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2018 World Gymnastics Championships results

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Full results from the 2018 World Gymnastics Championships in Doha, Qatar …

Men’s Team Final
Gold: China — 256.634
Silver: Russia — 256.585
Bronze: Japan — 253.744
4. USA — 251.994
5. Great Britain — 248.628
6. Switzerland — 244.294
7. Brazil — 243.994
8. Netherlands — 240.660

Women’s Team Final
Gold: USA — 171.629
Silver: Russia — 162.863
Bronze: China — 162.396
4. Canada — 161.644
5. France — 161.294
6. Japan — 160.262
7. Brazil — 159.830
8. Germany — 159.428

Men’s All-Around (Wednesday)
Gold: Artur Dalaloyan (RUS) — 87.598
Silver: Xiao Ruoteng (CHN) — 87.598
Bronze: Nikita Nagornyy (RUS) — 86.331
4. Sun Wei (CHN) — 85.898
5. Sam Mikulak (USA) — 85.273
6. Kazuma Kaya (JPN) — 84.765
7. Kenzo Shirai (JPN) — 84.531
8. James Hall (GBR) — 84.298
12. Yul Moldauer (USA) — 81.932

Women’s All-Around
Gold: Simone Biles (USA) — 57.941
Silver: Mai Murakami (JPN) — 55.798
Bronze: Morgan Hurd (USA) — 55.732
4. Nina Derwael (BEL) — 55.699
5. Angelina Melnikova (RUS) — 55.698
6. Melanie de Jesus dos Santos — 55.599
7. Chen Yile (CHN) — 54.632
8. Flavia Saraiva (BRA) — 54.366

Men’s Floor Exercise
Gold: Artur Dalaloyan (RUS) — 14.9
Silver: Kenzo Shirai (JPN) — 14.866

Bronze: Carlos Yulo (PHI) — 14.6
4. Yul Moldauer (USA) — 14.566
5. Artem Dolgopyat (ISR) — 14.566
6. Nikita Nagornyy (RUS) — 14.5
7. Sam Mikulak (USA) — 14.233
8. Kazuma Kaya (JPN) — 14.1
9. Ahmet Onder (TUR) — 13.833

Women’s Vault
Gold: Simone Biles (USA) — 15.366
Silver: Shallon Olsen (CAN) — 14.516
Bronze: Alexa Moreno (MEX) — 14.508
4. Oksana Chusovitina (UZB) — 14.3
5. Yeo Seojeong (KOR) — 14.233
6. Liu Jinru (CHN) — 14.15
7. Ellie Black (CAN) — 14.116
8. Pyon Rye Yong (PRK) — 13.616

Men’s Pommel Horse
Gold: Xiao Ruoteng (CHN) — 15.166
Silver: Max Whitlock (GBR) — 15.166
Bronze: Lee Chih Kai (TPE) — 14.966
4. Sam Mikulak (USA) — 14.333
5. Nariman Kurbanov (KAZ) — 13.4
6. Nikita Nagornyy (RUS) — 12.533
7. David Belyavskiy (RUS) — 11.833
8. Cyril Tommasone (FRA) — 11.5

Women’s Uneven Bars
Gold: Nina Derwael (BEL) — 15.2
Silver: Simone Biles (USA) — 14.7
Bronze: Elisabeth Seitz (GER) — 14.6
4. Luo Huan (CHN) — 14.5
5. Aliya Mustafina (RUS) — 14.433
6. Morgan Hurd (USA) — 14.433
7. Becky Downie (GBR) — 13.333
8. Jonna Adlerteg (SWE) — 13.166

Men’s Still Rings
Gold: Eleftherios Petrounias (GRE) — 15.366
Silver: Arthur Zanetti (BRA) – 15.1
Bronze: Marco Lodadio (ITA) — 14.9
4. Artur Tovmasyan (ARM) — 14.766
5. Nikita Nagornyy (RUS) — 14.733
6. Vahagn Davtyan (ARM) — 14.733
7. Nikita Simonov (AZE) — 14.266
8. Igor Radivilov (UKR) — 14.133

Men’s Vault
Gold: Ri Se Gwang (PRK) — 14.933
Silver: Artur Dalaloyan (RUS) — 14.883
Bronze: Kenzo Shirai (JPN) — 14.675
4. Dominick Cunningham (GBR) — 14.666
5. Nikita Nagornyy (RUS) — 14.65
6. Shek Wai Hung (HKG) — 14.366
7. Artur Davtyan (ARM) — 13.933
8. Caio Souza (BRA) — 13.883

Women’s Balance Beam
Gold: Liu Tingting (CHN) — 14.533
Silver: Anne-Marie Padurariu (CAN) — 14.1
Bronze: Simone Biles (USA) — 13.6
4. Nina Derwael (BEL) — 13.466
5. Ellie Black (CAN) — 13.033
6. Kara Eaker (USA) — 12.833
7. Sanne Wevers (NED) — 12.666
8. Zhang Jin (CHN) — 11.5

Men’s Parallel Bars
Gold: Zou Jingyuan (CHN) — 16.433
Silver: Oleg Verniaiev (UKR) — 15.591
Bronze: Artur Dalaloyan (RUS) — 15.366

4. Sam Mikulak (USA) — 15.233
5. Lin Chaopan (CHN) — 15.2
6. Jossimar Calvo (COL) — 15.033
7. David Belyavskiy (RUS) — 14.633
8. Lukas Dauser (GER) — 13.7

Women’s Floor Exercise
Gold: Simone Biles (USA) — 14.933
Silver: Morgan Hurd (USA) — 13.933
Bronze: Mai Murakami (JPN) — 13.866
4. Angelina Melnikova (RUS) — 13.833
5. Flavia Saraiva (BRA) — 13.766
6. Melanie de Jesus dos Santos (FRA) — 13.433
7. Liliya Akhaimova (RUS) — 13.366
8. Brooklyn Moors (CAN) — 13.066

Men’s High Bar
Gold: Epke Zonderland (NED) — 15.1
Silver: Kohei Uchimura (JPN) — 14.8
Bronze: Sam Mikulak (USA) — 14.533
4. Tin Srbic (CRO) — 14.5
5. Tang Chia-Hung (TPE) — 14.266
6. Deng Shudi (CHN) — 14.066
7. Xiao Ruoteng (CHN) — 13.9
8. Artur Dalaloyan (RUS) — 12.666

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2022 Pan Pacific Championships canceled as swimming calendar shifts

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The Pan Pacific Swimming Championships, a quadrennial major international meet, will not be held in 2022 “out of respect for the recent changes to the international sporting calendar,” according to a press release.

The Pan Pacs’ charter nations — the U.S., Australia, Canada and Japan — agreed to the move. The 2026 event will be held in Canada, which was supposed to be the 2022 host.

The decision came after the 2021 World Championships were moved to May 2022, following the Tokyo Olympics moving from 2020 to 2021 due to the coronavirus pandemic. The quadrennial multi-sport Commonwealth Games — which includes Australia and Canada, but not the U.S. or Japan — are scheduled for July 27-Aug. 7, 2022.

“Organizing a third major championships in that window presented several challenges,” according to the Pan Pacs release.

Pan Pacs mark the third-biggest major international meet for U.S. swimmers, held in non-Olympic, non-world championships years.

MORE: Caeleb Dressel co-hosts a podcast. It’s not about swimming.

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Boston Marathon canceled for first time after 123 years; virtual event planned

Boston Marathon
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The Boston Marathon, held every year since 1897, has been canceled as an in-person event for the first time. It will be held as a virtual race instead due to the coronavirus.

“While we cannot bring the world to Boston in September, we plan to bring Boston to the world for an historic 124th Boston Marathon,” Boston Athletic Association (BAA) CEO Tom Grilk said in a press release.

The world’s oldest annual marathon had been postponed from April 20 to Sept. 14, it was announced March 13.

Boston Mayor Marty Walsh said he first considered canceling the postponed marathon during a coronavirus surge in April.

“We were maxed out in our hospital emergency rooms,” Walsh said Thursday. “I realized that the downside of the curve, which we were on, the backside of the curve, is going to be going for some time. The concern of a second surge made me have some real reservations about can we have the marathon or not.”

Walsh said experts said a potential second surge would be between August and October. He held out hope to hold the race until talking with the BAA last week.

All participants originally registered for Boston will be offered a full refund of their entry fee and have the opportunity to participate in the virtual alternative, which can be run between Sept. 7-14.

More details, including entry information, will be announced in the coming weeks.

It’s the biggest alteration to the Boston Marathon, which was inspired by the marathon’s debut at the first modern Olympics in 1896. Previously, the biggest change came in 1918, the last year of World War I. The marathon was still held on Patriots’ Day in April but as a 10-man military relay race.

The original 2020 Boston elite fields included two-time U.S. Olympian Des Linden, the 2018 Boston winner who was fourth at the Feb. 29 Olympic Trials, where the top three earned Olympic spots.

London is the world’s other major spring marathon. It was rescheduled from April 27 to Oct. 4. Its original fields for April were headlined by the two fastest men in history — Kenyan Eliud Kipchoge and Ethiopian Kenenisa Bekele. It’s unknown if they will remain in the field, should London happen.

The fall major marathon schedule

Boston — Sept. 7-14 (virtual event)
Berlin — TBD (will not be held as planned on Sept. 27)
London — Oct. 4
Chicago — Oct. 11
New York City — Nov. 1

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MORE: U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials results