Caeleb Dressel — 50 free, 100 free, 100 fly
Conor Dwyer — 4×200 free
Matt Grevers — 100 back
Zane Grothe — 400 free, 800 free, 1500 free
Townley Haas — 200 free
Zach Harting — 200 fly
Chase Kalisz — 200 IM, 400 IM
Jack Levant — 4×200 free
Jay Litherland — 400 IM
Ryan Murphy — 50 back, 100 back, 200 back
Jacob Pebley — 200 back
Blake Pieroni — 100 free, 4×200 free
Josh Prenot — 200 breast
Andrew Seliskar — 200 free
Grant Shoults — 400 free
Jordan Wilimovsky — 800 free, 1500 free
Andrew Wilson — 100 breast, 200 breast
Justin Wright — 200 fly

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Mental health on swimmers’ minds at nationals

Hirscher leads by 0.56 seconds after first run in World Champs slalom

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Marcel Hirscher swept into the finish area and wagged his finger triumphantly in front of the camera.

The message was clear: The ski king is back.

The Austrian produced an emphatic response to relinquishing his giant slalom title two days earlier at the world championships by taking a 0.56-second lead after the first run of the slalom on Sunday.

Only Alexis Pinturault of France was within a second of Hirscher, who was on course to win a record-tying seventh career gold medal at the worlds.

Marco Schwarz of Austria was in third place, 1.22 seconds off the lead.

Hirscher, the seven-time overall World Cup champion, showed no ill-effects from the cold that has been affecting him this week. After the giant slalom on Friday, he said he would be going straight back to bed to rest up for the slalom.

He looked in good working order on Sunday.

As the third skier on the course, Hirscher took 1.70 seconds off No. 2 starter Henrik Kristoffersen, who beat Hirscher to GS gold on Friday, and more than two seconds off Clement Noel, who came to the worlds in form after wins in Wengen and Kitzbuehel.

Save for Hirscher crashing, only Pinturault looks capable to denying the Austrian a third slalom gold at the worlds — something only the great Ingemar Stenmark has achieved. Pinturault was only 0.06 seconds behind Hirscher at the third checkpoint but he went wide at the first turn on the final descent and lost half a second.

“I’m still in the fight,” Pinturault said, “and still have a chance in the second leg. That’s the essential (thing).”

Daniel Yule of Switzerland was 0.28 behind Hirscher at the last split before falling at the start to the final descent.

Hirscher also won the slalom at the 2013 and 2017 worlds. A seventh career gold at the worlds would tie the men’s record held by compatriot Toni Sailer from the late 1950s.

Austria, a storied Alpine skiing nation, needs Hirscher to deliver in the final event to avoid finishing the world championships without a gold medal for the first time since Crans Montana, Switzerland, in 1987. The women’s team has already finished with no medals and that hasn’t happened since Schladming, Austria, in 1982.

Watch an encore presentation of the first run on NBCSN at 7:00 a.m. ET. The second and deciding run can be seen live starting at 8:00 a.m. ET on NBCSN and NBC Sports Gold.

Mikaela Shiffrin proving she’s in league of her own

Leave a comment

There are ski racers, and then there is Mikaela Shiffrin.

NBC Sports essayist Tim Layden calls Shiffrin the “rarest creature,” a prodigy who continues to get better with age.

Shiffrin’s stardom took off with her heart-stopping slalom gold medal in the 2014 Olympics. It looked like she would ascend to an even higher level four years later in PyeongChang when she claimed a gold medal in the giant slalom, but then she lost a battle with her nerves and failed to win a medal in the slalom. She did capture a silver in the combined event.

That Olympic disappointment has fueled her historic World Cup season. She became the youngest skier to pass the 50 win mark. She broke the women’s career record for slalom victories, and she became the first skier ever to win four-straight world championship titles in a single event.

A true prodigy indeed.