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Alberto Salazar, Mary Cain and Nike issue statements after Cain revelations

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After Mary Cain alleged physical and emotional abuse during her time working with coach Alberto Salazar at the Nike Oregon Project, Salazar and Nike released statements saying Cain had not raised such issues before and was even interested in returning earlier this year.

Cain responded, acknowledging that she had still believed she could improve her relationship with Salazar.

Nike stressed that Cain’s allegations were new and the company pledged to delve further into them.

“These are deeply troubling allegations which have not been raised by Mary or her parents before,” Nike said in a statement. “Mary was seeking to rejoin the Oregon Project and Alberto’s team as recently as April of this year and had not raised these concerns as part of that process. We take the allegations extremely seriously and will launch an immediate investigation to hear from former Oregon Project athletes. At Nike we seek to always put the athlete at the center of everything we do, and these allegations are completely inconsistent with our values.”

Salazar, in a statement to The Oregonian, said Cain’s father, a medical doctor, had been continually informed on Cain’s health regimens. He also reiterated his claim that, despite his four-year ban by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, he has never asked an athlete to take a banned substance.

Cain said she did indeed think she could find a way back to her old team and was in contact with Salazar. But contact between Cain and Salazar diminished, she said, and the USADA suspension of the coach helped her find her voice.

“No more wanting them to like me,” Cain said. “No more needing their approval. I could finally look at the facts, read others stories, and face: THIS SYSTEM WAS NOT OK.”

Last night, Cain described her growing willingness to share her story in an NBC Nightly News interview.

“I couldn’t have sat in front of a camera and told my story, and told it with power, before today,” she said.

Cain also spoke again with The New York Times, where she gave her initial statement, and described her conflicted emotions of “wanting to be free from him and wanting to go back to the way things used to be.”

Several athletes once associated with Nike and Salazar have either corroborated the treatment Cain described or said they experienced it themselves.

Some of the athletes speaking publicly on Cain’s behalf were also whistle-blowers who had spoken about Salazar and doping issues over the years, facing what they described as personal and professional setbacks as a result of their testimony.

Salazar has pledged to appeal his suspension to the Court of Arbitration for Sport. The case is not yet on the organization’s list of upcoming hearings.

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Boglarka Kapas, world champion swimmer, tests positive for coronavirus

Boglarka Kapas
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Boglarka Kapas, the Hungarian swimmer and world 200m butterfly champion, said she tested positive for the coronavirus.

“I don’t have any symptoms yet, and that’s why it’s important for you to know that even if you feel healthy you can spread the virus,” was posted on her social media. “Please be careful, stay at home and stay healthy.”

Kapas said her first test was negative but a second test showed she had the virus. She was staying in quarantine at home for two weeks.

Kapas, 26, won the 200m fly at last summer’s world championships by passing Americans Hali Flickinger and Katie Drabot in the last 25 meters. She clocked 2:06.78 to prevail by .17 of a second.

Kapas also took bronze in the Rio Olympic 800m freestyle won by Katie Ledecky.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Dan Hicks, Rowdy Gaines call backyard pool swim race

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Dan Hicks and Rowdy Gaines covered swimming together at the last six Olympics, including every one of Michael Phelps‘ finals, but they’ve never called a “race” quite like this.

“We heard you were looking for something to commentate during the down time….might this short short short course 100 IM help?” tweeted Cathleen Pruden, posting a video of younger sister Mary Pruden, a sophomore swimmer at Columbia University, taking individual medley strokes in what appeared to be an inflatable backyard pool.

“Hang on,” Gaines replied. “This race of the century deserves the right call. @DanHicksNBC and I are working some magic!”

Later, Hicks posted a revised video dubbed with commentary from he and Gaines.

They became the latest commentators to go beyond the booth to post calls on social media while sports are halted due to the coronavirus pandemic.

NBC Sports hockey voice Doc Emrick (who has also called Olympic hockey and water polo) did play-by-play of a windshield wiper installation.

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