United World Wrestling

Jordan Burroughs reaches out to wrestler forced by referee to cut dreadlocks

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Olympic champion Jordan Burroughs offered his support to fellow New Jersey wrestler Andrew Johnson, who was forced by a referee to cut his dreadlocks in order to compete on Wednesday night.

Johnson, who is black, had a cover over his hair, but referee Alan Maloney, who is white, said that wouldn’t do.

Burroughs posted and spoke on social media early Saturday morning after researching what happened. Maloney was recommended by New Jersey’s high school athletics association not to be assigned to any events while the matter is under review.

Burroughs, a 2012 Olympic gold medalist and four-time world champion, said that Maloney was a referee for some of his matches while in high school. Burroughs’ school is 15 miles north of Johnson’s school.

“Let me tell you how sickening this is,” was tweeted from Burroughs’ account. “I’ve been wrestling for 25 years, at every level, and I have never once seen a person required to cut their hair during a match. This is nonsense. As a referee, you are required to check the hair and nails of all wrestlers BEFORE a match. My opinion is that this was a combination of an abuse of power, racism, and just plain negligence.”

Wrestlers are allowed to wear legal hair covers during matches, according to wrestling rules set by the National Federation of State High School Associations, NJ.com reports. If a wrestler’s hair in its natural state extends below the earlobe on the sides or touches the top of a normal shirt, it’s required to be secured in a hair cover.

Maloney came under fire in 2016 for using a racial slur against a black referee, according to the Courier Post newspaper. At a private gathering between officials at a condominium, Maloney allegedly poked referee Preston Hamilton, who is black, in the chest and allegedly used a racial slur during an argument over homemade wine. Hamilton slammed Maloney to the ground, according to the Courier Post.

Maloney told the newspaper he did not remember making the comments.

After Hamilton reported the incident, Maloney agreed to participate in sensitivity training and an alcohol awareness program. Maloney was to be suspended for one year for his use of the slur and Hamilton would receive the same suspension for assaulting Maloney. Both officials appealed their suspensions, which were overturned.

Burroughs said he would reach out to Johnson, calling him brave and courageous in a four-minute Instagram video:

“I didn’t want to talk about it or post anything on social until I actually was educated and knowledgeable about specifically what happened. Now that I’ve done a little bit of research, I feel like I can speak from a position in which I know what I’m talking about a little bit. …

“No. 1, Andrew Johnson, the young man that wrestled last night, congratulations on your overtime win and winning the dual for your teammate. That was a very courageous and a very brave thing that you did. … 

“The fact that with all the adversity and racism that you were facing in the moment, that you were still able to stay focused and go out there and get the W for your team, I respect that about your team.

“The fact that the parents and the coaching staff in that gymnasium allowed for you to be put in this position and didn’t protect you is absolutely shameful because although in that moment with the pressure of your peers and the dual victory on the line, I know that going out there and cutting your hair and getting your hand raised seemed like sticking it to the ref, but ultimately, you know what would have been more powerful? Walking away and saying, you know what, I’m keeping my hair. But man, I can imagine it must have been tough out there on the mat, right? …

“But it wasn’t your job. It was the parents’ job, and you guys let him down. The bottom line is this young man, especially young man in a traditionally and predominantly caucasian sport out there defenseless. You guys gotta help this young man. You’ve got to protect him. In high school, as you’re growing and you’re developing, you’re establishing who you are, you’re creating an identity. I know, as a young black man, how much my hair meant to me. And I also know, as a black man, how long it takes to grow dreads and how much discipline it takes to maintain them.

“The fact that you guys allow him to cut them matside? Look at this man after the match. He won the dual. He won the match in overtime. He showed no excitement, no exhilaration, no celebration. He just shook hands, and he walked off. That was for you guys. It wasn’t for him. So, as excited as you guys were in the stands, deep down inside he was hurting. He was hurt. And that wasn’t fair. So, Andrew, I’m sorry. Parents, come on, we’ve got to do better. Coaches, we’ve got to do better.

“As much as Andrew wanted to be the hero here, coaches, parents, adults, we have to intervene. Alan Maloney, bro, come on, you’ve got to stopped, dog. Like, you have been a referee since I was a kid. You reffed some of my matches when I was in high school, and this isn’t the first incident that you’ve had in South Jersey. I had a lot of respect for you, and I still have a lot of respect for you as a referee, but as an individual, as a man of character and integrity, there’s no way. Listen, you’ve got to step away from the stripes for a second. Put the whistle down and be a man. …

“[Maloney] can’t do this to a young dude. It’s a struggle for him. And it will be because now he’s got to go back to the crib with his head chopped. He went viral for something that he didn’t want to go viral for. Right? So now you’ve got to pay the consequences of your actions and the things that you did. 

“Basically, the bottom line is, Andrew, I’m sorry. Alan, you’ve got to be stopped. Man, you’re going to face consequences, and rightfully so. Parents and coaches, I love you guys. Continue to harbor a safe environment for this dude, right? Give him love. Give him respect. Give him honor. Encourage him. Andrew, you’re the man. I appreciate you. I’m going to be in contact with you very soon. So if you are listening to this, please send me a DM. I want to get in touch with you. I’m going to send you a few cool things for Christmas. I know it won’t help ease the pain, but hopefully it gives you a little bit of love.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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VIDEO: Kyle Snyder pinned in Rematch of the Century

Asbel Kiprop, Olympic 1500m champ, banned 4 years

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Kenyan Asbel Kiprop, the 2008 Olympic 1500m champion and a three-time world champ, was banned four years after testing positive for EPO in November 2017, according to track and field’s doping watchdog organization.

The ban is backdated to Feb. 3, 2018, when the 29-year-old was provisionally suspended after the failed test.

Kiprop repeatedly denied doping since last May, when he first acknowledged the positive test. Most recently, a 3,000-word defense from his lawyer was posted on Kiprop’s Facebook page.

Kiprop’s defenses included saying he was a victim of extortion and that he was offered “a reward” of becoming an anti-doping ambassador if he admitted guilt. The Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU), the IAAF’s independent organization to monitor doping and corruption, denied the latter last May.

A disciplinary panel dismissed six defenses from exonerating him, including the possibility his sample was spiked, in handing out the four-year ban.

Kiprop, the pre-eminent 1500m runner of the last decade, can appeal the ban.

At 19, he finished second in the Beijing Olympic 1500m but was upgraded to gold a year later after Bahrain’s Rashid Ramzi failed a drug test. He is the youngest Olympic 1500m medalist of all time, according to the OlyMADMen.

Kiprop went on to earn three straight world titles in the 1500m in 2011, 2013 and 2015, matching the feats of retired legends Noureddine Morceli and Hicham El Guerrouj.

He struggled in the 2012 and 2016 Olympics, finishing last in the London final with a hamstring injury and sixth in the Rio final won by American rival Matthew Centrowitz.

Kiprop has targeted El Guerrouj’s world record of 3:26:00, missing the mark by .69 of a second in 2015.

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Maggie Nichols is second woman in 20 years to repeat as NCAA all-around champ

Maggie Nichols
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Oklahoma junior and world champion gymnast Maggie Nichols became the first woman to repeat as NCAA all-around champion in 12 years, returning from a heel injury to compete on all four events for the first time since January on Friday.

Nichols, a Rio Olympic hopeful before being beset by a torn meniscus in 2016, joined 2004 Olympic silver medalist Courtney Kupets as the only women to win back-to-back NCAA all-arounds in the 2000s.

A junior, Nichols can next year join Jenny Hansen as the only women to three-peat in NCAA history.

Oklahoma goes for a third team title in four years on Saturday night against UCLA (featuring Olympic champions Madison Kocian and Kyla Ross), LSU and Denver.

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NCAA Women’s Gymnastics Championships Individual Results
All-Around
1. Maggie Nichols (Oklahoma) — 39.7125
2. Lexy Ramler (Minnesota) — 39.6625
2. Kyla Ross (UCLA) — 39.6625
4. Sarah Finnegan (LSU) — 39.65
5. Kennedi Edney (LSU) — 39.6

Vault
1. Kennedi Edney (LSU) — 9.95
1. Derrian Gobourne (Auburn)
1. Maggie Nichols (Oklahoma)
1. Kyla Ross (UCLA)

Uneven Bars
1. Sarah Finnegan (LSU) — 9.95

Balance Beam
1. Natalie Wojcik (Michigan) — 9.95

Floor Exercise
1. Alicia Boren (Florida) — 9.95
1. Lynnzee Brown (Denver)
1. Brenna Dowell (Oklahoma)
1. Kyla Ross (UCLA)