Getty Images

Carmelo Anthony’s request to play for USA Basketball denied, report says

1 Comment

Carmelo Anthony, the all-time U.S. men’s Olympic leading points scorer and the only male basketball player with three Olympic gold medals, reportedly expressed interest in unretiring from international play for next month’s FIBA World Cup.

The interest was not mutual from USA Basketball.

“I love Carmelo,” USA Basketball Managing Director Jerry Colangelo said at this week’s pre-World Cup training camp in Las Vegas, according to SI.com. “He made a great contribution. He was a very good international player. But for where we are and what we’re doing, that conceivably could have been a distraction. I understand why the request was made. He’s trying to reestablish himself. I think that has to be done in the [NBA].”

Anthony, 35, is a free agent and has not played in the NBA since his Houston Rockets tenure ended 10 games into last season.

Next year, Anthony will be older than any previous U.S. Olympic men’s basketball player. Larry Bird owns the age record of 35 from when he played on the Dream Team.

Anthony announced his retirement from Olympic basketball, and it was assumed international play altogether, moments after the Rio gold-medal game.

“I know this is the end. This is it for me,” Anthony said on NBC on Aug. 21, 2016, adding later, “I think I’ve given enough to Team USA Basketball. As much as I’m going to miss it, it’s time to pass it along to some of the guys who was on our team this year, but also to the younger guys coming along and give them an opportunity to be a part of something great. So, for me I’m hanging these [shoes] up, USA Basketball-wise.”

In what has become custom for the World Cup, nearly all of the 2016 U.S. Olympians bowed out of the selection pool this summer. Two — Harrison Barnes and Kyle Lowry — are among the 15 national-team players in camp this week, after which the 12-man World Cup roster will be named.

The U.S. will qualify for the Olympics if it is among the top two teams from North and South America at the World Cup. If the U.S. fails to achieve that, it can still qualify at a last-chance tournament in 2020.

MORE: Pan Am Games basketball game forfeited over wrong jerseys

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

David Rudisha escapes car crash ‘well and unhurt’

AP
Leave a comment

David Rudisha, a two-time Olympic champion and world record holder at 800m, is “well and unhurt” after a car accident in his native Kenya, according to his Facebook account.

Kenyan media reported that one of Rudisha’s tires burst on Saturday night, leading his car to collide with a bus, and he was treated for minor injuries at a hospital.

Rudisha, 30, last raced July 4, 2017, missing extended time with a quad muscle strain and back problems. His manager said last week that Rudisha will miss next month’s world championships.

Rudisha owns the three fastest times in history, including the world record 1:40.91 set in an epic 2012 Olympic final.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Caster Semenya laments lack of support, hints at trying other sports

Tokyo Paralympic medals unveiled with historic Braille design, indentations

Tokyo Paralympic Medals
Tokyo 2020
Leave a comment

The Tokyo Paralympic medals, which like the Olympic medals are created in part with metals from recycled cell phones and other small electronics, were unveiled on Sunday, one year out from the Opening Ceremony.

In a first for the Paralympics, each medal has one to three indentation(s) on its side to distinguish its color by touch — one for gold, two silver and three for bronze. Braille letters also spell out “Tokyo 2020” on each medal’s face.

For Rio, different amounts of tiny steel balls were put inside the medals based on their color, so that when shaken they would make distinct sounds. Visually impaired athletes could shake the medals next to their ears to determine the color.

More on the design from Tokyo 2020:

The design is centered around the motif of a traditional Japanese fan, depicting the Paralympic Games as the source of a fresh new wind refreshing the world as well as a shared experience connecting diverse hearts and minds. The kaname, or pivot point, holds all parts of the fan together; here it represents Para athletes bringing people together regardless of nationality or ethnicity. Motifs on the leaves of the fan depict the vitality of people’s hearts and symbolize Japan’s captivating and life-giving natural environment in the form of rocks, flowers, wood, leaves, and water. These are applied with a variety of techniques, producing a textured surface that makes the medals compelling to touch.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Five storylines to watch for Tokyo Paralympics

Tokyo Paralympic Medals

Tokyo Paralympic Medals