Kyle Snyder, Abdulrashid Sadulaev
United World Wrestling

Kyle Snyder fueled by ‘Miracle’ scenes for Russian Tank showdown

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Kyle Snyder rewatched last year’s world wrestling championships final — where he was pinned in 68 seconds by Russian rival Abdulrashid Sadulayev — about five or 10 times, but not once in the six weeks leading up to a potential rematch at worlds on Sunday.

“I don’t want to watch myself get thrown on my back any more,” he said last week by phone from Germany, before traveling to Kazakhstan for the competition. “I have everything I feel like I need from the film.”

There wasn’t a whole lot to learn, technically, from a 68-second bout. Even if they are some of the most memorable 68 seconds in recent wrestling history.

Snyder-Sadulayev II at the 2018 Worlds was called the Rematch of the Century. In 2017, Snyder handed Sadulayev his first defeat in four years at the senior international level in the world final, a 6-5, last-minute comeback win. They were both Rio Olympic champions, but Sadulayev, nicknamed the Russian Tank, then moved up in weight to take on Snyder at 97kg.

But Snyder did change his mindset after last year’s loss, his first at an Olympics or worlds after earning titles in 2015, 2016 and 2017.

“Up until this year, I just thought that I could wrestle hard enough that I could beat people. It worked out well for a lot of tournaments,” said Snyder, who in Rio became the youngest U.S. Olympic wrestling champion in history at age 20. “I’ve prepared and learned more about Sadulayev and a couple more guys in my weight class that present some difficult challenges that I just want to understand more. I do well when I have something to focus on. I think that loss last year probably sparked this way of thinking.”

Sadulayev wrestles Snyder differently than he wrestles everybody else. Snyder learned this in the film room. They are about the same height, listed at 5-foot-11. Snyder posted a pre-match photo of them, at the same eye level, three weeks ago with the caption, “Lord willing, we stand here again.”

He tagged Sadulayev in it and said that the man from Dagestan commented back that he knows the fans are looking forward to their third installment.

“We’ve had a couple Instagrams back and forth, but no contact outside of that,” since the 2018 Worlds, Snyder said last week. “I’m sure I’ll see him next week in the hotel. So maybe a few awkward elevator rides.”

Snyder said that Sadulayev beat him last year by wrestling higher in his stance. Snyder was taken up out of his normal stance, and Sadulayev got to his leg for the pin.

“He does that because one of my best attributes is my hand fighting and my overall pace and staying in a stance low,” Snyder said. “If I get him down into his stance, he won’t be as comfortable.”

Snyder’s coaches told him for years to tailor training for specific opponents, but he more or less kept an approach of focusing on his own strengths. “It makes my mind clear when I don’t game plan,” he said. Now, he heeds the coaches.

“If I did a live go 100 percent, last year I wasn’t thinking at all how I would wrestle somebody I was competing against at worlds,” he said. “Now, I even have my partners give me different feels for different guys that I know are going to wrestle a specific way.”

He’s watched Sadulayev from afar. The Russian Tank looks as strong as ever.

Snyder changed his mental prep in another way recently. He supplemented daily Bible reading and his latest book, “Turning Points: Decisive Moments in the History of Christianity,” with scenes from “Miracle,” the Disney film about the 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team.

“I like the way the coach [Herb Brooks] talks about beating the Russians,” Snyder said. “The No. 1 thing is taking the action to them and being offensive, and I think about the comparison to the way I need to wrestle Sadulayev, if we wrestle again.” 

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Simone Biles reveals one thing she cannot do: Wear all her medals at once

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Three days after raising the record for world championship medals to 25, Simone Biles said her career total is a bit too much to wear at once.

“I’ve worn all five of them (from one world championship) for one time, but they’re pretty heavy, so I can’t imagine 25,” Biles said Wednesday on the “Today” show.

MORE: Mother and daughter share world championship experience

Last week, Biles became the first gymnast to win five gold medals at the world championships. She and her teammates ran away with the team gold, and she won the all-around by a staggering 2.1 points. She then won the vault, balance beam and floor exercise. Only a fifth-place finish in the uneven bars kept her from a sweep.

One event that stood out for her was the ever-challenging balance beam.

“Out of all of my performances this past week, the beam performance was one of my favorites, because I did it exactly like practice, and that’s what I’ve been training to do,” Biles said. “So it definitely helped my confidence.”

GYM WORLDS: Finals Results

Biles had her breakout performance at age 18, her first year in senior competition, in the 2013 world championships with a four-medal performance, including gold in the all-around and floor exercise. In 2014, she won those events again, along with the team event and the balance beam, and added a fifth medal on the vault. She matched that performance in 2015, then switched the vault and beam in her four-gold, five-medal performance in the 2016 Olympics.

After a post-Olympic break, she returned for the 2018 world championships to win medals in all six events, including four golds and a silver on the uneven bars, historically her least successful event.

She didn’t win six medals this year, but she took five golds for the first time. This year’s championships are also special because they’re almost certainly her last, with next year’s Olympics expected to be her last major competition.

Given all that, she’ll make more of an effort to go back and watch what she did.

“Most of the time I don’t want to see it, but this world championships was one of the best out of all five of them, so I definitely wanted to see my performances, so afterward, I would go and try to find it with my coach,” Biles said.

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Transgender track and field athletes now face same standard that has kept out Caster Semenya

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Transgender athletes will have to reduce their testosterone level to the same level applied to Caster Semenya and other athletes with Differences of Sex Development (DSD), under a new policy enacted by World Athletics (formerly the IAAF).

As with DSD athletes, the threshold for middle-distance runners has been lowered from 10 nanomoles per liter to 5.

“These Regulations have been drafted to align with the Eligibility Regulations for the Female Classification (Athletes with Differences of Sex Development) and include updates to reflect current medical standards and the legal framework,” World Athletics said in announcing the latest IAAF Council decisions.

The IAAF claimed a similar basis in medical standards last year when it announced its updated policy on DSD athletes: “No female would have serum levels of natural testosterone at 5 nmol/L or above unless they have DSD or a tumour.”

Semenya, a two-time Olympic champion at 800 meters, challenged that limit in the Court of Arbitration for Sport but lost her case in May. Given a brief reprieve by a Swiss court, she ran the fastest 800-meter time of the year (1:54.98), but a higher court overruled her appeal. She did not compete in the recent world championships.

MORE: Semenya laments lack of support

Another athlete affected by the DSD policy, 2016 Olympic bronze medalist Margaret Wambui, told the Olympic Channel she was struggling to find a new direction after the rule was passed.

“It affected me a lot,” Wambui said. “I didn’t want to train or do anything. …

“Caster has fought for us. She has done her level best. She has tried, but we failed.”

VIDEO: Wambui: “No one chose to be born the way they are”

Transgender athletes have not yet been prominent in international track and field, though controversies have arisen at other levels, particularly in a Connecticut case in which high school athletes filed a Title IX complaint after losing to transgender athletes. The athletes who filed the claim said they were potentially at a disadvantage in terms of earning college scholarships.

The new World Athletics policy insists that its stipulations for transgender athletes are actually generous. “The decision limit also takes into consideration that, for clinical purposes, the Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline for Endocrine Treatment of Gender-Dysphoric/Gender-Incongruent Persons recommends that transgender females should have serum testosterone levels of less than 50 ng/dL (i.e. approximately 1.7 nmol/L).”

But while DSD and transgender athletes face different issues, Semenya and other DSD athletes have set a precedent by withdrawing from competition rather than bring their levels down to the 5 nmol/L standard. In CAS proceedings, Semenya said she experienced regular fevers, night sweats, significant weight gain and constant abdominal pain while taking medication to meet the previous standard of 10 nmol/L.

The International Olympic Committee also put a 10 nmol/L limit in place for both transgender and DSD athletes in 2015. Some athletes have complained that transgender athletes still have an unfair advantage under that policy.

The World Athletics policy also addresses transgender men, granting them permission to take regulated testosterone supplements to bring levels within a typical range for men.

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