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Rafael Nadal reaches U.S. Open semifinals, carrying Big Three streak

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NEW YORK — Rafael Nadal is carrying the streak of the Big Three and trying to keep the 1990s generation smothered.

Nadal reached the U.S. Open semifinals with a 6-4, 7-5, 6-2 sweep of Argentine Diego Schwartzman on Wednesday night. Nadal squandered double-break leads in each of the first two sets before breaking again to close them out.

“Straight sets, but big challenge,” he said of the 2-hour, 46-minute match where he sweat profusely in the humidity. “I accepted the challenge.”

Nadal is the only man of the semifinalists who has Grand Slam final experience. He is the only man of the semifinalists born in the 1980s. No man born in the 1990s has won a Slam, and no man other than Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer has won a Slam since the start of 2017.

It’s all on Nadal after Djokovic and Federer bowed out injured in the fourth round and quarterfinals, respectively. Nadal’s path would appear clear to his 19th Grand Slam title, moving within one of Federer’s total for the first time in his career.

But then again, this U.S. Open has been far from predictable. Take Nadal’s semifinal opponent Friday.

No. 24 Matteo Berrettini, a 23-year-old Italian, never made it past the fourth round of a prior major. But he took out flashy French veteran Gael Monfils 3-6, 6-3, 6-2, 3-6, 7-6 (5) on Wednesday afternoon. Berrettini has never played Nadal, but remembers watching him on TV as far back as 2005. The Spaniard won an ATP title in five sets in Rome that pre-empted cartoons.

“I saw, like, a hundred of his matches,” Berrettini said. “Who in this tour doesn’t know Rafa?”

The other semifinal pits 78th-ranked Grigor Dimitrov against Daniil Medvedev, the villainous fifth seed who had never before made a Slam quarterfinal but has been red-hot this summer.

In women’s action, No. 13 Belinda Bencic of Switzerland and No. 15 Bianca Andreescu of Canada each made her first Grand Slam semifinal. The women’s semis are Thursday night, starting with Serena Williams against No. 5 Elina Svitolina of Ukraine.

Williams, eyeing a record-tying 24th Grand Slam singles titles, can identify with Nadal. She is the lone woman remaining who has Grand Slam final experience and the only one born in the 1980s.

U.S. OPEN DRAWS: Men | Women

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When Michael Phelps raced Libby Trickett at Duel in the Pool

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At the peak of his career, Michael Phelps was upstaged in a race by a swimmer who went four seconds slower.

Australian Libby Trickett did more than hold her own against Phelps to lead off the opening event of the 2007 Duel in the Pool, a mixed-gender 4x100m freestyle relay.

Trickett, then known as Libby Lenton shortly before she got married, became the first woman to break 53 seconds, while Phelps went 48.72 in a head-to-head at the Sydney 2000 Olympic swimming venue.

“I was trash-talking … asking what he has got and telling him if he is going to bring it tonight. I think deep down he was really scared of me,” Trickett said, joking, according to The Associated Press. “Before the race he said good luck. He is a good competitor to race against, and I will remember that for the rest of my life — that I raced against Michael Phelps.”

Australia went on to win the relay by 2.49 seconds, in large part because Trickett swam .31 faster than the women’s 100m free world record. Normally, relay leadoff swims are eligible to break individual world records.

But FINA later ruled that Trickett’s time was not record eligible because the mixed 4x100m free was not an approved event. (Mixed-gender relays debuted at the world championships in 2015 and will debut at the Olympics in Tokyo next year.)

“I am a little disappointed because I know in my heart what time I swam and that time is faster than the existing world record,” Trickett said in 2007, according to Swimming Australia. “However, having said that, the disappointment can take nothing away from the fact I now know I am capable of swimming under 53 seconds and I will continue to strive to improve every aspect of my swimming.”

Trickett broke the world record officially at the 2008 Australian Olympic Trials, clocking 52.88 to take .42 off German Britta Steffen‘s mark. The world record has since been lowered all the way to 51.71 by Swede Sarah Sjöström at the 2017 World Championships.

Phelps’ time was impressive, his second-fastest 100m free at the point in his career. He raced tired, two days after that year’s world championships finished in Melbourne. Phelps earned seven golds at those worlds, and he has said 2007 was his peak, rather than 2008.

He raced strategically against Trickett, not allowing her to draft off him in the adjacent lane.

“I remember going down the first lap, and she was kind of right at my shins,” Phelps said with a laugh, according to the Los Angeles Times. “I was like, ‘Oh, this is not good.’ I knew she would jump up on the lane line and kind of drag, the smart way to do it. I remember I was going right into the 50 [meter] wall, and I turned and went completely on the other side of the lane.”

Trickett won five golds at the 2007 Worlds and another four medals at the 2008 Olympics, though Steffen edged her for 100m free gold by .04.

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Who is Germany’s greatest Olympian?

Birgit Fischer-Schmidt
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The combined all-time German Olympic medal total (including East Germany and West Germany) trails only the United States and Russia/Unified Team/Soviet Union. Norway owns the most Winter Olympic medals of any single National Olympic Committee, but the Germany/East Germany/West Germany sum is actually greater. A look at five of Germany’s greatest Olympians …

Kathrin Boron
Rowing
Four Olympic Gold Medals

Alternated gold medals between double sculls and quadruple sculls from 1992 through 2004, the last one as a mom, tacking on a bronze in 2008. Boron also earned eight world titles. In 19 total Olympic and world championships starts, she collected 12 golds, five silvers, a bronze and a fourth. An ankle injury kept her out of the 1988 Olympics at age 18, or else she could have been the first woman to take gold at five Olympics.

Birgit Fischer-Schmidt
Canoe-Kayak
Eight Olympic Gold Medals

Considered by some the greatest Olympian in history. Fischer-Schmidt won 12 Olympic medals (in 13 career Olympic events) and 37 world championships medals from 1979-2005, scattered among four retirements, two childbirths and the 1984 East German boycott. Fischer-Schmidt retired after earning her last two world championships bronze medals in 2005 at age 43. Had Fischer-Schmidt extended to one more Olympics in 2008, she could have been on the same team as niece Fanny Fischer, who earned a gold of her own in Beijing.

Georg Hackl
Luge
Three Olympic Gold Medals

The only luger with three individual Olympic titles. Hackl was called the “Flying White Sausage” for his build and Bavarian roots, a nickname he opposed. His speed on the sled was not up for debate. Hackl finished second in singles and fourth in doubles in his Olympic debut in 1988. Then he won singles golds in 1992, 1994 and 1998 before bowing out in 2006. He then became a coach for the German team and its next luge great — 2010 and 2014 Olympic champion Felix Loch.

Claudia Pechstein
Speed Skating
Nine Olympic Medals

The only woman to compete in seven Winter Olympics. Pechstein owns Olympic titles in the 3000m, 5000m and team pursuit, the last medal of any color coming in 2006. At 48, she continues to race on the top international level, placing eighth, ninth and 11th at the world single distances championships in February, 28 years after her Olympic debut in Albertville, France. Pechstein served a two-year doping ban from 2009-11 over irregularities in her biological passport. She denied cheating and fought the ban in court for several years after its conclusion.

Isabell Werth
Equestrian
10 Olympic Medals

The most decorated Olympic equestrian with 10 medals and six golds. Werth, nicknamed the “Dressage Queen,” earned her first medals at the 1992 Barcelona Games and now, at 50, currently holds the Nos. 1 and 2 world rankings with two different horses. In 10 career Olympic events, she has never finished worse than second place. No other female Olympian can make that claim.

MORE: Most decorated U.S. female Olympian on front line of coronavirus fight

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