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How to watch 2018 Chicago Marathon live on TV, streaming

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The 41st Chicago Marathon airs live on Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA and streams on NBC Sports Gold for subscribers on Sunday at 8 a.m. ET.

Two-time U.S. Olympic medalist Galen Rupp defends his title against four-time Olympic track champion Mo Farah of Great Britain, plus Kenyan Geoffrey Kirui, the 2017 World champion who beat Rupp at the 2017 Boston Marathon.

While top U.S. female marathoners Amy Cragg and Jordan Hasay withdrew before Sunday’s race, it still includes perhaps the most intriguing distance runner, Gwen Jorgensen. Jorgensen switched to the marathon after becoming the first U.S. Olympic triathlon champion in Rio (and becoming a mom in 2017).

The most decorated marathoner racing Sunday is Tatyana McFadden, a 17-time Paralympic medalist who swept the Boston, Chicago, London and New York City Marathon wheelchair titles in 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016.

WATCH LIVE: Chicago Marathon: 8 a.m. ET
OLYMPIC CHANNEL STREAM HERE
NBC SPORTS GOLD STREAM HERE

Rupp, 32, last year became the first U.S. male runner to win Chicago since Khalid Khannouchi in 2002. After Rupp ran a personal-best marathon in Prague last time out, he now says Khannouchi’s American record in the marathon is in play on Sunday.

A major reason why is that Rupp expects to be pushed by a strong field.

Farah, a 35-year-old who dominated track distance races with 10 Olympic/world titles between 2011 and 2017, finished third in the London Marathon on April 22 in his first 26.2-miler since switching full-time to road racing.

Kirui is arguably the world’s best marathoner aside from Kenyan world-record holder Eliud Kipchoge. In addition to his 2017 Boston and world titles, he finished second in Boston this year as the only elite East African runner to place in the top eight of either the men or women in hypothermia-inducing weather.

The Chicago women’s field is not as strong after the world bronze medalist Cragg and Hasay, the second-fastest U.S. female marathoner in history, dropped out due to health setbacks.

Kenyans Brigid Kosgei (2017 Chicago and 2018 London runner-up) and Florence Kiplagat (2015 and 2016 Chicago winner) and Ethiopians Roza Dereje (2018 Dubai winner in 2:19:17) and Birhane Dibaba (2018 Tokyo winner in 2:19:51) are the favorites.

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VIDEO: Tatyana McFadden stars in Nike ad before Chicago Marathon

Robbie Hummel, in third basketball career, leads U.S. to 3×3 world title

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When Robbie Hummel played for the Minnesota Timberwolves, he was a locker neighbor of Kevin Love. Hummel’s NBA career was brief, shortened by knee and hand injuries, but he remembered one conversation in particular now that he’s hopeful to play Olympic basketball next year.

Love, after coming back from earning gold with the U.S. at the 2012 London Games, shared with Hummel the experience of being an Olympian. The kaleidoscope that is the Olympic Village. And, namely, watching Usain Bolt sprint.

“The buildup to it is like a prize fight,” Hummel recalled Love saying. “Then it’s over in a blink of an eye.”

Hummel, whose Purdue career included two honorable mention All-Americas and two ACL tears, sandwiched that two-season NBA stint with stops in Spanish, Italian and Russian leagues. By 2017, when he was 28, he had enough.

“The sad reality of this is, I’ve just had a tough time staying healthy since my sophomore year of college,” Hummel tweeted on Oct. 3, 2017, announcing he accepted analyst jobs with ESPN and the Big Ten Network. “Last season was difficult for me living abroad. It got to the point where there were many nights I wondered if I was cheating a game I love by not being 100 percent all in. That’s never been me with this game, and because of that, a change has become something I feel is necessary. … It’s been a hell of a ride, and I look forward to continuing that watching a sport I’ve loved since I was a kid.”

Six months later, Hummel traveled to San Antonio to call the first 3×3 university national championship, held in conjunction with the Final Four. He had never played 3×3. The rules vary from the traditional game, as he would come to know. In 3×3, half-court games end after 10 minutes or once a team scores 21.

“I was underqualified,” Hummel said.

But cognizant. Also in San Antonio were some of the premier, professional U.S. 3×3 players bidding for the event’s Olympic debut in Tokyo in 2020. Most suited up in college but never the NBA.

That included Craig Moore, who played against Hummel as a four-year starter at Northwestern. Moore continued tracking his former Big Ten foe while Hummel played overseas in 2015 and 2016, texting him congrats if he saw an impressive stat line on the web.

When Hummel replied in 2017 to say he was finished, Moore tried to talk to him out of it.

“If it wasn’t in the NBA, I wasn’t going to play anymore,” Hummel said.

Moore’s response: Play with us.

Moore has become the on-court leader of Team Princeton 3×3, a program that dates to the early 1990s, an investment firm CEO who once beat Michael Jordan in one-on-one, Michelle Obama‘s brother and the tenets of the retired, 29-year Princeton coach Pete Carril‘s motion-predicated offense.

Last year, that CEO/team GM John Rogers asked Moore to suggest an extra player since Princeton would field two separate teams at the national championship. Versatility is another key in 3×3. Hummel suits it well, at 6-foot-8 and potent from beyond the arc.

“He seemed to have a bitter end to his career, not enjoying living and playing in Europe,” Moore said. “I asked him, ‘Is that how you want to remember playing basketball? Give 3×3 a chance. Maybe you’ll fall in love with the game.'”

Hummel took him up. He joined Princeton for a FIBA tournament in South Korea, where the Americans lost in the semifinals to a team from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The following week, Hummel played for one of the two Princeton teams at nationals in Colorado Springs and again reached the semis.

The travel wasn’t so bad. Hummel could still live in Chicago. The bulk of the 3×3 season would end before the start of the NCAA season, so he could still do TV work.

“Any basketball player that retires from playing pro, the one thing you always hear guys say is there’s no way to replicate the feeling of playing in a big-time atmosphere,” he said. “Maybe this is different from playing Michigan State on CBS, or an NBA game. It’s not going to be that, but it’s the next best thing.

“Somebody told me there’s a reason you see musicians playing until they’re 70. This has kind of been that void that has been filled.”

Hummel returned to TV work last fall and winter, doing about 40 appearances for ESPN and almost as many games plus studio shows for the Big Ten Network.

Then this spring, he was back at 3×3 nationals, this time after a full year learning the game. His Princeton team beat Moore’s squad for the title in May. Hummel was tournament MVP, scoring 16 of his team’s 21 points in the final.

Then last week, Hummel was again MVP, leading the U.S. to its first FIBA World Cup title, the equivalent of a world championship. It was the sixth edition of the event. The previous five were won by Serbia (four times) and Qatar. Past U.S. teams (again, no NBA stars) had lost to Romania, Poland and Tunisia.

“I had kind of given up on basketball,” Hummel said in an on-court interview interrupted by teammates pouring water from bottles over his head in Amsterdam. “I’m fortunate that these guys let me be a part of their pro team.

“You learn that every day is a gift, and whenever you can play, you need to take advantage of it, because stuff like this can happen, and when it does, it’s pretty cool.”

The U.S. can’t qualify for the Olympics until this fall at the earliest. If it does, a USA Basketball committee will choose the four players to form the Olympic team next summer. Hummel has to be considered a favorite. He feels healthy for somebody who had two major knee surgeries in college and a shoulder operation as a pro.

“When Craig and those guys were pitching this to me, I thought that would be a really cool way to end my playing career,” Hummel said of the Games. “I’m not sure if I would have gotten into it without the Olympic incentive, but having now played, if I was told tomorrow I was not going to the Olympics, I would still make the trips.”

MORE: How U.S. Olympic 3×3 teams will be chosen

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Dutchman who beat cancer to win Olympic gold completes 121-mile charity swim

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THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — Olympic open-water swimming champion Maarten van der Weijden completed a marathon swim along the route of a famous Dutch speed skating race to raise money for cancer research.

Van der Weijden completed the 121-mile swim through canals in the northern province of Friesland in just over three days when he swam slowly into the city of Leeuwarden Monday evening followed by a flotilla of boats and stand-up paddlers.

Van der Weijden has been a Dutch celebrity since winning the open-water 10km at the 2008 Beijing Olympics after surviving leukemia, and has used his fame to raise millions for cancer research.

He completed the swim less than a year after having to give up his first attempt after 101 miles due to ill health.

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