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2018 World Gymnastics Championships results

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Full results from the 2018 World Gymnastics Championships in Doha, Qatar …

Men’s Team Final
Gold: China — 256.634
Silver: Russia — 256.585
Bronze: Japan — 253.744
4. USA — 251.994
5. Great Britain — 248.628
6. Switzerland — 244.294
7. Brazil — 243.994
8. Netherlands — 240.660

Women’s Team Final
Gold: USA — 171.629
Silver: Russia — 162.863
Bronze: China — 162.396
4. Canada — 161.644
5. France — 161.294
6. Japan — 160.262
7. Brazil — 159.830
8. Germany — 159.428

Men’s All-Around (Wednesday)
Gold: Artur Dalaloyan (RUS) — 87.598
Silver: Xiao Ruoteng (CHN) — 87.598
Bronze: Nikita Nagornyy (RUS) — 86.331
4. Sun Wei (CHN) — 85.898
5. Sam Mikulak (USA) — 85.273
6. Kazuma Kaya (JPN) — 84.765
7. Kenzo Shirai (JPN) — 84.531
8. James Hall (GBR) — 84.298
12. Yul Moldauer (USA) — 81.932

Women’s All-Around
Gold: Simone Biles (USA) — 57.941
Silver: Mai Murakami (JPN) — 55.798
Bronze: Morgan Hurd (USA) — 55.732
4. Nina Derwael (BEL) — 55.699
5. Angelina Melnikova (RUS) — 55.698
6. Melanie de Jesus dos Santos — 55.599
7. Chen Yile (CHN) — 54.632
8. Flavia Saraiva (BRA) — 54.366

Men’s Floor Exercise
Gold: Artur Dalaloyan (RUS) — 14.9
Silver: Kenzo Shirai (JPN) — 14.866

Bronze: Carlos Yulo (PHI) — 14.6
4. Yul Moldauer (USA) — 14.566
5. Artem Dolgopyat (ISR) — 14.566
6. Nikita Nagornyy (RUS) — 14.5
7. Sam Mikulak (USA) — 14.233
8. Kazuma Kaya (JPN) — 14.1
9. Ahmet Onder (TUR) — 13.833

Women’s Vault
Gold: Simone Biles (USA) — 15.366
Silver: Shallon Olsen (CAN) — 14.516
Bronze: Alexa Moreno (MEX) — 14.508
4. Oksana Chusovitina (UZB) — 14.3
5. Yeo Seojeong (KOR) — 14.233
6. Liu Jinru (CHN) — 14.15
7. Ellie Black (CAN) — 14.116
8. Pyon Rye Yong (PRK) — 13.616

Men’s Pommel Horse
Gold: Xiao Ruoteng (CHN) — 15.166
Silver: Max Whitlock (GBR) — 15.166
Bronze: Lee Chih Kai (TPE) — 14.966
4. Sam Mikulak (USA) — 14.333
5. Nariman Kurbanov (KAZ) — 13.4
6. Nikita Nagornyy (RUS) — 12.533
7. David Belyavskiy (RUS) — 11.833
8. Cyril Tommasone (FRA) — 11.5

Women’s Uneven Bars
Gold: Nina Derwael (BEL) — 15.2
Silver: Simone Biles (USA) — 14.7
Bronze: Elisabeth Seitz (GER) — 14.6
4. Luo Huan (CHN) — 14.5
5. Aliya Mustafina (RUS) — 14.433
6. Morgan Hurd (USA) — 14.433
7. Becky Downie (GBR) — 13.333
8. Jonna Adlerteg (SWE) — 13.166

Men’s Still Rings
Gold: Eleftherios Petrounias (GRE) — 15.366
Silver: Arthur Zanetti (BRA) – 15.1
Bronze: Marco Lodadio (ITA) — 14.9
4. Artur Tovmasyan (ARM) — 14.766
5. Nikita Nagornyy (RUS) — 14.733
6. Vahagn Davtyan (ARM) — 14.733
7. Nikita Simonov (AZE) — 14.266
8. Igor Radivilov (UKR) — 14.133

Men’s Vault
Gold: Ri Se Gwang (PRK) — 14.933
Silver: Artur Dalaloyan (RUS) — 14.883
Bronze: Kenzo Shirai (JPN) — 14.675
4. Dominick Cunningham (GBR) — 14.666
5. Nikita Nagornyy (RUS) — 14.65
6. Shek Wai Hung (HKG) — 14.366
7. Artur Davtyan (ARM) — 13.933
8. Caio Souza (BRA) — 13.883

Women’s Balance Beam
Gold: Liu Tingting (CHN) — 14.533
Silver: Anne-Marie Padurariu (CAN) — 14.1
Bronze: Simone Biles (USA) — 13.6
4. Nina Derwael (BEL) — 13.466
5. Ellie Black (CAN) — 13.033
6. Kara Eaker (USA) — 12.833
7. Sanne Wevers (NED) — 12.666
8. Zhang Jin (CHN) — 11.5

Men’s Parallel Bars
Gold: Zou Jingyuan (CHN) — 16.433
Silver: Oleg Verniaiev (UKR) — 15.591
Bronze: Artur Dalaloyan (RUS) — 15.366

4. Sam Mikulak (USA) — 15.233
5. Lin Chaopan (CHN) — 15.2
6. Jossimar Calvo (COL) — 15.033
7. David Belyavskiy (RUS) — 14.633
8. Lukas Dauser (GER) — 13.7

Women’s Floor Exercise
Gold: Simone Biles (USA) — 14.933
Silver: Morgan Hurd (USA) — 13.933
Bronze: Mai Murakami (JPN) — 13.866
4. Angelina Melnikova (RUS) — 13.833
5. Flavia Saraiva (BRA) — 13.766
6. Melanie de Jesus dos Santos (FRA) — 13.433
7. Liliya Akhaimova (RUS) — 13.366
8. Brooklyn Moors (CAN) — 13.066

Men’s High Bar
Gold: Epke Zonderland (NED) — 15.1
Silver: Kohei Uchimura (JPN) — 14.8
Bronze: Sam Mikulak (USA) — 14.533
4. Tin Srbic (CRO) — 14.5
5. Tang Chia-Hung (TPE) — 14.266
6. Deng Shudi (CHN) — 14.066
7. Xiao Ruoteng (CHN) — 13.9
8. Artur Dalaloyan (RUS) — 12.666

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Richard Callaghan, figure skating coach, banned for life

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Richard Callaghan, a figure skating coach best known for helping Tara Lipinski earn 1998 Olympic gold, was ruled permanently ineligible for violations including sexual misconduct involving a minor.

Callaghan can still appeal the sexual misconduct violation, according to the U.S. Center for SafeSport, a watchdog for U.S. Olympic sports organizations that updated Callaghan’s status Wednesday.

He was first suspended in March 2018 pending an investigation into allegations first made against him more than 20 years ago.

Earlier this month, another former skater, Adam Schmidt, said in a lawsuit that he was sexually molested as a teenager by Callaghan starting in 1999.

Callaghan was previously accused of sexual misconduct in April 1999 by Craig Maurizi, one of his former students and later an assistant to him in San Diego and Detroit.

Maurizi told The New York Times that Callaghan had engaged in inappropriate sexual contact with him beginning when he was 15 years old. The alleged misconduct had begun nearly 20 years earlier. Callaghan denied the allegations.

In March 2018, Callaghan told ABC News: “That’s 19 or 20 years ago. I have nothing to say.”

Maurizi’s previous grievance against Callaghan with the U.S. Figure Skating Association, the precursor to U.S. Figure Skating, was dismissed on procedural grounds.

He was Callaghan’s assistant at the Detroit Skating Club until they split after Lipinski turned pro, left Callaghan and decided to train with Maurizi.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Pita Taufatofua, Tonga flag bearer, finishes last in kayak debut

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Pita Taufatofua, the Tonga Olympic flag bearer who went viral in Rio and PyeongChang, began his quest to make a third straight Olympics in a third different sport with a last-place finish in his opening-round heat at the world sprint kayak championships in Hungary on Wednesday.

The start of the heat appeared delayed as Taufatofua struggled to get his kayak into position in the water. He was left at the start as the other six kayakers raced out and finished between 33 and 40 seconds. Taufatofua took 58.19 seconds, the slowest of 53 finishers among seven total heats.

“Well that was slightly better than the first time I competed in Taekwondo or skiing,” was tweeted from Taufatofua’s account. “Would have liked to start facing the right way but that’s life.”

Taufatofua, 35, was the oldest athlete in the heat by nearly a decade. He is also entered in doubles races with Tonga canoe federation president Malakai Ahokava with heats Thursday and Friday.

Taufatofua hopes to compete at the Tokyo Olympics in taekwondo, where he competed in Rio, and in sprint kayak.

But he hasn’t competed in taekwondo in three years and just started training kayak this spring. At worlds, Taufatofua told the BBC he is still having trouble staying afloat in the water.

Taufatofua said in announcing the new sport in April that it would be “largely impossible” to qualify for Tokyo. He could be the first athlete to compete in a different sport in three straight Olympics (Summer and Winter) since the Winter Games began in 1924, according to the OlyMADMen.

“It’s certainly going to be the greatest challenge that I’ve ever had to embark on,” he said then.

Taufatofua’s results at worlds this week has little bearing on his Olympic qualifying prospects. Rather, he just needed to compete in Hungary to stay eligible for the Olympics.

The key will be an Oceania qualifying event early next year, where one Olympic bid is available. He will likely have to beat the best kayakers from Australia and New Zealand to grab it. Australian Stephen Bird placed eighth at the Rio Olympics and 11th at the 2018 World Championships.

If Taufatofua fails, he could receive a special tripartite invitation sometimes offered to smaller nations like Tonga.

Taufatofua became a social-media celebrity by marching into the Rio Olympic Opening Ceremony shirtless and oiled up. He then lost in the first round via mercy rule in his taekwondo tournament.

He made a quixotic bid for the PyeongChang Winter Games in cross-country skiing — and accomplished the feat, barely, in a sport that has lenient qualifying requirements for nations with a lack of Winter Games depth.

Taufatofua finished 114th out of 116 in his 15km Olympic cross-country skiing race, nearly 23 minutes behind the winner.

If Taufatofua is able to carry the Tongan flag at a third Opening Ceremony, he will definitely be shirtless again, in a similar outfit to what he wore in Rio and PyeongChang, he said last year.

MORE: Five-time Olympic kayak medalist banned four years

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