Beyond the big three, are there any other U.S. figure skating stars?

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U.S. men’s skating is in good hands with Nathan Chen, Jason Brown and Vincent Zhou. Chen dominated Saturday’s short program at the 2019 U.S. Figure Skating Championships in Detroit, Michigan, earning a whopping 113.42 points. Brown and Zhou, just a few tenths of a point apart, sit more than 16 points ahead of the field.

Included in that field are a group of up-and-comers that have world and Olympic assignments in their sights – if they up their technical ante and mature their skating skills. This group isn’t yet competing with the likes of Chen, Brown and Zhou. They’re competing with each other.

“(The top three) have always been there, ever since I was juvenile,” Tomoki Hiwatashi, the 2016 U.S. junior champion who sat fourth after the short program in Detroit, said. “When I got first (place) in juvenile, Vincent got first in intermediate. Jason was already junior or senior, Nathan was novice first place.”

“They have always been ahead of me – more than a step or two, like 100 steps,” the 19-year-old added. “I’m just taking longer. I don’t think I should try too hard to catch up. Right now, I should let it go with the flow and catch up whenever I can.”

Hiwatashi, along with Alex Krasnozhon, Camden Pulkinen and Andrew Torgashev, have had the best U.S. results in international junior competition the last few seasons – except for Chen and Zhou, of course.

Tim Goebel, the 2002 Olympic bronze medalist and one of the first men to execute multiple quadruple jumps in his programs, thinks the quartet must continue to make their mark internationally before they can even think of challenging for medals at future U.S. Championships.

“For a lot of these guys on the threshold of making it, the senior ‘B’s (including Challenger Series events) are really important,” Goebel said. “Winning a medal at junior worlds this year would be great.”

“I think they all just need to figure out what are the quick wins and what are the big picture (elements)?” he added. “What can they improve between now and junior worlds, or a spring international? What is their two-year plan? You have to do the quads. You also have to do everything else, choreography, other jumps, spins. You have to be excellent at everything.”

MORE: Goebel inducted to Hall of Fame

For Hiwatashi, who trains in Colorado Springs under Christy Krall and Damon Allen, consistency is the challenge. He won bronze at the 2016 World Junior Figure Skating Championships and qualified for the Junior Grand Prix Final in December, but placed sixth after popping his triple Axel in the short program.

“When I was young I got every jump every time, easy,” he said. “When I came up to junior, it became harder for me to skate consistent. I feel like it’s mental. I’ve grown up, I’ve gotten more mature but I’ve also gotten more sensitive about what others say, how others look at me.”

The skater thinks he may have overthought things at the Junior Grand Prix Final. So in Detroit, he played it close to the vest, holing up in his hotel room and listening to anime music.

“Before the Junior Grand Prix Final, I was trying to get my mind ready and get everything in the right place,” Hiwatashi said. “I feel like that kind of made it worse for me. Now I’m just going in, skating and sleeping.”

Krasnozhon, who succeeded Hiwatoshi as U.S. junior champion and won the 2017 Junior Grand Prix Final, had a solid short in Detroit and sits fifth going into Sunday’s free skate. The 18-year-old, who trains in Plano, Texas under Aleksey Letov and Olga Ganicheva, is playing it conservative. He didn’t try his quad toe in the short and may not include it in his free skate.

“Right now the goal is placement, to make some kind of U.S. team, maybe Four Continents,” Krasnozhon said. “It’s not about landing more quads, it’s about doing the rest of the program clean, too. A quad may be worth only about 10 points and if you want to be competitive in the long program you need 80 or 90 technical points. So (you have to) focus on the big picture, do the triple Axels and all the triples well.”

Krasnozhon’s progress has been slowed by injuries. He won the short program at the 2018 World Junior Figure Skating Championships, but withdrew from the free skate after spraining three ligaments in his right ankle while attempting a quad Salchow. Soon after, he made a coaching change, moving to Letov and Ganicheva because, he said, they force him to be disciplined.

“I’m not the easiest athlete to work with,” he said. “I was with my other coaches (Darlene and Peter Cain) so long. It was hard, because I would take everything personally. Aleksey is able to keep me in a box, where I don’t get to say ‘no.’ He tells me what to do and where I’m headed.”

The skater landed quad toes and Salchows in practice in Detroit, and knows he will have to add them to both his short program and free skate eventually.

MORE: Jason Brown planning quad in Sunday’s free skate

“The biggest thing is, once you get one, you are set up for the others,” he said. “It’s a matter of getting the right quad. I was working on loop, then the Salchow got closer, and this year the toe happened. Finding that first quad and landing it clean and getting used to the rotations helps you with the others.”

Like Hiwatashi, Pulkinen and Torgashev train at Colorado Springs’ World Arena. Pulkinen, the 2018 U.S. champion who made his U.S. senior debut in Detroit, loves the intensely competitive environment.

“There is no day that’s easy, you’re always going to have someone who is going to lay it down,” the 18-year-old, who placed fifth at December’s Junior Grand Prix Final, said. “If you are not the one, then Vincent, Andrew, Timoki is going to lay it down. You never get a time to say, ‘I’ll take a breather at the boards.’”

Thus far, Pulkinen has been known more for his artistry and musical interpretation than for his quadruple jumps. He’s working with coaches Tom Zakrajsek and Tammy Gambill to add quads to his repertoire next season.

“I have a lot of goals,” he said. “I would love to go to Junior Worlds and medal, maybe win. I want a Grand Prix assignment (next season). I need better spins, improved choreography, so many things.”

At 17, Torgashev made his first mark in the junior ranks before the others. His impressive skating skills led him to the 2015 U.S. junior title, but in June 2015 he fractured his right ankle while practicing a quad toe loop.

Torgashev qualified for the Junior Grand Prix Final this season, but a fractured right toe forced him to withdraw. He spent eight weeks off of the ice, some of it in a walking boot, before resuming training around mid-November.

“I didn’t want to repeat mistakes of the past and let ego get in the way,” said Torgashev, who believes overtraining contributed to his 2015 ankle fracture.

“I’ve matured as a person, as a skater,” he added. “The best choice for my body and career was to sit that one out and let myself fully heal.”

Torgashev, who moved to Colorado Springs at the end of last season, has landed quad toes in competition. The challenge has been landing his triple Axel and quad in the same program.

“I’ve been working a lot on it, and Christy (Krall) has been working a lot with me to make sure I get the Axel and toe back-to-back,” he said. “I’ve put in a lot of work. I can do it, now it’s time to show people I can.”

MORE: Nathan Chen landing on his feet after turning life upside down

As a reminder, you can watch the U.S. Championships live and on-demand with the ‘Figure Skating Pass’ on NBC Sports Gold. Go to NBCsports.com/gold/figure-skating to sign up for access to every ISU Grand Prix and championship event, as well as domestic U.S. Figure Skating events throughout the season. NBC Sports Gold gives subscribers an unprecedented level of access on more platforms and devices than ever before.

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Chicago Marathon features Emily Sisson’s return, Conner Mantz’s debut, live on Peacock

Emily Sisson
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At Sunday’s Chicago Marathon, Emily Sisson makes her return, nearly three years after Olympic Trials disappointment. Conner Mantz makes one of the most anticipated U.S. men’s debuts in 26.2-mile racing.

It is not the norm, but an American will be one of the spotlight runners in both the men’s and women’s elite races at a major marathon. Peacock airs live coverage at 8 a.m. ET.

Sisson, 30, starts her first mass marathon since dropping out of the Olympic Trials on Feb. 29, 2020, her legs “destroyed” on the hilly Atlanta course where she started as arguably the favorite. She ran the virtual New York City Marathon later in 2020, but that was solo (and not in New York City). Her 2:38:00 isn’t recorded in her official results on her World Athletics bio.

Since, Sisson won the Olympic Trials 10,000m on the track and was the top American in Tokyo in 10th place. She moved back to the roads, winning national titles at 15km and the half marathon and breaking the American record in the latter.

Sisson vaulted into the elite group of U.S. female marathoners in 2019, when she clocked the second-fastest debut marathon in American history, a 2:23:08 on a windy day in London, where the early pace was slow.

At the time, it was the 12th-best U.S. performance all-time. In the last two years, Keira D’Amato, 37, and Sara Hall, 39, combined to run seven faster marathons. At Chicago, a flat course that produced a world record three years ago, Sisson can answer them and perhaps get close to D’Amato’s American record 2:19:12.

“I’m hoping sub-2:20,” coach Ray Treacy said, according to LetsRun.com. “With the [super] shoes and the training behind her, I would think that’s [worth] at least three minutes.”

It is less likely that Sisson can challenge for the win on Sunday given the presence of Kenyan Ruth Chepngetich, the 2019 World champion and defending champion in the Windy City. The 28-year-old mom is the fifth-fastest woman in history with a personal best of 2:17:08. And Ethiopian Ruti Aga, a podium finisher in Berlin, New York City and Tokyo with a best time of 2:18:34, though she has one marathon finish since the pandemic (a seventh place).

Like Sisson, Mantz has shown strong recent road racing form. The American men’s debut marathon record of 2:07:56 (Leonard Korir) is in play. If he can break that, Mantz will be among the five fastest U.S. marathoners in history.

Rarely has a U.S. male distance runner as accomplished as Mantz moved up to the marathon at such a young age (25). At BYU, he won NCAA cross-country titles in 2020 and 2021 and placed fifth in the Olympic Trials 10,000m, then turned pro and won the U.S. Half Marathon Championships last December.

“If everything goes as planned, I think sub-2:08 is realistic,” Mantz said in a Citius Mag video interview last month. “If everything goes perfect on the day, I think a sub-2:07, that’s a big stretch goal.”

The men’s field doesn’t have the singular star power of Chepngetich, but a large group of East Africans with personal bests around 2:05. The most notable: defending champion Seifu Tura of Ethiopia and 2021 Boston Marathon winner Benson Kipruto of Kenya.

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Alpine skiing to test new format for combined race

Alpine Skiing Combined
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Alpine skiing officials will test a new format for the combined event, a race that is under review to remain on the Olympic program.

French newspaper L’Equipe reported that the International Ski Federation (FIS) will test a new team format for the combined, which has been an individual event on the Olympic program since 1988. L’Equipe reported that a nation can use a different skier for the downhill and slalom in the new setup, quoting FIS secretary general Michel Vion.

For example, the U.S. could use Breezy Johnson in the downhill run and sub her out for Mikaela Shiffrin in the slalom run, should the format be adopted into senior competition.

The format will be tested at the world junior championships in January in St. Anton, Austria, according to the report.

In response to the report, a FIS spokesperson said, “Regarding the new format of the combined is correct, and our directors are working on the rules so for the moment the only thing we can confirm is that there will be this new format for the Alpine combined that has been proposed by the athletes’ commission.”

Some version of the combined event has been provisionally included on the 2026 Olympic program, with a final IOC decision on its place coming by April.

This will be the third consecutive World Cup season with no combined events. Instead, FIS has included more parallel races in recent years. The individual combined remains on the biennial world championships program.

L’Equipe also reported that the mixed team parallel event, which is being dropped from the Olympics, will also be dropped from the biennial world championships after this season.

“There is nothing definitive about that yet, but it is a project in the making,” a FIS spokesperson said in commenting on the report.

Vion said the mixed team event, which debuted at the Olympics in 2018, was not a hit at the Beijing Games and did not draw a strong audience, according to L’Equipe.

The World Cup season starts in two weeks with the traditional opening giant slaloms in Soelden, Austria.

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