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Summer Rappaport clinches Olympic triathlon berth in tumultuous qualifier

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Former Villanova swimmer and runner Summer Rappaport earned a spot in the 2020 Olympic triathlon in a qualifying race Thursday morning in Tokyo (Wednesday night in the U.S.) that was beset by unusual circumstances.

The race had a shorter distance due to heat, a crash that took out top-ranked Katie Zaferes of the United States, and a disqualification of the top two finishers because they crossed the finish line together.

Rappaport, who won a World Cup race in June and finished second to Zaferes in a World Triathlon Series race in May in Yokohama, Japan, crossed the finish line seventh to earn the spot on offer for the highest-placed U.S. competitor in the top eight. If the disqualifications of British triathletes Jessica Learmonth and Georgia Taylor-Brown are upheld, Rappaport will move up to fifth.

Because no American finished on the podium, which would have opened the possibility of having two automatic qualifiers from Thursday’s race, another spot will be available in another qualifying race in May in Yokohama. Should the U.S. have three athletes in the top 30 of the Olympic rankings, a virtual certainty, the third pick will be discretionary.

Bermuda’s Flora Duffy will be the race winner if the disqualifications stand.

Rappaport and Zaferes finished the swim phase among the leaders and remained in the top three early in the bike phase.

But Rappaport wound up in the chase pack at the end of the bike phase, nearly two minutes behind a pack of  leaders that included American Taylor Spivey. Joining Rappaport in the chase pack were Taylor Knibb and Kirsten Kasper, who was also involved in the crash that ended Zaferes’ race.

Rappaport rallied in the running phase with the second-best time (16:36) of any competitor in the race.

Athletes ran 5 kilometers instead of 10km because of excessive heat that has afflicted Japan for weeks and contributed to the deaths of scores of residents, including an Olympic construction worker.

The heat also affected a test of the Olympic open-water course on Sunday, where swimmers reported excessive heat and some concerns that efforts to clean the water were not sufficient. The water temperature at 5 a.m. was 29.9 degrees Celsius (86 degrees Fahrenheit), just shy of FINA’s limit of 31 degrees (88 degrees). Concern over heat in the long distance swimming events ramped up after the death of U.S. swimmer Fran Crippen in 2010.

Triathlon’s organizing body, the ITU, has a slightly slower temperature limit of 30.9 degrees. The temperature at the race start Thursday morning was 30.3 degrees.

The men’s race takes place Friday morning in Tokyo (Thursday night in the U.S.).

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David Rudisha escapes car crash ‘well and unhurt’

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David Rudisha, a two-time Olympic champion and world record holder at 800m, is “well and unhurt” after a car accident in his native Kenya, according to his Facebook account.

Kenyan media reported that one of Rudisha’s tires burst on Saturday night, leading his car to collide with a bus, and he was treated for minor injuries at a hospital.

Rudisha, 30, last raced July 4, 2017, missing extended time with a quad muscle strain and back problems. His manager said last week that Rudisha will miss next month’s world championships.

Rudisha owns the three fastest times in history, including the world record 1:40.91 set in an epic 2012 Olympic final.

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MORE: Caster Semenya laments lack of support, hints at trying other sports

Tokyo Paralympic medals unveiled with historic Braille design, indentations

Tokyo Paralympic Medals
Tokyo 2020
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The Tokyo Paralympic medals, which like the Olympic medals are created in part with metals from recycled cell phones and other small electronics, were unveiled on Sunday, one year out from the Opening Ceremony.

In a first for the Paralympics, each medal has one to three indentation(s) on its side to distinguish its color by touch — one for gold, two silver and three for bronze. Braille letters also spell out “Tokyo 2020” on each medal’s face.

For Rio, different amounts of tiny steel balls were put inside the medals based on their color, so that when shaken they would make distinct sounds. Visually impaired athletes could shake the medals next to their ears to determine the color.

More on the design from Tokyo 2020:

The design is centered around the motif of a traditional Japanese fan, depicting the Paralympic Games as the source of a fresh new wind refreshing the world as well as a shared experience connecting diverse hearts and minds. The kaname, or pivot point, holds all parts of the fan together; here it represents Para athletes bringing people together regardless of nationality or ethnicity. Motifs on the leaves of the fan depict the vitality of people’s hearts and symbolize Japan’s captivating and life-giving natural environment in the form of rocks, flowers, wood, leaves, and water. These are applied with a variety of techniques, producing a textured surface that makes the medals compelling to touch.

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MORE: Five storylines to watch for Tokyo Paralympics

Tokyo Paralympic Medals

Tokyo Paralympic Medals