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Chloe Kim gets fifth X Games SuperPipe gold

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In her first run in the X Games SuperPipe in Aspen, 18-year-old Chloe Kim fell, sitting down on the wall on her final hit. What the 2018 PyeongChang Olympic halfpipe gold medalist did next was equal to the mettle seen in champions well beyond her years.

While stuck in last place, Kim dropped in for her second attempt, opening with a frontside 1080, followed by a cab 720, into a frontside 540 and topping it all off with a McTwist. For Kim, and the incredible amplitude she is best known for, the run was uncharacteristically textbook. Therein lies the maturity shown by Kim. When she was down, she did what she needed to do to get win, despite wanting to leave the crowd breathless.

“I honestly wanted to do a complete[ly] different run,” Kim said after receiving her fifth X Games SuperPipe gold. “I was so bummed I wasn’t able to do it, so you know, [I’m] looking forward to the next one and super excited to do some cool stuff for you guys.”

Kim is now the first X Games athlete to win five gold medals by age 18.

Kim’s second run received 84.00 points from the judges, and in a best-of-three run event, hers was tops. Behind Kim taking silver and bronze where Spain’s Queralt Castellet and China’s Cai Xuetong.

The feel good story on Saturday came in men’s snowboard slopestyle, when Canada’s Mark McMorris needed to pull off some late-day magic to win gold. The two-time Olympic bronze medalist went big and pulled off a flawless third run for the win.

“This is dream-come-true type [expletive],” a surprised McMorris said while clutching his gold medal.

McMorris also won snowboard Big Air silver on Friday night in Aspen.

McMorris was severely injured in a 2017 backcountry snowboarding accident when he collided with a tree. His recovery and return to competition, which included a bronze medal win at the 2018 PyeongChang Olympics, seem to have exceeded even his own expectations.

Christian Coleman expects to be cleared in doping whereabouts case

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U.S. sprinter Christian Coleman, whose time of 9.81 seconds in the 100m is the fastest in the world this year, released a statement Saturday denying reports that he has missed three doping tests in 12 months, a “whereabouts” violation that could result in a two-year ban.

“I’m not a guy who takes any supplements at all, so I’m never concerned about taking drug tests, at any time,” Coleman said. “What has been widely reported concerning filing violations is simply not true. I am confident the upcoming hearing on September 4th will clear the matter and I will compete at World Championships in Doha this fall. Sometime after the hearing, I will be free to answer questions about the matter, but for now I must reserve and respect the process.”

U.S. Anti-Doping Agency records show the agency has tested Coleman 11 times through Aug. 20. The agency requires elite athletes to give “whereabouts,” a few details on where they expect to be each day, so that they may take out-of-competition tests.

The 23-year-old sprinter would be the heavy favorite in the world championships, following up his silver medal between Justin Gatlin and Usain Bolt in 2017, two months after he won the NCAA title. He is one of only eight athletes to break the 9.8-second mark in the 100m, and he posted the world’s best time in 2017 and 2018.

READ: Gatlin and Coleman beat Bolt in Jamaican star’s farewell championship

Since a loss to Noah Lyles in Shanghai in May, a race in which both Americans posted a time of 9.86, Coleman has won all three events he has entered — the Bislett Games in June, the Prefontaine Classic later in June, and the USATF Championships in July.

He withdrew from last week’s Diamond League meet in Birmingham.

The world championships start Sept. 27 in Doha.

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U.S. men’s basketball roster named for FIBA World Cup, includes one Olympian

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Kemba Walker and one player with Olympic experience, Harrison Barnes, headline the U.S. roster for next month’s FIBA World Cup, where the U.S. is still expected to clinch its Tokyo Olympic spot despite an absence of the NBA’s best players and Saturday’s exhibition loss to Australia.

An injured Kyle Kuzma was dropped from the 13 finalists who gathered in Australia for pre-tournament exhibitions. Walker and Khris Middleton are the only two players on the team who were All-Stars last season. The full roster:

Harrison Barnes, Sacramento Kings
Jaylen Brown, Boston Celtics
Joe Harris, Brooklyn Nets
Brook Lopez, Milwaukee Bucks
Khris Middleton, Milwaukee Bucks
Donovan Mitchell, Utah Jazz
Mason Plumlee, Denver Nuggets
Marcus Smart, Boston Celtics
Jayson Tatum, Boston Celtics
Myles Turner, Indiana Pacers
Kemba Walker, Boston Celtics
Derrick White, San Antonio Spurs

The U.S. group play schedule:

Sept. 1 vs. Czech Republic
Sept. 3 vs. Turkey
Sept. 5 vs. Japan

San Antonio Spurs coach Gregg Popovich will make his U.S. head coaching tournament debut at the World Cup, succeeding Mike Krzyzewski, who led the Americans to Olympic titles in 2008, 2012 and 2016.

Many notables dropped out before or during this month’s training camp and practices: including Olympians Anthony Davis, James Harden, Kevin Love and Kyle Lowry. Other 2020 Olympic hopefuls such as LeBron James and Stephen Curry withdrew before the camp roster was named.

It has become custom for the World Cup team to include few Olympians. The 2014 roster included two players from the London Olympics (Davis, Harden). The 2010 World Cup team had zero Beijing Olympians.

Saturday’s loss to Australia marked the U.S.’ first defeat with NBA players since the 2006 World Championship, snapping a 78-game win streak.

The U.S. will qualify for the Tokyo Games if it is one of the top two teams from the Americas at the World Cup. There is also a last-chance qualifying tournament next year.

MORE: Carmelo Anthony’s request denied to return to USA Basketball

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