Geoffrey Kamworor eyes New York City Marathon repeat, Eliud Kipchoge

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NEW YORK — When Kenyan Geoffrey Kamworor finished last year’s New York City Marathon, Eliud Kipchoge was already there waiting for him. One day, Kamworor would like to reverse those roles.

“You believe that maybe one time you run against him, you’d like to beat him,” Kamworor said Thursday, three days before he defends his title in New York.

Kamworor is arguably the world’s second-best marathoner behind training partner Kipchoge, the world-record holder whom Kamworor calls a mentor.

They’ve gone head-to-head once, at the 2013 Berlin Marathon, before either had reached their 26.2-mile peak. Kipchoge placed second, his only defeat in 11 marathons, and Kamworor was third, another 2:21 behind.

Kipchoge’s appearance in New York last year was purely as a spectator, delighted to see Kamworor’s breakthrough. Kamworor does not expect him to return to watch this year’s race.

While Kipchoge is in a class of his own, Kamworor is among those jockeying in the amoeba-like second tier. Chicago Marathon winner and four-time Olympic track champion Mo Farah is there, too. Ethiopian Shura Kitata, 22, can boost his argument by challenging Kamworor on Sunday.

Kamworor, who chose a running career over studying law at a U.S. college, notched his first major marathon win in New York last November. It fulfilled years of promise.

At 18 years old, he helped pace Patrick Makau to a world record in Berlin in 2011. A year later, he debuted in the marathon and then had a biopic titled, “The Unknown Runner.” Kamworor has won the last three world titles in the half marathon.

“I don’t think I’ve trained the most talented athletes, but I’ve trained athletes with talent who are hard-working people and who want to maximize their full potential, like Eliud and Geoffrey,” Patrick Sang, who coaches the training group with Kipchoge and Kamworor, said in 2016, according to the IAAF. “I don’t think they are the greatest talents, but they are the people who are willing to give the most out of their potential.”

One thing working against Kamworor is his personal best — 2:06:12 from his debut in Berlin in 2012. That ranks outside the top 100 in the world all-time and is 4:33 slower than Kipchoge’s world record.

However, Kamworor hasn’t run a marathon other than New York City since 2014, and New York is not a course for fast times with its bridges and undulations.

“I don’t have any specific time,” goal for Sunday, said Kamworor, who held off surging countryman Wilson Kipsang by three seconds last year.

Kamworor remembers learning of Kipchoge’s world-record 2:01:39 at the Berlin Marathon on Sept. 16.

“I was not so much surprised,” he said. “I’m optimistic that in the future maybe I’ll try to break it.”

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2022 Ironman Kona World Championships results

Ironman Kona World Championships
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2022 Ironman Kona World Championship top-10 results and notables (full, searchable pro and age group results are here) …

Pro Women
1. Chelsea Sodaro (USA) — 8:33:46
2. Lucy Charles-Barclay (GBR) — 8:41:37
3. Anne Haug (GER) — 8:42:22
4. Laura Philipp (GER) — 8:50:31
5. Lisa Norden (SWE) — 8:54:43
6. Fenella Langridge (GBR) — 8:56:26
7. Sarah Crowley (AUS) — 9:01:58
8. Daniela Ryf (SUI) — 9:02:26
9. Skye Moench (USA) — 9:04:31
10. Laura Siddall (GBR) — 9:07:49
16. Heather Jackson (USA) — 9:22:17
DNF. Sarah True (USA)

Pro Men
Race is on Saturday, live on Peacock at 12 p.m. ET.

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Chelsea Sodaro wins Ironman Kona World Championship, ends American drought

Chelsea Sodaro
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Chelsea Sodaro was the surprise winner of the Ironman Kona World Championships women’s race, ending the longest American victory drought in the event’s 44-year history.

Sodaro, a 33-year-old mom to an 18-month-old, prevailed in an unofficial 8 hours, 33 minutes, 46 seconds on Hawaii’s Big Island.

“My mind is a little bit blown right now,” she said in a finish area interview 25 minutes later, standing next to her daughter, Skylar. “This is the culmination of things being right in my life and having perspective. … This is freakin’ incredible, but the greatest gift at the end of the finish line is my little 18-month-old.”

Sodaro was in fifth place after the 2.6-mile swim and 112-mile bike, then recorded one of the fastest 26.2-mile marathon runs in event history (2:51:45) to win by 7 minutes, 50 seconds over Brit Lucy Charles-Barclay.

Swiss Daniela Ryf, who was eyeing her sixth Ironman world title, led after the bike but faded quickly on the run.

MORE: Ironman Kona Race Results

Sodaro, whose lone previous full Ironman was a second-place finish at June’s European Championships (reportedly in the second-fastest Ironman distance debut in history), became the first American to win in Kona since Tim DeBoom in 2002 and the first American to win the women’s race since Zimbabwean-turned-American Paula Newby-Fraser in 1996.

She is the first woman or man to win in their Kona debut since Brit Chrissie Wellington took the first of her four titles in 2007.

Sodaro (née Reilly) was an All-America runner at Cal, then placed 19th in the 10,000m at the 2016 U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials.

She turned to triathlon in 2017, made podiums on the World Cup circuit (just below the top-level World Series for Olympic hopefuls) and moved up to long-distance racing in 2018.

At the half Ironman distance, she was fourth at the 2019 World Championships, her last major championship start before the pandemic, pregnancy, childbirth and a move up to the full Ironman this year.

“I’m pretty stoked that I think I maybe get to take the rest of the year off and be a mom for a month or so,” Sodaro said.

The pro men’s race is Saturday, live on Peacock at 12 p.m. ET.

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