Geraint Thomas moves up in Tour de France top five shakeup

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ALBI, France (AP) — Tour de France rookie Wout Van Aert won a sprint to the line while Julian Alaphilippe kept the yellow jersey after contenders got trapped in an echelon in the final kilometers of Stage 10 on Monday.

Crosswinds caused the peloton to stretch and break up during the last 35 kilometers of the 217.5-kilometer trek from Saint-Flour to Albi. Defending champion Geraint Thomas reached the finish line in the main pack but Frenchman Thibaut Pinot and other favorites were caught off guard and lost time.

Pinot was in a group also including Rigoberto Uran and Richie Porte that lost 1 minute, 39 seconds, according to provisional results.

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The peloton split into three groups on a long section of road opened to the wind when Alaphilippe’s Deceuninck Quick Step teammates sped up the pace at the front to close the gap with six breakaway riders.

The fugitives were brought in with 25 kilometers left before Thomas’ Ineos teammates, working well with Alaphilippe’s team, pushed harder in an impressive display of collective strength.

Pinot used an expletive to describe his day.

“What do you want me to say? There’s nothing to say,” he said, looking absolutely disgusted.

Thomas moved to second place overall, 1:12 behind Alaphilippe, with teammate Egan Bernal in third place.

A three-time cyclo-cross world champion, Van Aert is riding his first Grand Tour after claiming two stage wins — a sprint and a time trial — at the prestigious Criterium du Dauphine in June.

“The last 70 kilometers were very nervous,” Van Aert said after edging Italian rider Elia Viviani by just a few inches. Australian Caleb Ewan ended third.

The up and coming Belgian said he got the OK from his team bosses to race for the win because his team leaders were in the group behind. But even then he didn’t expect to beat recognized sprinters such as Viviani and Sagan in a photo finish by inches.

“It’s crazy,” he said.

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David Rudisha escapes car crash ‘well and unhurt’

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David Rudisha, a two-time Olympic champion and world record holder at 800m, is “well and unhurt” after a car accident in his native Kenya, according to his Facebook account.

Kenyan media reported that one of Rudisha’s tires burst on Saturday night, leading his car to collide with a bus, and he was treated for minor injuries at a hospital.

Rudisha, 30, last raced July 4, 2017, missing extended time with a quad muscle strain and back problems. His manager said last week that Rudisha will miss next month’s world championships.

Rudisha owns the three fastest times in history, including the world record 1:40.91 set in an epic 2012 Olympic final.

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Tokyo Paralympic medals unveiled with historic Braille design, indentations

Tokyo Paralympic Medals
Tokyo 2020
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The Tokyo Paralympic medals, which like the Olympic medals are created in part with metals from recycled cell phones and other small electronics, were unveiled on Sunday, one year out from the Opening Ceremony.

In a first for the Paralympics, each medal has one to three indentation(s) on its side to distinguish its color by touch — one for gold, two silver and three for bronze. Braille letters also spell out “Tokyo 2020” on each medal’s face.

For Rio, different amounts of tiny steel balls were put inside the medals based on their color, so that when shaken they would make distinct sounds. Visually impaired athletes could shake the medals next to their ears to determine the color.

More on the design from Tokyo 2020:

The design is centered around the motif of a traditional Japanese fan, depicting the Paralympic Games as the source of a fresh new wind refreshing the world as well as a shared experience connecting diverse hearts and minds. The kaname, or pivot point, holds all parts of the fan together; here it represents Para athletes bringing people together regardless of nationality or ethnicity. Motifs on the leaves of the fan depict the vitality of people’s hearts and symbolize Japan’s captivating and life-giving natural environment in the form of rocks, flowers, wood, leaves, and water. These are applied with a variety of techniques, producing a textured surface that makes the medals compelling to touch.

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Tokyo Paralympic Medals

Tokyo Paralympic Medals