Noah Lyles becomes fourth-fastest man in history in 200m

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Noah Lyles responded to his first outdoor 200m defeat in three years with his fastest time ever, a 19.50 bettered only by Usain Bolt, Yohan Blake and Michael Johnson.

Lyles cemented himself as the world’s dominant half-lapper in Lausanne on Friday with the world’s fastest 200m since Usain Bolt‘s 2012 Olympic title. It’s the eighth fastest in history overall, and it came into a slight headwind.

Incredible time. Impeccable timing for a statement race.

Lyles lost to fellow 21-year-old American Michael Norman in his last 200m in Rome on June 6 (19.70 to 19.72), blemishing his sterling record since finishing fourth at the 2016 Olympic trials and turning pro out of high school.

On Friday, Lyles wore socks inspired by the Japanese superhero manga series My Hero Academia. “It’s time to go Plus Ultra,” he posted on social media before the meet, referencing the motto of the hero academy U.A. High School.

Next up for Lyles is a Diamond League 100m in Monaco next Friday against world champion Justin Gatlin.

Lyles has said he will race strictly the 200m at the USATF Outdoor Championships in two weeks, where the top three per event are in line to make the team for this fall’s world championships, but with every super sprint many are calling for him to double in the 100m and 200m.

Lyles is the joint-second-fastest man in the world this year in the 100m at 9.86 seconds, trailing only Christian Coleman. Norman is not expected to enter the 200m at nationals (his focus is the 400m), clearing the path for Lyles to easily qualify in that event.

Full Lausanne results are here.

In other events, Gatlin earned his first Diamond League 100m victory since Lausanne two years ago, pulling away and shutting it down in 9.92. The 37-year-old clocked 9.92 seconds, breaking 10 for the second straight week.

Gatlin was runner-up to Coleman at the Pre Classic on Sunday in 9.87, his fastest time since the 2016 Olympic trials. Coleman, the fastest man in the world every year in this Olympic cycle, was not in Lausanne. Gatlin has a bye into worlds as defending champion.

Double Olympic 100m champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce won the women’s 100m in 10.74, just .01 off the fastest time this year shared by Fraser-Pryce and countrywoman Elaine Thompson. Thompson, the Rio gold medalist, was not in the Lausanne field.

World silver medalist Salwa Eid Naser of Bahrain needed every bit of the second-fastest time in the world this year (49.17) to hold off Niger’s Aminatou Seyni, who lowered her national record from 50.24 to 49.19.

Olympic champion Shaunae Miller-Uibo of the Bahamas, who was not in Lausanne, remains fastest this year with a 49.05. Olympic silver medalist Allyson Felix has yet to race this season as she returns from childbirth.

Ethiopian Yomif Kejelcha won the 5000m after countryman Hagos Gebrhiwet miscounted the laps and sprinted to the finish line as the bell rang signaling one lap left. Gebrhiwet briefly celebrated before realizing his error and ending up 10th, 9.03 seconds behind Kejelcha’s 13:00.56.

Kenyan Timothy Cheruiyot won the 1500m in 3:28.77, the fastest time in the world since Cheruiyot’s personal-best 3:28.41 last July 20. Norwegian 18-year-old Jakob Ingebrigtsen lowered his personal best to 3:30.16 for second place.

Poland’s Piotr Lisek upset world champion Sam Kendricks and 2018 world leader Mondo Duplantis in the pole vault. Lisek had the world’s best clearance this year, 6.01 meters.

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Without their siblings, Green and Parsons find success at figure skating nationals

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GREENSBORO, N.C. – For the first time, Caroline Green and Michael Parsons are competing at the U.S. Championships without their siblings.

Green formerly teamed with older brother Gordon, and Parsons formerly danced with younger sister Rachel. Both Green and Parsons have seen success in Greensboro. When the championships were here in 2011, the Parsons won the novice dance title. When the championships were here in 2015, the Greens won the novice dance title.

Green, 16, and Parsons, 24, finished a satisfying fifth in the rhythm dance on Friday, after performing to “Cry-Baby” and earning 77.42 points. But they believe that this new partnership, with each other, has even greater potential.

“We definitely have some goals that are long-term,” Parsons said. “We’ve made a lot of progress this year – obviously, starting from zero. Nationals has been the culmination of our work so far. We’ve got a lot more to do, for sure.”

How far do they want to take their partnership?

“As far as we possibly can,” Green said.

NATIONALS: TV Schedule | Full Results

They grew up in the same rink under the same coaches in Washington, D.C., which is part of why they were able to team and find success so seamlessly – they had the same foundation for their skills and development. When their siblings left the sport, Green and Parsons skated together while trying to figure out their next steps. Their coaches took notice, and suggested a formal partnership.

“It’s a huge advantage for us because we’ve learned to skate the same way from the same coaches,” Parsons said after Friday’s rhythm dance. “We’ve always been under the same coaches. Just a huge amount of shared experience we’ve gained throughout the years together, we can apply to our new partnership.”

“Coming into this competition is where it really started to gel,” Green said. “All of our hard work separately started to come together.”

Even 2014 Olympic ice dance champion Charlie White spoke to their ability to come together so quickly on the NBC Sports Gold broadcast of the rhythm dance (full replay here for subscribers).

“I would guess – if I didn’t know – that they had been together for a number of years,” White said. “There’s just a maturity and a talent that they both possess that happens to match up really well. … I think that they have a very, very bright future.”

They’ve had a long season so far, competing six times before nationals. As a comparison, the top couples competed as few as three times.

“Our goal this season was to compete as much as humanly possible,” Parsons said. Green added that she was thankful for the added experience.

Green competed as a junior ice dancer last season and said it was “a bit of a shock” seeing the difference between the levels of competition from junior to senior events. Just last year, she won the junior national title with her brother.

“It was [a challenge] I think I took in stride and I feel like I’ve adapted pretty well,” she said.

“I couldn’t be more proud of her, the way she stepped up to senior. I’m a very happy partner,” Parsons said.

Green and Parsons trail fourth-place Christina Carreira and Anthony Ponomarenko by 0.6 points and sit 5.17 points out of bronze medal position. The U.S. has three spots to fill at March’s world championships, though it may not necessarily be the first, second and third place finishers.

The free dance is Saturday.

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MORE: ‘Nervous’ Gracie Gold stumbles in short program, but rebuilds herself to get this far

As a reminder, you can watch the events from the 2019-20 figure skating season live and on-demand with the ‘Figure Skating Pass’ on NBC Sports Gold. Go to NBCsports.com/gold/figure-skating to sign up for access to every ISU Grand Prix and championship event, as well as domestic U.S. Figure Skating events throughout the season. NBC Sports Gold gives subscribers an unprecedented level of access on more platforms and devices than ever before.

WATCH LIVE: U.S. Figure Skating Championships rhythm dance, women’s free skate

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Can Bradie Tennell hold off 14-year-old Alysa Liu? The U.S. Figure Skating Championships crowns its female medalists on Friday, live on NBC Sports.

Action starts with the rhythm dance at 4:30 p.m. ET for NBC Sports Gold subscribers, with NBCSN broadcast coverage joining in at 5. The women start at 7:25 on Gold, with NBC TV coverage starting at 8.

LIVE STREAM: Rhythm dance — Gold | NBCSN | Skate Order
LIVE STREAM: Women’s free skate — Gold | NBC | Skate Order

Tennell topped Thursday’s short program with a clean slate of jumps, plus the highest artistic score.

She bettered Liu in the short program last year, too, but fell in the free skate to take silver. Liu, meanwhile, landed two triple Axels to win by 3.92 points and become the youngest U.S. champion in history.

Another skater to watch is Gracie Gold, the two-time U.S. champion competing at nationals for the first time in three years. Gold, lauded for her return from an eating disorder, depression and anxiety, struggled with jumps in the short and is in 13th place of 18 skaters.

In the rhythm dance, past U.S. champions Madison Hubbell and Zachary Donohue and Madison Chock and Evan Bates are expected to begin a duel that should come down to Saturday’s free dance.

Key Skate Times
5:32 p.m. — Madison Hubbell/Zachary Donohue
5:38 — Kaitlin Hawayek/Jean-Luc Baker
5:44 — Madison Chock/Evan Bates
8:07 — Gracie Gold
10:03 — Karen Chen
10:11 — Amber Glenn
10:27 — Bradie Tennell
10:35 — Mariah Bell
10:43 — Alysa Liu

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NATIONALS: TV Schedule | Full Results

As a reminder, you can watch the events from the 2019-20 figure skating season live and on-demand with the ‘Figure Skating Pass’ on NBC Sports Gold. Go to NBCsports.com/gold/figure-skating to sign up for access to every ISU Grand Prix and championship event, as well as domestic U.S. Figure Skating events throughout the season. NBC Sports Gold gives subscribers an unprecedented level of access on more platforms and devices than ever before.