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2018 U.S. marathon rankings

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With the New York City Marathon in the books, the 2018 major marathon calendar is complete. It’s an opportune time to look at the U.S. rankings.

The fastest times reflect the prevailing storyline in U.S. road running — the women are outpacing the men on the global stage.

2017 marked the strongest year in U.S. female marathoning with five breaking 2:27 and nine breaking 2:30. This year is a close second, with four women breaking 2:27 and seven under 2:30. What’s more, the three fastest American women of 2017 were replaced completely by the three fastest women of 2018.

Four U.S. women are in the world top 100 for the year — Amy Cragg (18th), Sara Hall (76th), Shalane Flanagan (77th) and Molly Huddle (84th).

That doesn’t include Des Linden, who recorded the biggest marathon win for an American this year (in Boston) and Jordan Hasay, who last year became the second-fastest U.S. female marathoner of all time but did not race 26.2 miles this year due to injuries.

Just one U.S. man has broken 2:12 in 2018. If that holds, it will be the second occurrence in 17 years, along with 2013.

Galen Rupp, although out through the spring marathon season after foot surgery, is a massive favorite to win the Leap Day 2020 Olympic Trials. Rupp ranks 22nd in the world this year. The next-fastest American, Olympic teammate Jared Ward, is No. 262.

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MORE: New York City Marathon Results

Name Time Race Result
Galen Rupp 2:06:07 Prague WIN
Galen Rupp 2:06:21 Chicago 5th
Jared Ward 2:12:24 New York City 6th
Scott Fauble 2:12:28 New York City 7th
Elkanah Kibet 2:12:35 Chicago 13th
Shadrack Biwott 2:12:52 New York City 9th
Chris Derrick 2:13:08 New York City 10th
Aaron Braun 2:13:16 Chicago 14th
Jonas Hampton 2:14:19 Chicago 15th
Parker Stinson 2:14:29 Chicago 16th

 

Name Time Race Result
Amy Cragg 2:21:42 Tokyo 3rd
Sara Hall 2:26:20 Ottawa 3rd
Shalane Flanagan 2:26:22 New York City 3rd
Molly Huddle 2:26:44 New York City 4th
Des Linden 2:27:51 New York City 6th
Allie Kieffer 2:28:12 New York City 7th
Lindsay Flanagan 2:28:25 Frankfurt 13th
Stephanie Bruce 2:30:59 New York City 11th
Roberta Groner 2:31:01 New York City 12th
Carrie Dimoff 2:31:12 New York City 14th

Reno-Tahoe drops 2030 Winter Olympic bid

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If the U.S. bids for the 2030 Winter Olympics, it will not be with Reno-Tahoe.

The Nevada/California region ended its pursuit of becoming a U.S. bid city, at least for an Olympics in the near future. The U.S. is expected to bid for 2030, and the U.S. Olympic Committee last year named Reno-Tahoe, Denver and Salt Lake City as cities that expressed interest.

“We have maintained from the start that a Reno-Tahoe bid would have to make sense economically, environmentally and socially,” Brian Krolicki, chairman of the Reno Tahoe Winter Games Coalition, said in a press release. “Given the parameters and conditions presented, we cannot make the numbers pass muster. To continue, at this point, would be untenable and unwise.”

The coalition noted the Los Angeles 2028 Summer Games having exclusive Olympic marketing rights from 2019 through its Closing Ceremony as an obstacle.

The region hosted the 1960 Winter Games in Squaw Valley, Calif. Since, the U.S. has hosted two Winter Olympics — in Lake Placid in 1980 and Salt Lake City in 2002. It hasn’t hosted a Summer or Winter Games since, its longest drought since the 28-year gap between 1932 and 1960.

The International Olympic Committee vote in 2019 to choose the 2026 Winter Olympic host city could impact a potential U.S. 2030 bid. The remaining 2026 bidders are Calgary, Stockholm and an Italian bid with Milan and Cortina d’Ampezzo.

Calgary’s bid hinges on a public vote Tuesday. North America has never hosted back-to-back Winter Olympics.

Olympic host cities are traditionally chosen seven years beforehand.

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MORE: IOC board nominates 3 bids for 2026 Olympics

Shaun White eyes his longest break from snowboard contests

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Shaun White said he has no plans to compete in snowboarding this season, which would mark the first time he goes a full year without entering a contest.

“I normally take every season after the Olympics off to clear my head,” White said in a statement via his team. “This time around I’ll be filling my time with skateboarding.”

White said in July that he would lighten his snowboard schedule as he returns to skateboarding competition. The triple Olympic halfpipe champion is considering a Tokyo 2020 run in the new Summer Olympic sport.

White entered his first skateboard contest in years in September and called his performance “pretty terrible,” but not surprising given it was his first-ever bowl event.

White earned five X Games skateboard medals between 2005 and 2011, but all of those came in vert, which is not on the Olympic program.

“Honestly, I am here to see how things go,” White said at the September event in Marseille, according to Agence France-Presse. “I haven’t made a decision either way [on 2020], I just figured, want to have some fun, skateboard, come to France and then hopefully make a decision come new year if I’m really going to go for it or not.”

As for snowboarding, White has typically eased off in post-Olympic years. In 2010-11 and 2014-15, his only contest was the Winter X Games, according to World Snowboarding, whose results show that White’s longest break from contests was 11 months.

White has said he would like to go for a fifth Winter Games in Beijing in 2022. He would be 35, older than any previous Olympic snowboarding champion. He’s already the oldest halfpipe medalist.

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