Lilly King beats Yuliya Efimova twice as rivalry resumes at FINA Champions Series

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Lilly King defeated Yuliya Efimova in a 200m breaststroke for the first time, then beat her Russian rival again 45 minutes later in the 50m breast for good measure.

King won the headline races at the FINA Champions Series stop in Indianapolis on Friday night, taking down Efimova in their first head-to-heads since the 2017 World Championships.

King, the Olympic and world champion in the 100m breast, gave up the lead in Friday’s 200m breast, then took it back to beat Efimova by two tenths of a second in the Russian’s trademark distance. King clocked a personal-best 2:21.39, the second-fastest time in the world this year.

“I wasn’t really expecting it,” King said.

Quite an effort from King, who just completed her NCAA career at Indiana while teaching at a Bloomington middle school. King missed the Rio Olympic final in the 200m breast and was fourth at 2017 Worlds, won by Efimova.

Friday’s 50m breast went truer to form. King, who lowered the world record to 29.4 at 2017 Worlds, beat Efimova by three tenths in 29.63. In the last event of the night, King and Efimova swam on the same mixed-gender relay team (drawn randomly) that finished fourth.

Remember that King sparked a rivalry with Efimova at the Rio Olympics, wagging her finger at a ready-room TV showing the Russian. King was not a fan of Efimova being allowed to compete after serving a doping ban. The next day, King relegated the 2015 World champion Efimova to silver in the 100m breast.

“It’s a lot less tense in the ready room,” now, King told media afterward. “At some point, we grow up and move on.”

Full FINA Champions Series results are here.

FINA Champions Series meets feature four swimmers per individual event. The two-day Indianapolis meet concludes Saturday at 7 p.m. ET on Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA and streaming on NBCSports.com/live and the NBC Sports app for subscribers.

In other events Friday, Ryan Murphy won a battle of Olympic champions in the 100m backstroke over Matt Grevers. The world-record holder clocked 52.99 seconds, moving to third in the world this year behind rivals Xu Jiayu and Evgeny Rylov.

Chase Kalisz topped all-American fields in the 200m butterfly and 200m individual medley. Kalisz’s biggest competition in the IMs at worlds should be Japan’s Daiya Seto, who is not in Indy.

In the 200m backstroke, Italian Margherita Panziera took down Olympic and world silver medalist Katinka Hosszu and Canadian Kylie Masse, the fastest in the world in 2018. Panziera clocked 2:06.64, edging Hosszu by three tenths.

Panziera, 23, didn’t make it out of the heats in Rio and was eliminated in the semifinals at 2017 Worlds. But this year, she has the world’s fastest time of 2:05.72, which would have won the 2016 Olympics.

Swede Sarah Sjöström extended her 100m butterfly dominance, beating U.S. champion Kelsi Dahlia by 1.13 in 56.42. It’s the fastest time in the world this year for the Olympic and world champion and world-record holder. Sjöström added a 100m free title 40 minutes later against a field that did not include Olympic and world champ Simone Manuel.

Anthony Ervin, who in Rio shattered the record for oldest individual Olympic swimming gold medalist at age 35, took fourth in the 50m freestyle, 1.03 seconds behind Russian Vladimir Morozov, who clocked 21.65. World champion Caeleb Dressel was not in the field.

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MORE: Japan’s Olympic champion swimmer to miss world champs

Aksel Lund Svindal, Olympic Alpine champ, has testicular cancer, ‘prognosis good’

Aksel Lund Svindal
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Aksel Lund Svindal, a retired Olympic Alpine skiing champion from Norway, said he underwent surgery for testicular cancer and the prognosis “looked very good.”

“Tests, scans and surgery all happened very quickly,” Svindal, 39, wrote on social media. “And already after the first week I knew the prognoses looked very good. All thanks to that first decision to go see a doctor as soon as I suspected something was off.”

Svindal retired in 2019 after winning the Olympic super-G in 2010 and downhill in 2018. He also won five world titles among the downhill, combined and giant slalom and two World Cup overall titles.

Svindal said he felt a change in his body that prompted him to see a doctor.

“The last few weeks have been different,” he wrote. “But I’m able to say weeks and not months because of great medical help, a little luck and a good decision.

“I wasn’t sure what it was, or if it was anything at all. … [I] was quickly transferred to the hospital where they confirmed what the doctor suspected. Testicle cancer.”

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2022 FIBA Women’s World Cup schedule, results

FIBA Women's World Cup
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The U.S. goes for its fourth consecutive title at the FIBA World Cup in Sydney — and eighth global gold in a row overall when including the Olympics.

A’ja Wilson, a two-time WNBA MVP, and Breanna Stewart, the Tokyo Olympic MVP, headline a U.S. roster that, for the first time since 2000, includes neither Sue Bird (retired) nor Diana Taurasi (injured).

The new-look team includes nobody over the age of 30 for the first time since 1994, before the U.S. began its dynasty at the 1996 Atlanta Games. The Americans have won 52 consecutive games between worlds and the Olympics dating to the 2006 Worlds bronze-medal game.

The field also includes host Australia, the U.S.’ former primary rival, and Olympic silver medalist Japan.

Nigeria, which played the U.S. the closest of any foe in Tokyo (losing by nine points), isn’t present after its federation withdrew the team over governance issues. Spain, ranked second in the world, failed to qualify.

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2022 FIBA Women’s World Cup Schedule

Date Time (ET) Game Round
Wed., Sept. 21 8:30 p.m. Puerto Rico 82, Bosnia and Herzegovina 58 Group A
9:30 p.m. USA 87, Belgium 72 Group A
11 p.m. Canada 67, Serbia 60 Group B
Thurs., Sept. 22 12 a.m. Japan 89, Mali 56 Group B
3:30 a.m. China 107, South Korea 44 Group A
6:30 a.m. France 70, Australia 57 Group B
8:30 p.m. USA 106, Puerto Rico 42 Group A
10 p.m. Serbia 69, Japan 64 Group B
11 p.m. Belgium 84, South Korea 61 Group A
Fri., Sept. 23 12:30 a.m. China 98, Bosnia and Herzegovina 51 Group A
4 a.m. Canada 59, France 45 Group B
6:30 a.m. Australia 118, Mali 58 Group B
Sat., Sept. 24 12:30 a.m. USA 77, China 63 Group A
4 a.m. South Korea 99, Bosnia and Herzegovina 66 Group A
6:30 a.m. Belgium 68, Puerto Rico 65 Group A
Sun., Sept. 25 12:30 a.m. France vs. Mali Group B
4 a.m. Australia vs. Serbia Group B
6:30 a.m. Canada vs. Japan Group B
9:30 p.m. Belgium vs. Bosnia and Herzegovina Group A
11:30 p.m. Mali vs. Serbia Group B
Mon., Sept. 26 12 a.m. USA vs. South Korea Group A
2 a.m. France vs. Japan Group B
3:30 a.m. China vs. Puerto Rico Group A
6:30 a.m. Australia vs. Canada Group B
9:30 p.m. Puerto Rico vs. South Korea Group A
11:30 p.m. Belgium vs. China Group A
Tues., Sept. 27 12 a.m. USA vs. Bosnia and Herzegovina Group A
2 a.m. Canada vs. Mali Group B
3:30 a.m. France vs. Serbia Group B
6:30 a.m. Australia vs. Japan Group B
Wed., Sept. 28 10 p.m. Quarterfinal
Thurs., Sept. 29 12:30 a.m. Quarterfinal
4 a.m. Quarterfinal
6:30 a.m. Quarterfinal
Fri., Sept. 30 3 .m. Semifinal
5:30 a.m. Semifinal
11 p.m. Third-Place Game
Sat., Oct. 1 2 a.m. Final