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Ron Galimore, USA Gymnastics COO, resigns

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INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Longtime USA Gymnastics chief operating officer Ron Galimore resigned Friday, the latest high-profile departure for the embattled organization in the wake of the Larry Nassar scandal.

The move came as USA Gymnastics is facing decertification of its status as the national governing body for the sport amid concerns about its leadership and the way it handled complaints against Nassar. The former team doctor is now serving decades in prison for sexual assault and possession of child pornography.

Nassar is accused of sexually abusing hundreds of female athletes under the guise of treatment at both USA Gymnastics and Michigan State.

USA Gymnastics did not comment on the move Friday beyond saying in a statement that its board accepted the resignation and wished Galimore “well in his future endeavors.”

Galimore released a statement Friday night, saying:

“I am proud to have served USA Gymnastics and its members for more than 24 years. I realize that changes are necessary as the gymnastics community moves forward in the wake of Larry Nassar’s horrific actions, which affected so many in our sport.

“I want to be clear that my resignation was not associated in any manner with the online discourse and media reports that have tried to link me to an effort to shield Nassar from scrutiny. I have spoken with investigators and been deposed concerning these matters, and am confident that I have always acted responsibly and with the best interests of athletes in mind.

“Gymnastics has been the center of my life since I was a kid. I resigned from my position with both a degree of sadness but also the hope that my departure may aid USA Gymnastics in pursuing its vision for a new beginning as it undergoes restructuring with a renewed sense of focus on creating a safe place for children to learn gymnastics.”

The Indianapolis Star reported in May that an attorney hired by USA Gymnastics directed Galimore to come up with a false excuse to explain Nassar’s absence at major gymnastic events in the summer of 2015. The organization was looking into complaints against Nassar at the time.

“We’ll let Ron know to advise people that you weren’t feeling well and decided to stay home,” Scott Himsel, an attorney hired by USA Gymnastics, wrote in an email, according to the newspaper.

USA Gymnastics is accused of covering up assault allegations. The group didn’t tell Michigan State or elite gymnastics clubs about complaints against him in 2015. The organization said it did not disclose the complaints out of guidance from the FBI.

Nassar publicly stated in September 2015 that he was retiring from the Indianapolis-based group, but he continued to see young women and girls for many months at his Michigan State office and a gym near Lansing, Michigan.

While there has been significant turnover atop the organization in the last two years — USA Gymnastics is currently searching for its fourth president and chief executive officer since March 2017 — Galimore remained on as its second-highest ranking officer. Though he kept a lower profile in recent months, he was a medal presenter at the world championships earlier this month.

Galimore’s continued presence had been a point of contention with Nassar survivors and vocal critics who wondered how committed USA Gymnastics is to changing its culture if it allowed Galimore to remain on board.

New USOC CEO Sarah Hirshland told the gymnastics community “you deserve better,” in an open letter released earlier this month. Hirshland said the challenges facing USA Gymnastics are more than it is capable of overcoming as currently constructed.

The organization is weighing whether to give up its status as a national governing body on its own or if it will try to convince the USOC that it can fix its problems and create an environment that puts an emphasis on athlete safety, wellness and overall transparency.

Galimore, a standout gymnast who was on the 1980 U.S. Olympic team that boycotted the Moscow Games, joined USA Gymnastics in 1994, initially working with the men’s program before moving into other areas within the organization.

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MORE: Another world champion comes forward as Nassar survivor

Great Britain gets first win at men’s ice hockey worlds in 57 years

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Lord Stanley would be proud. Great Britain’s men’s ice hockey team pulled off its biggest win in more than a half-century on Monday.

Great Britain beat France 4-3 in overtime at the world championship in Slovakia, in its last game of the tournament, to avoid relegation and remain in the top division of worlds in 2020 with the likes of the U.S., Canada and Russia.

France, whose streak of 12 straight top-level world championship appearances ends, had led 3-0 in the second period.

“We just don’t know when we are beaten,” golden-goal scorer Ben Davies said, according to Ice Hockey U.K. “This just underlines what GB is all about.”

It marked the Brits’ first win at a top-level worlds or Olympics since 1962. Great Britain last qualified for an Olympics in 1948. Its only top-level world championship appearance since 1962 was in 1994, when it lost all five games by a combined 44-7.

At these worlds, Great Britain was outscored 38-5 in its first six games, all losses. It came into the 16-nation event as the lowest-ranked team at No. 22 in the world.

“No one knows anything about U.K. hockey, and the first couple of days here people were laughing at us,” defenseman Ben O’Connor said, according to The New York Times, which reported that fans dressed as Queen Elizabeth II, Mary Poppins, Beefeaters, cricket bats and the Olympic ski jumper Eddie “the Eagle” Edwards to the Brits’ 6-3 loss to the U.S. last Wednesday.

(h/t @OlympicStatman)

MORE: Female hockey stars boycott pro leagues

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Caster Semenya enters Pre Classic in new event after testosterone ruling

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Caster Semenya is entered in the Pre Classic on June 30 to run the women’s 3000m, an event that does not fall under the IAAF’s new testosterone limits.

It’s the first announced meet for Semenya since the new IAAF rule capping testosterone in women’s events between the 400m and the mile went into effect. The Court of Arbitration for Sport denied her appeal and upheld the rule on May 1.

Semenya, the two-time Olympic 800m champion, has raced almost exclusively the 400m, 800m and 1500m up until this season.

She won an 800m on May 3 in the last top-level meet before the testosterone cap went into effect for those distances.

At that May 3 meet in Doha, Semenya reportedly said “hell no” when asked if she would take testosterone-suppressing measures to stay eligible for the 400m, 800m or 1500m at the world championships this fall.

Semenya also said she would keep competing but would not race the 5000m, the shortest flat event on the Olympic program that she could move up to without a testosterone cap, according to those same reports.

The flat 3000m is not on the Olympic program (though the 3000m steeplechase is).

South Africa’s track and field federation has indicated it will appeal the CAS ruling.

“I keep training. I keep running,” Semenya said May 3. “Doesn’t matter if something comes in front of me, like I said. I always find a way.”

The Pre Classic women’s 3000m also includes distance titans Almaz Ayana (Olympic 10,000m champion who last raced in 2017), Hellen Obiri (world 5000m champion), Genzebe Dibaba (1500m world-record holder) and Sifan Hassan (world bronze medalist at 1500m and 5000m).

The Pre Classic will be held at Stanford, Calif., this year due to construction at Oregon’s Hayward Field ahead of the 2020 U.S. Olympic Trials.

VIDEO: Noah Lyles edges Christian Coleman in photo finish

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