USOC seeks to revoke USA Gymnastics as national governing body

USA Gymnastics
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The U.S. Olympic Committee is seeking to shut down USA Gymnastics in the wake of the Larry Nassar sexual-abuse crimes and several leadership changes.

“You deserve better,” USOC CEO Sarah Hirshland wrote in an open letter to the U.S. gymnastics community, two days after the world championships concluded.

Hirshland wrote that a review panel will be identified, a hearing will be held, a report will be issued, a recommendation will be made regarding USA Gymnastics’ status as a national governing body and the USOC board will vote, without detailing a timeline.

“You might be asking why now?” wrote Hirshland, who in July was named the USOC’s first permanent female CEO. “The short answer is that we believe the challenges facing the organization are simply more than it is capable of overcoming in its current form. We have worked closely with the new USAG board over recent months to support them, but despite diligent effort, the NGB continues to struggle. And that’s not fair to gymnasts around the country. Even weeks ago, I hoped there was a different way forward. But we now believe that is no longer possible.

“This is a situation in which there are no perfect solutions.”

USA Gymnastics’ board of directors said in a statement that it is “evaluating the best path forward for our athletes, professional members, the organization and staff” after the USOC issued a letter to USA Gymnastics initiating the complaint.

“USA Gymnastics’ board was seated in June 2018 and inherited an organization in crisis with significant challenges that were years in the making,” the statement read. “In the four months since, the Board has done everything it could to move this organization towards a better future. We immediately took steps to change the leadership and are currently conducting a search to find a CEO who can rebuild the organization and, most importantly, regain the trust of the gymnastics community. Substantial work remains — in particular, working with the plaintiffs and USA Gymnastics’ insurers to resolve the ongoing litigation as quickly as possible. We will continue to prioritize our athletes’ health and safety and focus on acting in the best interests of the greater gymnastics community.”

Hirshland called for changes in USA Gymnastics leadership on Aug. 31, not a month into her new role.

“Under the circumstances, we feel that the organization is struggling to manage its obligations effectively and it is time to consider making adjustments in the leadership,” she said then, adding that the USOC would be reaching out to the USAG board to discuss changes.

USA Gymnastics is without a CEO after Mary Bono resigned Oct. 16, four days after being appointed to the role.

Bono replaced Kerry Perry, who resigned after Hirshland’s August comments. Bono received criticism for a September photo of herself drawing over a Nike logo on a golf shoe tweeted from her account shortly after Nike debuted its advertising campaign featuring former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick.

Notably, Olympic all-around champion Simone Biles tweeted of Bono, “*mouth drop* don’t worry, it’s not like we needed a smarter usa gymnastics president or any sponsors or anything.” Nike is one of Biles’ sponsors.

Biles is among the more than 200 women who have come forward over the last two years claiming they were sexually abused by former team doctor Nassar under the guise of treatment. Biles was critical of Perry, who replaced Steve Penny, for not being vocal enough in support of the survivors.

“Gymnastics as a sport will remain a bedrock for the Olympic community in the United States,” Hirshland wrote. “We will ensure support for the Olympic hopefuls who may represent us in Tokyo in 2020.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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MORE: Simone Biles’ place in sports, more thoughts off gymnastics worlds

Eliud Kipchoge, two races shy of his target, to make Boston Marathon debut

Eliud Kipchoge Berlin Marathon
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World record holder Eliud Kipchoge will race the Boston Marathon for the first time on April 17.

Kipchoge, who at September’s Berlin Marathon lowered his world record by 30 seconds to 2:01:09, has won four of the six annual major marathons — Berlin, Tokyo, London and Chicago.

The 38-year-old Kenyan has never raced Boston, the world’s oldest annual marathon dating to 1897, nor New York City but has repeated in recent years a desire to enter both of them.

Typically, he has run the London Marathon in the spring and the Berlin Marathon in the fall.

Kipchoge’s last race in the U.S. was the 2014 Chicago Marathon, his second of 10 consecutive marathon victories from 2014 through 2019.

He can become the first reigning men’s marathon world record holder to finish the Boston Marathon since South Korean Suh Yun-Bok set a world record of 2:25:39 in Boston in 1947, according to the Boston Athletic Association.

In 2024 in Paris, Kipchoge is expected to race the Olympic marathon and bid to become the first person to win three gold medals in that event.

The Boston Marathon field also includes arguably the second- and third-best men in the world right now — Kipchoge’s Kenyan training partners Evans Chebet and Benson Kipruto. Chebet won Boston and New York City this year. Kipruto won Boston last year and Chicago this year.

American Des Linden, who won Boston in 2018, headlines the women’s field.

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2024 Tour de France to end with Nice time trial due to Paris Olympics

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The 2024 Tour de France will end on the French Riviera instead of the French capital because of the Paris Olympics.

The finish of cycling’s marquee race leaves Paris for the first time since 1905.

Tour organizers said on Thursday the last stage of its 111th race will take place in the Mediterranean resort of Nice on July 21. Five days later, Paris opens the Olympics.

Because of security and logistical reasons, the French capital won’t have its traditional Tour finish on the Champs-Elysees. Parting with tradition of a sprint on the Champs-Elysees, the last stage will be an individual time trial along Nice’s famed Promenade des Anglais.

The start of the 2024 race, which will begin for the first time in Italy, was brought forward by one week, a customary change during an Olympic year. The Tour will start on June 29 in Florence.

Nice has hosted the Tour 37 times, including its start twice, in 1981 and in 2020. Two years ago, the start was delayed until Aug. 29 due to lockdowns and travels bans during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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