Tiger Woods
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Tiger Woods eyes 2020 Olympics but also faces questions

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FARMINGDALE, N.Y. — Tiger Woods knows how tough qualifying for the 2020 Olympics will be — tougher than qualifying for any PGA Tour event. The question is, will he go all in to make it to Tokyo?

“Would I like to play in the Olympics? Yes, I’ve never played in the Olympics, and I’m sure that I won’t have many more opportunities going forward at 43 years old now to play in many Olympics,” Woods said ahead of the PGA Championship at Bethpage Black on Tuesday. “Yes, that would be a first for me and something that I would certainly welcome if I was part of the team.”

To be part of the team, Woods must be ranked in the top 15 in the world and be among the top four ranked Americans on June 22, 2020. Via his Masters win, Woods is currently third among Americans in the Olympic golf ranking, according to Twitter guru Nosferatu.

It’s a precarious position with the likes of Brooks Koepka and Justin Thomas just off the bubble. Come next spring, when more Olympic qualifying points will be up for grabs, will Woods play more non-major tournaments to boost his ranking?

“Getting there and making the team is going to be the tough part,” he said. “How many events — how many events do I play, do I add a couple more to get in? These are all questions that will be answered going forward. I just know that if I play well in the big events like I did this year, things will take care of itself.”

True. Take the Masters win (although, come June 2020, it will have little effect on his Olympic ranking as more weight is given to 2020 events than 2019 ones).

Woods improved from seventh alternate for the U.S. in early April to the No. 2 American behind Dustin Johnson. He has since fallen behind Rio Olympic bronze medalist Matt Kuchar into third place, proving just how volatile qualifying can be.

In 2015, Woods said qualifying for the first Olympic golf tournament in 112 years in Rio was “very important.” September 2015 back surgery ended that Olympic bid, however.

In Rio, only three male golfers from the field of 60 were older than Woods will be come July 2020 — Thongchai JaideeAlex Cejka and Padraig Harrington. None of those men had to be ranked in the world top 15 to make their nations’ teams. That’s a necessary floor for a U.S. man given the depth.

A month before the Rio Games, Woods said he would prefer if the top 50 in the world automatically made the Olympic field.

“I just wish they would have had more quality of a field, similar to what we face in major championships, or the world golf championships, or the Players [Championship],” he said then. “We have these top-heavy fields, and I think the Olympics really deserve that.

“But I understand they’re trying to promote the game of golf and give more participants a chance to be part of the Olympic experience and be a part of golf. And try to get more of these countries that have not traditionally been part of golf to be a part of it, and for them to grow.”

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Boglarka Kapas, world champion swimmer, tests positive for coronavirus

Boglarka Kapas
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Boglarka Kapas, the Hungarian swimmer and world 200m butterfly champion, said she tested positive for the coronavirus.

“I don’t have any symptoms yet, and that’s why it’s important for you to know that even if you feel healthy you can spread the virus,” was posted on her social media. “Please be careful, stay at home and stay healthy.”

Kapas said her first test was negative but a second test showed she had the virus. She was staying in quarantine at home for two weeks.

Kapas, 26, won the 200m fly at last summer’s world championships by passing Americans Hali Flickinger and Katie Drabot in the last 25 meters. She clocked 2:06.78 to prevail by .17 of a second.

Kapas also took bronze in the Rio Olympic 800m freestyle won by Katie Ledecky.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Dan Hicks, Rowdy Gaines call backyard pool swim race

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Dan Hicks and Rowdy Gaines covered swimming together at the last six Olympics, including every one of Michael Phelps‘ finals, but they’ve never called a “race” quite like this.

“We heard you were looking for something to commentate during the down time….might this short short short course 100 IM help?” tweeted Cathleen Pruden, posting a video of younger sister Mary Pruden, a sophomore swimmer at Columbia University, taking individual medley strokes in what appeared to be an inflatable backyard pool.

“Hang on,” Gaines replied. “This race of the century deserves the right call. @DanHicksNBC and I are working some magic!”

Later, Hicks posted a revised video dubbed with commentary from he and Gaines.

They became the latest commentators to go beyond the booth to post calls on social media while sports are halted due to the coronavirus pandemic.

NBC Sports hockey voice Doc Emrick (who has also called Olympic hockey and water polo) did play-by-play of a windshield wiper installation.

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