After a crash left her paralyzed, Kristina Vogel pushes forward

AP
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As one of the most accomplished track cyclists of her generation, two-time Olympic gold medalist Kristina Vogel has spent much of her life under the lights of a velodrome.

But for a few moments on June 26, 2018, things suddenly went dark.

Vogel, then 27, was training for the team sprint on a concrete track in Cottbus, Germany. Another cyclist was standing on the track, but Vogel, traveling full-speed at about 37 miles per hour, didn’t see him, and they collided.

She can’t remember what happened next.

Vogel woke up on the track and saw her teammates running toward her. She asked one of them to hold her hand. Once her track shoes had been removed, Vogel realized she couldn’t feel her legs.

She was airlifted to a hospital in Berlin and placed in a medically-induced coma. When she awoke, Vogel was told she was paralyzed, though she would still have use of her arms and hands. But the news, she said, wasn’t surprising or even alarming. Vogel said she’d known it almost immediately when she opened her eyes on the track. “As fast as you can, [you] push forward,” she said in a recent phone interview. “[That’s] the thing that I did as a cyclist, day by day.”

Vogel, long a dominant sprinter, has one of her sport’s most impressive resumes: she’s a three-time Olympic medalist (two of them gold) and an 11-time world champion across three events: sprint, Keirin, and team sprint. Born in Kyrgyzstan and raised in Germany, she started cycling as a child, inspired by a poster she saw of E.T. riding a bicycle. After trying road cycling, Vogel switched to track, drawn in by its power and speed. At age 14, she moved away from home to attend sports school, and remembers her mother crying as she left.

Vogel’s promising career was threatened in 2009 when she was struck by a bus while pedaling up a mountain road, leaving her in a coma for two days. But giving up the sport she loved never crossed Vogel’s mind during her recovery. Three years later, she won Olympic gold in the team sprint.

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Vogel remembers agonizing pain in the days that followed last year’s accident. When everything hurt, she willed herself to focus on breathing. Beyond the physical ache was the realization that many of the activities she loved were ones she would no longer be able to do. Her day-to-day life, characterized by speed and intensity, suddenly slowed.

Vogel accepted that the next phase of her life would include the use of a wheelchair, but in those first few weeks especially, she said she missed stretching her legs and walking around.

Her partner, Michael Seidenbecher, a former German track cyclist, spent almost a month beside her bed, leaving only for a few minutes at a time.

“The hardest fights I had, I didn’t fight alone,” she said. “He was always sitting by my side. He gave me so much strength.”

She also received an outpouring of support from the cycling community, fans, and others who heard her story. “I was like, I think I have to fight for them,” Vogel said.

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Eight months after the accident, Vogel is keeping busy: she spends three days a week in physical therapy sessions at the hospital, strengthening her core and upper body. She’s channeled her athleticism into new sports, dabbling in archery, bowling, basketball and canoeing, but hasn’t decided if she wants to return to high-level competition. Vogel also said in a recent interview with CNN she is running for city council in Erfurt, her hometown.

She posts frequently on social media about her progress, showing little snippets of her life each time: smiling after lifting herself off the ground and into sitting position, climbing from her wheelchair into bed, and more recently, dancing. “It surprises me that other people come to me and say, ‘oh my gosh, I couldn’t do that,’” Vogel said. “…but that’s me.”

 

Vogel also savors the quiet moments that life as a top athlete didn’t always permit: “The main thing is to have time, just not to be in a rush,” she said. “I can go for coffee and I can sit there for a while, to not have it in the back of my head to go to training.”

She remains active in the cycling community, continuing to serve as a member of the athletes’ commission for the international cycling federation (UCI). She attended her first competition since the accident when the World Cup circuit came to Berlin in late November. “Weeks or months before, I didn’t know if I’d be fit enough to make it,” she said. But with the steely determination and grit that characterized her career as a cyclist, Vogel completed a lap around the velodrome in her wheelchair to an enthusiastic ovation from the crowd. “I had such a warm welcome,” she said.

She’ll be at the World Championships in Poland, which begin Wednesday, in a different role: as a commentator for the UCI. The event will mark the 10th anniversary of Vogel’s first appearance at Worlds, and she had hoped to win her 12th gold medal there.

Vogel admits she still has her lows, or “black moments,” as she calls them. Sometimes it’s when she’s downstairs at home and realizes she needs something on the second floor. Or occasionally, when kindness seems sparse: during a recent trip to the airport, Vogel and Seidenbecher were trying to get up a flight of stairs, needing one more person to help carry Vogel’s wheelchair. A man breezed by without offering to help. But Vogel says these moments don’t come often – once a week, maybe, or sometimes less frequently than that.

More often, Vogel is cheered by notes and messages from the people she’s inspired. Recently, over dinner with her sister, she was recognized by a woman at the restaurant who told Vogel she had cancer, and “…she knows she can deal with it because I’m dealing with my situation,” Vogel said.

“So the thing I say is that I’m not fighting alone.”

 

Olympic flame to travel by sea for Paris 2024, welcomed by armada

Paris 2024 Olympic Torch Relay Marseille
Paris 2024
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The Olympic flame will travel from Athens to Marseille by ship in spring 2024 to begin the France portion of the torch relay that ends in Paris on July 26, 2024.

The torch relay always begins in the ancient Olympic site of Olympia, Greece, where the sun’s rays light the flame. It will be passed by torch until it reaches Athens.

It will then cross the Mediterranean Sea aboard the Belem, a three-masted ship, “reminiscent of a true Homeric epic,” according to Paris 2024. It will arrive at the Old Port of Marseille, welcomed by an armada of boats.

Marseille is a former Greek colony and the oldest city in France. It will host sailing and some soccer matches during the Paris Olympics.

The full 2024 Olympic torch relay route will be unveiled in May.

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Paris 2024 Olympic Torch Relay Marseille
Paris 2024

Mikaela Shiffrin heads to world championships with medal records in sight

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Before Mikaela Shiffrin can hold the World Cup wins record, she can become the most decorated Alpine skier in modern world championships history.

Shiffrin takes a respite from World Cup pursuits for the biennial world championships in France. She is expected to race at least four times, beginning with Monday’s combined.

Shiffrin has a tour-leading 11 World Cup victories in 23 starts this season, her best since her record 17-win 2018-19 campaign, but world championships do not count toward the World Cup.

Shiffrin remains one career victory behind Swede Ingemar Stenmark‘s record 86 World Cup wins until at least her next World Cup start in March.

Shiffrin has been more successful at worlds than at the Olympics and even on the World Cup. She has 11 medals in 13 world championships races dating to her 2013 debut, including making the podium in each of her last 10 events.

ALPINE SKIING WORLDS: Broadcast Schedule

She enters worlds one shy of the modern, post-World War II individual records for total medals (Norway’s Kjetil Andre Aamodt won 12) and gold medals (Austrian Toni Sailer, Frenchwoman Marielle Goitschel and Swede Anja Pärson won seven).

Worlds take place exactly one year after Shiffrin missed the medals in all of her Olympic races, but that’s not motivating her.

“If I learned anything last year, it’s that these big events, they can go amazing, and they can go terrible, and you’re going to survive no matter what,” she said after her most recent World Cup last Sunday. “So I kind of don’t care.”

Shiffrin ranks No. 1 in the world this season in the giant slalom (Feb. 16 at worlds) and slalom (Feb. 18).

This year’s combined is one run of super-G coupled with one run of slalom (rather than one downhill and one slalom), which also plays to her strengths. She won that event, with that format, at the last worlds in 2021. The combined isn’t contested on the World Cup, so it’s harder to project favorites.

Shiffrin is also a medal contender in the super-G (Feb. 8), despite starting just two of five World Cup super-Gs this season (winning one of them).

She is not planning to race the downhill (Feb. 11), which she often skips on the World Cup and has never contested at a worlds. Nor is she expected for the individual parallel (Feb. 15), a discipline she hasn’t raced in three years in part due to the strain it puts on her back with the format being several runs for the medalists.

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