Mirai Nagasu makes commentating debut at U.S. Championships

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By Colton Wood

DETROIT – Mirai Nagasu sat tall in a chair in front of three cameras and two LED stage lights, which brought out the features of her face and brightened the white jacket she donned.

Instead of lacing up her skates for the 13th consecutive year at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships, Nagasu, the first American woman to land a triple Axel in Olympic competition, was behind a desk, holding a microphone.

Nagasu had hip surgery in September; her body isn’t fully healed yet to allow her to get back to competitive figure skating.

But Nagasu couldn’t see herself confined to watching nationals at her home, especially after seeing several of her idols – Kristi Yamaguchi, Meryl Davis and Charlie White – come to nationals year after year despite no longer skating competitively.

“Yes, they might all be Olympic champions, and I may have missed those qualifications,” Nagasu said, “but at the same time, I want to give back in a way that I’m capable of.”

She then reached out to U.S. Figure Skating, hoping to find a way to come to nationals in Detroit through a different route.

Shortly after that conversation, Nagasu was given the opportunity to join the Bridgestone Ice Desk crew as an analyst for nationals.

On Thursday, just moments before the pairs’ short program commenced, Nagasu had her broadcast debut.

“I’m used to being in front of the camera, and I enjoy it,” Nagasu said, “but being out on the Jumbotron and being live and not being able to make mistakes, is something I’m not always used to.”

Nagasu said she enjoys watching a multitude of different analytical shows, and realized that to be a broadcaster, you have to be quick on your feet and deliver your answers with “your own twist and your own personality.”

Sitting between host Nick McCarvel and former competitive skater Brooke Castile, Nagasu’s smile shone bright throughout her debut.

She looked confident, which Nagasu admitted was sometimes faked.

“Fake it ’till you make it,” she joked.

Nagasu said she wants to branch out of skating as well, and the opportunity to work on the Ice Desk is a prime beginning.

“For me to be given the opportunity to be a part of the Ice Desk, is something I am really grateful for,” she said. “I’m grateful to my skating and to have found it at such a young age; I think that’s where I’m at right now – being humble and being grateful for everything I have in my life.”

MORE: Scott Hamilton CARES Foundation brings skating stars to Detroit ahead of U.S. Championships

As a reminder, you can watch the U.S. Championships live and on-demand with the ‘Figure Skating Pass’ on NBC Sports Gold. Go to NBCsports.com/gold/figure-skating to sign up for access to every ISU Grand Prix and championship event, as well as domestic U.S. Figure Skating events throughout the season. NBC Sports Gold gives subscribers an unprecedented level of access on more platforms and devices than ever before.

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Brigid Kosgei, world record holder, to miss London Marathon

Brigid Kosgei
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World record holder Brigid Kosgei withdrew before Sunday’s London Marathon due to a right hamstring injury that has bothered her for the last month.

“My training has been up and down and not the way I would like to prepare to be in top condition,” was posted on Kosgei’s social media. “We’ve decided it’s best I withdraw from this year’s race and get further treatment on my injuries in order to enter 2023 stronger than ever.”

Kosgei, a 28-year-old Kenyan mother of twins, shattered the world record by 81 seconds at the 2019 Chicago Marathon. She clocked 2:14:04 to smash Brit Paula Radcliffe‘s record from 2003.

Since, Kosgei won the 2020 London Marathon, took silver at the Tokyo Olympics, placed fourth at the 2021 London Marathon and won this past March’s Tokyo Marathon in what was then the third-fastest time in history (2:16:02).

Ethiopian Tigist Assefa moved into the top three by winning the Berlin Marathon last Sunday in 2:15:37.

The London Marathon women’s field includes Kenyan Joyciline Jepkosgei, a winner in New York City (2019) and London (2021), and Yalemzerf Yehualaw, who was the Ethiopian record holder until Assefa won in Berlin.

The men’s field is headlined by Ethiopian Kenenisa Bekele, the second-fastest male marathoner in history, and Brit Mo Farah, a four-time Olympic champion on the track.

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Dmitriy Balandin, surprise Olympic swimming champion, retires

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Dmitriy Balandin, the Kazakh swimmer who pulled off one of the biggest upsets of the 2016 Rio Olympics, retired at age 27.

“Today I would like to announce the end of my sports career,” Balandin said last week, according to Kazakhstan’s Olympic Committee. “I am still inspired. A new phase of my life begins. I have a lot of cool projects in my head that will soon be implemented.”

Balandin reportedly has coaching aspirations.

In 2016, he won the Olympic men’s 200m breaststroke out of lane eight as the last qualifier into the final. He edged American Josh Prenot by seven hundredths of a second and became Kazakhstan’s first Olympic swimming medalist.

He followed that up with 11th- and 17th-place finishes in the breaststrokes in Tokyo last year.

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