U.S. athletes fend off early world championship challenges in Doha

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Reigning champions Justin Gatlin, Emma Coburn and Christian Taylor advanced with ease through the early rounds of their title defenses Friday on the first day of track and field’s world championships in Doha, Qatar.

Gatlin comfortably won his heat to advance in 10.06 seconds. The fastest time in the heats belonged to Christian Coleman, who tore through the track to finish in 9.98 seconds despite shutting things down in the last 10 meters. U.S. veteran Mike Rodgers also advanced.

PREVIEW: Coleman, Gatlin and Blake set for 100m showdown

Coburn also advanced with ease, cruising along with a three-runner lead pack in the 3,000-meter steeplechase and wasting little effort down the stretch. Courtney Frerichs, a stunning second to Coburn in 2017, qualified by finishing second in her heat to top-ranked Beatrice Chepkoech of Kenya.

Taylor didn’t hit the automatic qualifying mark in the triple jump but was secure enough in his first-round effort of 16.99 meters to pass on his final jump. Will Claye, who has dueled with friendly rival Taylor many times in recent years, struggled with his first two jumps and qualified with a third effort of 16.97m despite taking off well behind the board. Donald Scott matched Taylor at 16.99m to qualify, also pulling through with a clutch performance in the final round, but fourth American Omar Craddock barely missed out on a tiebreaker.

The most unusual qualification effort belonged to Olympic silver medalist and 2017 bronze medalist Paul Chelimo who showed off a devastating finishing kick in the final few steps of his heat in the men’s 5,000 meters — even with one shoe missing. Hassan Mead also advanced.

Rai Benjamin stayed on track for a likely showdown with Norway’s Karsten Warholm in the men’s 400m hurdles. TJ Holmes also qualified for the next round.

The biggest surprises for U.S. athletes in Friday’s session were the early exits of hammer thrower Brooke Andersen and 800m runner Hanna Green. Andersen only managed a throw of 68.46m, far off her season best of 76.75m that ranks second in the world this year. Green, who is fifth on the season’s best list with a time of 1:58.19, faded to last place in a tightly packed slow heat.

Also in the women’s 800m, Ajee Wilson and Raevyn Rogers cruised to win their heats, and U.S. teammate Ce’Aira Brown advanced from a fast heat. Green and British hopeful Lynsey Sharp were among the surprise non-qualifiers. Reigning champion Caster Semenya is not in Doha because she has refused treatment to lower her testosterone level.

READ: Semenya will not go to Doha to collect belated 2011 medal

In the hammer throw, DeAnna Price needed only one throw to meet the automatic qualifying mark, and Gwen Berry also advanced.

Olympic long jump champion Jeff Henderson needed a strong third jump to qualify and sailed to an 8.12m mark, second only to Cuban star Juan Michael Echevarria. U.S. jumper Steffin McCarter sailed 8.04m to qualify as well.

Other U.S. field event favorites all advanced.

The pole vault trio of Sandi Morris, Katie Nageotte and Jenn Suhr all cleared the automatic qualifying height of 4.60m, though Suhr required a second attempt. They’ll have plenty of company, with 17 athletes clearing the bar.

Vashti Cunningham cleared the automatic qualifying height of 1.94m in the high jump, while teammate Tynita Butts advanced with a personal-best 1.92m. Inika McPherson did not advance.

TRACK AND FIELD WORLDS: TV Schedule | U.S. Roster

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Diana Taurasi returns to U.S. national basketball team

Diana Taurasi
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Diana Taurasi is set to return to the U.S. national basketball team next week for the first time since the Tokyo Olympics, signaling a possible bid for a record-breaking sixth Olympic appearance in 2024 at age 42.

Taurasi is on the 15-player roster for next week’s training camp in Minnesota announced Tuesday.

Brittney Griner is not on the list but is expected to return to competitive basketball later this year with her WNBA team, the Phoenix Mercury (also Taurasi’s longtime team, though she is currently a free agent), after being detained in Russia for 10 months in 2022.

Taurasi said as far back as the 2016 Rio Games that her Olympic career was likely over, but returned to the national team after Dawn Staley succeeded Geno Auriemma as head coach in 2017.

In Tokyo, Taurasi and longtime backcourt partner Sue Bird became the first basketball players to win five Olympic gold medals. Bird has since retired.

After beating Japan in the final, Taurasi said “see you in Paris,” smiling, as she left an NBC interview. That’s now looking less like a joke and more like a prediction.

Minnesota Lynx coach Cheryl Reeve succeeded Staley as head coach last year. In early fall, she guided the U.S. to arguably the best FIBA World Cup performance ever, despite not having stalwarts Bird, Griner, Tina Charles and Sylvia Fowles.

Taurasi was not in contention for the team after suffering a WNBA season-ending quad injury in the summer. Taurasi, who is 38-0 in Olympic games and started every game at the last four Olympics, wasn’t on a U.S. team for an Olympics or worlds for the first time since 2002.

Next year, Taurasi can become the oldest Olympic basketball player in history and the first to play in six Games, according to Olympedia.org. Spain’s Rudy Fernandez could also play in a sixth Olympics in 2024.

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Mo Farah likely to retire this year

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British track legend Mo Farah will likely retire by the end of this year.

“I’m not going to go to the Olympics, and I think 2023 will probably be my last year,” the 39-year-old Farah said, according to multiple British media reports.

Farah, who swept the 5000m and 10,000m golds at the Olympics in 2012 and 2016, was announced Tuesday as part of the field for the London Marathon on April 23.

Last May, Farah reportedly said he believed his career on the track was over, but not the roads.

London might not be his last marathon. Farah also said that if, toward the end of this year, he was capable of being picked to run for Britain again, he would “never turn that down,” according to Tuesday’s reports.

It’s not clear if Farah was referencing the world track and field championships, which include a marathon and are in Budapest in August. Or selection for the 2024 British Olympic marathon team.

The fastest British male marathoner last year ran 2:10:46, ranking outside the top 300 in the world. Farah broke 2:10 in all five marathons that he’s finished, but he hasn’t run one since October 2019 (aside from pacing the 2020 London Marathon).

Farah withdrew four days before the last London Marathon on Oct. 2, citing a right hip injury.

Farah switched from the track to the marathon after the 2017 World Championships and won the 2018 Chicago Marathon in a then-European record time of 2:05:11. Belgium’s Bashir Abdi now holds the record at 2:03:36.

Farah’s best London Marathon finish in four starts was third place in 2018.

Farah returned to the track in a failed bid to qualify for the Tokyo Olympics, then shifted back to the roads.

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