Serena Williams’ history of U.S. Open episodes with umpires, lineswoman

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NEW YORK (AP) — Serena Williamsdispute with the chair umpire during the 2018 U.S. Open final is the latest issue she’s had with match officials at the Grand Slam tournament.

Williams thought back to others while arguing in her 6-2, 6-4 loss to Naomi Osaka on Saturday, saying on court at one point: “This is not fair. This has happened to me too many times.”

When a reporter asked Williams whether her mind had flashed back to her infamous tirade over a foot fault in the final at Flushing Meadows nine years ago, she replied: “I think it’s just instantly, just like, ‘Oh, gosh, I don’t want to go back to 2004.’ Forget 2009, you know. It started way back then. So it’s always something.”

Here is a brief look back at those other U.S. Open episodes involving Williams, who has won six singles titles in New York:

THE WRONG CALL

Date: Sept. 7, 2004

Opponent: Jennifer Capriati

Round: Quarterfinals

Chair Umpire: Mariana Alves

Result: Capriati won 2-6, 6-4, 6-4

What happened: In the opening game of the third set, Williams hit a backhand that landed in — and was ruled in by a line judge — but Alves awarded the point to Capriati.

The fallout: This mistake was cited later when electronic line-calling was introduced to Grand Slam tennis.

What Williams said then: “I don’t need to see the replay. I know my shots. Not only was it in, it wasn’t even near the line. But I’m not making excuses. I didn’t lose because of that. I probably should have closed her out in the second set.”

THE FOOT FAULT

Opponent: Kim Clijsters

Round: Semifinals

Line judge: Shino Tsurubuchi

Result: Clijsters won 6-4, 7-5.

What happened: With Williams serving at 5-6, 15-30 in the second set, she faulted on her first serve. On the second serve, Tsurubuchi called a foot fault, making it a double-fault — a call rarely, if ever, seen at that stage of any match, let alone a major semifinal. That made the score 15-40, putting Clijsters one point from victory. Williams went over and shouted and cursed at Tsurubuchi, pointing at her. The line judge went over to chair umpire Louise Engzell, who assessed a penalty point, because it was Williams’ second code violation of the match (she broke her racket when the first set ended). That extra point for Clijsters ended the match.

The fallout: Williams was fined a record $82,500 and told she could be suspended from the U.S. Open and her fine doubled if she had another “major offense” at any Grand Slam tournament over the next two years.

What Williams said then: “I’ve never been in a fight in my whole life, so I don’t know why she would have felt threatened.”

THE HINDRANCE CALL

Date: Sept. 11, 2011

Opponent: Sam Stosur

Round: Final

Chair umpire: Eva Asderaki

Result: Stosur won 6-2, 6-3

What happened: Facing a break point at the start of the second set, Williams hit a forehand that she celebrated with a familiar cry of “Come on!” But she shouted as Stosur was still reaching for a backhand. Asderaki ruled the point wasn’t over and so awarded it to Stosur, saying Williams hindered her opponent’s ability to complete the exchange. Williams got broken in that game. She directed a series of insults at Asderaki, who issued a code violation for verbal abuse.

The fallout: Williams was fined $2,000 by the U.S. Open (she won $1.4 million at the tournament). But the Grand Slam committee ruled that what she did “did not rise to the level of a major offense” and so she didn’t face the additional disciplinary action that she could have been subject to after what happened in 2009.

What Williams said then: “You’re a hater, and you’re just unattractive inside,” to Asderaki.

MORE: Naomi Osaka’s popularity in Japan ahead of Tokyo Olympics

Asbel Kiprop, Olympic 1500m champ, banned four years

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Kenyan Asbel Kiprop, the 2008 Olympic 1500m champion and a three-time world champ, was banned four years after testing positive for EPO in November 2017, according to track and field’s doping watchdog organization.

The ban is backdated to Feb. 3, 2018, when the 29-year-old was provisionally suspended after the failed test.

Kiprop repeatedly denied doping since last May, when he first acknowledged the positive test. Most recently, a 3,000-word defense from his lawyer was posted on Kiprop’s Facebook page.

Kiprop’s defenses included saying he was a victim of extortion and that he was offered “a reward” of becoming an anti-doping ambassador if he admitted guilt. The Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU), the IAAF’s independent organization to monitor doping and corruption, denied the latter last May.

A disciplinary panel dismissed six defenses from exonerating him, including the possibility his sample was spiked, in handing out the four-year ban.

Kiprop, the pre-eminent 1500m runner of the last decade, can appeal the ban.

At 19, he finished second in the Beijing Olympic 1500m but was upgraded to gold a year later after Bahrain’s Rashid Ramzi failed a drug test. He is the youngest Olympic 1500m medalist of all time, according to the OlyMADMen.

Kiprop went on to earn three straight world titles in the 1500m in 2011, 2013 and 2015, matching the feats of retired legends Noureddine Morceli and Hicham El Guerrouj.

He struggled in the 2012 and 2016 Olympics, finishing last in the London final with a hamstring injury and sixth in the Rio final won by American rival Matthew Centrowitz.

Kiprop has targeted El Guerrouj’s world record of 3:26:00, missing the mark by .69 of a second in 2015.

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Maggie Nichols is second woman in 20 years to repeat as NCAA all-around champ

Maggie Nichols
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Oklahoma junior and world champion gymnast Maggie Nichols became the first woman to repeat as NCAA all-around champion in 12 years, returning from a heel injury to compete on all four events for the first time since January on Friday.

Nichols, a Rio Olympic hopeful before being beset by a torn meniscus in 2016, joined 2004 Olympic silver medalist Courtney Kupets as the only women to win back-to-back NCAA all-arounds in the 2000s.

A junior, Nichols can next year join Jenny Hansen as the only women to three-peat in NCAA history.

Oklahoma goes for a third team title in four years on Saturday night against UCLA (featuring Olympic champions Madison Kocian and Kyla Ross), LSU and Denver.

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NCAA Women’s Gymnastics Championships Individual Results
All-Around
1. Maggie Nichols (Oklahoma) — 39.7125
2. Lexy Ramler (Minnesota) — 39.6625
2. Kyla Ross (UCLA) — 39.6625
4. Sarah Finnegan (LSU) — 39.65
5. Kennedi Edney (LSU) — 39.6

Vault
1. Kennedi Edney (LSU) — 9.95
1. Derrian Gobourne (Auburn)
1. Maggie Nichols (Oklahoma)
1. Kyla Ross (UCLA)

Uneven Bars
1. Sarah Finnegan (LSU) — 9.95

Balance Beam
1. Natalie Wojcik (Michigan) — 9.95

Floor Exercise
1. Alicia Boren (Florida) — 9.95
1. Lynnzee Brown (Denver)
1. Brenna Dowell (Oklahoma)
1. Kyla Ross (UCLA)