Getty Images

U.S. roster for world track and field championships

Leave a comment

Veterans Allyson Felix and Justin Gatlin and rising stars Christian ColemaenNoah Lyles and Michael Norman headline the U.S. roster for the world track and field championships that start next week.

While most athletes clinched spots at the USATF Outdoor Championships in July, the roster could not be completed until after the Diamond League season concluded two weeks ago. Diamond League Finals champions, in some cases, picked up extra roster spots for the U.S.

The U.S. has the fastest man in the 100m, 200m and 400m this year in Coleman, Lyles and Norman, plus the Diamond League 800m champion in Donavan Brazier.

Felix, coming back from November childbirth, will compete at a ninth worlds, breaking the U.S. record she shared with high jumper Amy Acuff. Felix was sixth in the 400m at nationals, putting her on the team for relays only.

Blake Leeper, the Paralympian who placed fifth in the men’s 400m, is not on the team. Leeper’s prosthetics have not been cleared by the IAAF for competition against able-bodied runners.

The full roster:

Men
100m
Christian Coleman
Mike Rodgers
Chris Belcher
Justin Gatlin
Cravon Gillespie (relay only)

200m
Noah Lyles
Christian Coleman
Rodney Rowe
Kenny Bednarek

400m
Fred Kerley
Michael Norman
Nathan Strother
Vernon Norwood
Michael Cherry (relay only)
Tyrell Richard (relay only)
Wil London (relay only)
Obichukwu Igbokwe (relay only)

800m
Donavan Brazier
Clayton Murphy
Bryce Hoppel
Brandon Kidder

1500m
Craig Engels
Matthew Centrowitz
Ben Blankenship

5000m
Paul Chelimo
Hassan Mead
Ben True

10,000m
Lopez Lomong
Shadrack Kipchirchir
Leonard Korir

110m Hurdles
Daniel Roberts
Grant Holloway
Devon Allen

400m Hurdles
Rai Benjamin
TJ Holmes
Amere Lattin

3000m Steeplechase
Hillary Bor
Stanley Kebenei
Andy Bayer

High Jump
Jeron Robinson
Shelby McEwen
Keenon Laine

Pole Vault
Sam Kendricks
Cole Walsh
KC Lightfoot
Zach Bradford

Long Jump
Trumaine Jefferson
Jeff Henderson
Steffin McCarter

Triple Jump
Donald Scott
Will Claye
Omar Craddock
Christian Taylor

Shot Put
Ryan Crouser
Joe Kovacs
Darrell Hill

Discus
Sam Mattis
Brian Williams
Mason Finley

Hammer
Conor McCullough
Rudy Winkler
Daniel Haugh

Javelin
Michael Shuey
Riley Dolezal

Decathlon
Devon Williams
Solomon Simmons
Harrison Williams

Women
100m
Teahna Daniels
English Gardner
Morolake Akinosun
Tori Bowie
Kiara Parker (relay only)
Caitland Smith (relay only)

200m
Dezerea Bryant
Brittany Brown
Angie Annelus

400m
Shakima Wimbley
Kendall Ellis
Wadeline Jonathas
Phyllis Francis
Courtney Okolo (relay only)
Jessica Beard (relay only)
Allyson Felix (relay only)
Jasmine Blocker (relay only)

800m
Ajee Wilson
Hanna Green
Raevyn Rogers
Ce’Aira Brown

1500m
Shelby Houlihan
Jenny Simpson
Nikki Hiltz

5000m
Karissa Schweizer
Elinor Purrier
Rachel Schneider

10,000m
Molly Huddle
Emily Sisson
Marielle Hall

100m Hurdles
Keni Harrison
Nia Ali
Brianna McNeal

400m Hurdles
Dalilah Muhammad
Sydney McLaughlin
Ashley Spencer
Kori Carter

3000m Steeplechase
Emma Coburn
Courtney Frerichs
Colleen Quigley
Allie Ostrander

High Jump
Vashti Cunningham
Inika McPherson
Tynita Butts

Pole Vault
Sandi Morris
Katie Nageotte
Jenn Suhr

Long Jump
Brittney Reese
Jasmine Todd
Shakeela Saunders
Tori Bowie

Triple Jump
Keturah Orji
Tori Franklin

Shot Put
Chase Ealey
Michelle Carter
Maggie Ewen

Discus
Valarie Allman
Kelsey Card
Laulauga Tausaga

Hammer
DeAnna Price
Gwen Berry
Brooke Andersen

Javelin
Ariana Ince
Kara Winger

20km Racewalk
Maria Michta Coffey

50km Racewalk
Katie Burnett

MORE: Jamaican runner whose heart stopped mid-race retires

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

When Michael Phelps raced Libby Trickett at Duel in the Pool

Leave a comment

At the peak of his career, Michael Phelps was upstaged in a race by a swimmer who went four seconds slower.

Australian Libby Trickett did more than hold her own against Phelps to lead off the opening event of the 2007 Duel in the Pool, a mixed-gender 4x100m freestyle relay.

Trickett, then known as Libby Lenton shortly before she got married, became the first woman to break 53 seconds, while Phelps went 48.72 in a head-to-head at the Sydney 2000 Olympic swimming venue.

“I was trash-talking … asking what he has got and telling him if he is going to bring it tonight. I think deep down he was really scared of me,” Trickett said, joking, according to The Associated Press. “Before the race he said good luck. He is a good competitor to race against, and I will remember that for the rest of my life — that I raced against Michael Phelps.”

Australia went on to win the relay by 2.49 seconds, in large part because Trickett swam .31 faster than the women’s 100m free world record. Normally, relay leadoff swims are eligible to break individual world records.

But FINA later ruled that Trickett’s time was not record eligible because the mixed 4x100m free was not an approved event. (Mixed-gender relays debuted at the world championships in 2015 and will debut at the Olympics in Tokyo next year.)

“I am a little disappointed because I know in my heart what time I swam and that time is faster than the existing world record,” Trickett said in 2007, according to Swimming Australia. “However, having said that, the disappointment can take nothing away from the fact I now know I am capable of swimming under 53 seconds and I will continue to strive to improve every aspect of my swimming.”

Trickett broke the world record officially at the 2008 Australian Olympic Trials, clocking 52.88 to take .42 off German Britta Steffen‘s mark. The world record has since been lowered all the way to 51.71 by Swede Sarah Sjöström at the 2017 World Championships.

Phelps’ time was impressive, his second-fastest 100m free at the point in his career. He raced tired, two days after that year’s world championships finished in Melbourne. Phelps earned seven golds at those worlds, and he has said 2007 was his peak, rather than 2008.

He raced strategically against Trickett, not allowing her to draft off him in the adjacent lane.

“I remember going down the first lap, and she was kind of right at my shins,” Phelps said with a laugh, according to the Los Angeles Times. “I was like, ‘Oh, this is not good.’ I knew she would jump up on the lane line and kind of drag, the smart way to do it. I remember I was going right into the 50 [meter] wall, and I turned and went completely on the other side of the lane.”

Trickett won five golds at the 2007 Worlds and another four medals at the 2008 Olympics, though Steffen edged her for 100m free gold by .04.

MORE: Most decorated U.S. female Olympian on front line of coronavirus fight

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

Who is Germany’s greatest Olympian?

Birgit Fischer-Schmidt
Getty Images
Leave a comment

The combined all-time German Olympic medal total (including East Germany and West Germany) trails only the United States and Russia/Unified Team/Soviet Union. Norway owns the most Winter Olympic medals of any single National Olympic Committee, but the Germany/East Germany/West Germany sum is actually greater. A look at five of Germany’s greatest Olympians …

Kathrin Boron
Rowing
Four Olympic Gold Medals

Alternated gold medals between double sculls and quadruple sculls from 1992 through 2004, the last one as a mom, tacking on a bronze in 2008. Boron also earned eight world titles. In 19 total Olympic and world championships starts, she collected 12 golds, five silvers, a bronze and a fourth. An ankle injury kept her out of the 1988 Olympics at age 18, or else she could have been the first woman to take gold at five Olympics.

Birgit Fischer-Schmidt
Canoe-Kayak
Eight Olympic Gold Medals

Considered by some the greatest Olympian in history. Fischer-Schmidt won 12 Olympic medals (in 13 career Olympic events) and 37 world championships medals from 1979-2005, scattered among four retirements, two childbirths and the 1984 East German boycott. Fischer-Schmidt retired after earning her last two world championships bronze medals in 2005 at age 43. Had Fischer-Schmidt extended to one more Olympics in 2008, she could have been on the same team as niece Fanny Fischer, who earned a gold of her own in Beijing.

Georg Hackl
Luge
Three Olympic Gold Medals

The only luger with three individual Olympic titles. Hackl was called the “Flying White Sausage” for his build and Bavarian roots, a nickname he opposed. His speed on the sled was not up for debate. Hackl finished second in singles and fourth in doubles in his Olympic debut in 1988. Then he won singles golds in 1992, 1994 and 1998 before bowing out in 2006. He then became a coach for the German team and its next luge great — 2010 and 2014 Olympic champion Felix Loch.

Claudia Pechstein
Speed Skating
Nine Olympic Medals

The only woman to compete in seven Winter Olympics. Pechstein owns Olympic titles in the 3000m, 5000m and team pursuit, the last medal of any color coming in 2006. At 48, she continues to race on the top international level, placing eighth, ninth and 11th at the world single distances championships in February, 28 years after her Olympic debut in Albertville, France. Pechstein served a two-year doping ban from 2009-11 over irregularities in her biological passport. She denied cheating and fought the ban in court for several years after its conclusion.

Isabell Werth
Equestrian
10 Olympic Medals

The most decorated Olympic equestrian with 10 medals and six golds. Werth, nicknamed the “Dressage Queen,” earned her first medals at the 1992 Barcelona Games and now, at 50, currently holds the Nos. 1 and 2 world rankings with two different horses. In 10 career Olympic events, she has never finished worse than second place. No other female Olympian can make that claim.

MORE: Most decorated U.S. female Olympian on front line of coronavirus fight

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!