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Lilly King grounded by her students before resuming Russian rivalry

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Lilly King amassed myriad titles in her four years in college: Olympic champion. World-record holder. Anti-doping advocate. The most recent is Miss King.

King, the world’s greatest and most outspoken breaststroker, spent the spring semester as a physical education teacher at Batchelor Middle School in Bloomington, Ind., near where she trains and studies as a PE major at Indiana University. King’s mom, Ginny, has taught for nearly 30 years after also swimming in college.

“I was pretty much completely in charge of a class, developed their lessons and tests and did their grades,” said King, who spent half-days at Batchelor for four periods in between her morning and afternoon swim practices. “Just like any other teacher would.”

It took two or three weeks for many of the early teens to learn that Miss King was not just another teacher.

“A lot of her kids were probably too young to remember the 2016 Olympics,” said fellow faculty member Sarah Dilts, who has seen King either teaching or observing at Batchelor since King was an Indiana freshman in 2015-16. “Then they realized on Instagram and Twitter that she was verified. They thought it was the coolest thing ever she had a blue check on Instagram.”

King competes an hour north of Batchelor at the FINA Champions Swim Series in Indianapolis on Friday on NBCSN and Saturday on Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA. Coverage airs 7-9 ET each night. NBCSports.com/live and the NBC Sports app stream coverage for subscribers.

It will be King’s first head to head with Russian rival Yuliya Efimova since the 2017 World Championships and their first time in the same pool in the U.S.

“That’s what I’m preparing for,” King said, noting a unique meet format with just four swimmers per event. “Looking forward to it if she is there.”

The teaching — including units on pickleball and soccer, as well as some sharbade — is proof of King’s assertion that she is multi-faceted.

King’s supervisor at the IU School of Public Health contacted Dilts last fall for potential placement. Dilts swam for the Hoosiers in the early 2000s and could understand the demands of a student-athlete taking on teaching.

“On and off I’d stop in and see what she was doing with the kids,” Batchelor principal Eric Gilpin said. “If you didn’t know the name, you probably wouldn’t know she was an Olympic athlete because of the way she handled herself.”

Dilts and Gilpin noted in separate interviews that King attended one of the middle school’s swim meets, which was not a requirement. She developed daily lesson plans, even for the weeks she was out of town for the Big Ten and NCAA Championships when other teachers implemented them.

“It may be a few years before she decides to teach [full-time],” Dilts said, “but I think any school would be lucky to have her.”

First, King embarks on a professional swimming career after exhausting her NCAA eligibility this past season. She plans to have a swimwear sponsor before the U.S. team departs for July’s world championships in South Korea.

She followed that finger-wagging, breakthrough Olympic 100m breast title by sweeping the 50m and 100m breast at 2017 Worlds, breaking the world record in each event (the 50m breast is not on the Olympic program). King relegated Efimova to bronze in the 100m and silver in the 50m, but the bitter rivals in Rio embraced in Budapest and appeared to share a joke. Efimova won her trademark event, the 200m breast, with King coming in a respectable fourth in her toughest distance.

“Honestly, at the end of an eight-day meet, we’re all so exhausted we don’t really know what we feel about each other at that point,” King said Wednesday. “It’s kind of difficult being really mean and nasty to someone all the time. We have good races, and we have a good rivalry. I guess there’s no point being nasty if I win.”

King must have felt satisfaction two weeks ago, when she swam the fastest times in the world this year in the 50m and 100m breasts, supplanting Efimova at the top of both rankings. Efimova has the fastest 200m time in the world of swimmers who could race it at worlds. American Annie Lazor, who didn’t make the world team, has the top time by 1.75 seconds.

King hasn’t lost sight of the 200m, even though the 100m is her bread and butter. She remembered coming back to Bloomington in 2016, and while tearfully struggling with the new, overwhelming attention, setting new goals.

“I want to win all the gold medals I can, and I want to set all the world records I can,” she said. King has every Olympic and world championship gold medal and world record available in the 50m and 100m, but none in the 200m. “Pretty simple. Swim the best. Be the best.”

After worlds, King will return to Bloomington and a new challenge: even younger pupils in the fall to fulfill graduation requirements.

“Which is terrifying because elementary school students kind of scare me,” King said. “Kids, you never know what’s going to happen. I always know what’s going to happen with my races.”

MORE: Olympic breaststroke champion retires at age 22

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U.S. Olympic 3×3 basketball qualifying teams named with former NBA player, WNBA stars

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Former NBA player Robbie Hummel and WNBA stars lead U.S. Olympic qualifying teams in the new Olympic event of 3×3 basketball.

The four-man and four-woman teams will compete in a global qualifier in India in March, each favored to grab one of three available Olympic berths per gender for the U.S.

Hummel, who unretired to become world champion in 3×3, is joined on the U.S. Olympic men’s qualifying team by Team Princeton teammates Canyon Barry and Kareem Maddox, plus Dominique Jones, who has played with Team Harlem. Team Princeton is guided by an investment firm CEO who once beat Michael Jordan one-on-one.

Last year, Hummel, Maddox and Barry (one of Rick Barry‘s sons) were part of a team that won the world title.

The U.S. women’s 3×3 qualifying roster is made up of WNBA stars Napheesa Collier, Stefanie DolsonAllisha Gray and Kelsey Plum. The U.S.’ top-ranked 3×3 player, as of last month, is Oregon star Sabrina Ionescu, who can’t play internationally this spring as she is in the thick of the NCAA season.

Olympic teams will not necessarily be made up of players from the qualifying tournament.

If the U.S. qualifies for Tokyo, it will then choose its roster(s) in a similar fashion to its traditional basketball teams — via selection committee. It’s unlikely active NBA players will be eligible.

Like with the qualifying tournament, two of the four Olympic players must be ranked in the top 10 among Americans in FIBA 3×3 rankings (as of a May 22 cutoff).

In 3×3, games last 10 minutes, or until one team reaches 21 points. Games are played on a half-court with a 12-second shot clock, and offense immediately turns to defense after a team scores.

MORE: Kobe Bryant embraced the Olympics, on and off the court

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First U.S. sailors qualify for Olympics; gold medalist misses on tiebreak

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The first five members of the U.S. Olympic sailing team were finalized this past weekend. The last American sailor to win an Olympic title missed on a tiebreaker.

Stephanie Roble and Maggie Shea (49er FX), Anna Weis and Riley Gibbs (Nacra 17) and Charlie Buckingham (Laser) qualified after world championships competition concluded in Australia. The U.S. Olympic roster across all sports is now at 43 qualified athletes.

The closest race for a U.S. Olympic spot came in 49er FX. Roble and Shea edged Paris Henken and 2008 Olympic champion Anna Tobias on a tiebreak. Roble and Shea, both first-time Olympic qualifiers, won Saturday’s medal race and earned an overall bronze medal.

That put the two U.S. duos in a tie in Olympic qualifying — combining placements from the 2019 and 2020 Championships, according to TeamUSA.org. The tiebreak went to Roble and Shea for having the better finish at this year’s worlds.

Tobias, a 37-year-old who won the individual 2008 Olympic Laser Radial as Anna Tunnicliffe, came out of retirement in a bid for a third Olympics. She left competitive sailing in 2014, took up CrossFit competitions and returned to crew for Henken more than two years ago.

“We are very sad and upset,” was posted on Tobias’ Instagram, “but we wish them [Roble and Shea] the best of luck.”

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