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Alysa Liu tries to quickly get the jump on the Russians before the Junior Grand Prix Final

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OAKLAND, Calif. – Laura Lipetsky and Alysa Liu stood on an empty sheet of ice. They would have room to move, to do anything they wanted in the next 60 minutes, including the more technically demanding free skate they plan for the Junior Grand Prix Final.

There would be no having to deal with cones dividing the ice surface to accommodate newbie recreational skaters from a nearby school, some of them wobbling across the entire sheet during Liu’s usual afternoon training session. No working around 10 skaters of all levels and three other coaches, as in Liu’s usual morning session on the rink where banners celebrating her three national titles hang next to each other.

Twice a week at 11 a.m., if no one has bought the ice time, the supportive management of the Oakland Ice Center gives Liu and Lipetsky, her coach, one of the building’s two rinks all to themselves for an hour, free of charge. They get time and space. Enough of both for Liu to work on keeping up with rivals who are recalculating the sport’s fundamental theorems, who are breaking what had seemed an almost immutable continuum of physical advancement, all at warp speed.

The empty rink was cold. Not polar vortex cold like the one on the other side of the building, but frigid enough that Liu wore gloves and tights and a small skirt and a knee-length, hooded black parka over a waist-length white parka and a purple long-sleeved shirt as she warmed up and did some of her less challenging jumps.

Lipetsky laughed about Liu’s heavy clothing. “That’s our weight training,” the coach said, a wry allusion to the absence of any weights or exercise machines in the 24-year-old building.

Another skater passes banners noting Alysa’s three national titles – intermediate, junior, senior. (Phil Hersh/ NBC Sports)

Slowly, Liu shed the top layers swaddling her 4-foot, 10-inch body. She moved faster, attacking the more difficult jumps in her repertoire. While covered in all the seemingly burdensome clothing, weighing less than 100 pounds herself, she still did effortless triple flips. A few minutes later, with the top parka removed, she tossed off triple Axels.

“Now it comes off,” Liu said of the second parka.

And out came the quadruple Lutzes, the jumps with which Russians Alexandra Trusova and Anna Shcherbakova have revolutionized women’s skating this season.

Liu is not competing directly against them. The two 15-year-old Russians are first-year senior level skaters internationally, and the 14-year-old Liu is a first-year junior.

But the equally precocious Liu, the first U.S. woman to land a quad in competition (a Lutz) and the only one in the world ever to have done a triple Axel and a quad, already is preparing for that moment. (For the record: Liu did an Axel and a quad in the same program.)

“They are amazing,” Liu said of Trusova and Shcherbakova. “I look up to them, and I will try to follow in their footsteps.”

The workout continued. Liu landed a solo quad Lutz. Then another in combination with a triple toe loop, landing both jumps unsteadily. She asked to do the combination again, but popped the opening jump into just a double Lutz. Another try. Another pop.

Lipetsky was recording the attempts on her phone’s camera. She and Liu looked together at the video and discussed how the jumps came undone, with the skater clearly giving an opinion. Lipetsky has taught her the proper technique, and Liu quickly understands where she has gone awry.

Another quad Lutz-triple toe. A beauty. “That was a much better setup,” Lipetsky said. Liu’s face lit up.

Soon came the big reveal of this early November practice. Liu did a near flawless run-through of the free skate with the jumps she and the coach have programmed for the Junior Grand Prix Final this week at Turin, Italy. The first four jumping passes: triple Axel-double toe, quad Lutz-triple toe, quad Lutz, triple Axel. Both a quad in combination and a second quad are new in competition for Liu, additions she hopes can help get her onto the podium – or to a higher step – at the Final.

“Can we keep this on the down-low for a while, so the Russians won’t know until they see her in Italy?” Lipetsky asked.

“Or they will do all quads,” Liu said, with a grin.

The Russian women. The quads. There is no doubt they have become an obsession for everyone in the sport at both junior and senior levels this season.

That focus is especially true for rivals like Liu who hope to beat them, no matter that she already is one of only two young women among the six Junior Grand Prix Final qualifiers who has landed a quad. The other? A Russian, natch: Kamila Valieva, 13, the leading qualifier, who did two quadruple toe loops (falling on the latter), in the free skate of her second regular Junior Grand Prix event this season.

Valieva is one of four Russians among the six women in the junior final. She, Liu and Lee Hae-In of South Korea each won two events. Russia’s Kseniia Sinitsyna won the remaining event after having finished second to Valieva in another.

As hard as it is to compare scores, given different judges at each event, Junior Grand Prix results this season favor Valieva and Sinitsyna for the top two places in the Final, should they skate cleanly. Liu can close the gap because the mean base value for her four JGP programs, as calculated by skatingscores.com, was seven points higher than Valieva’s and 11 points higher than Sinitsyna’s for their four programs.

“You go into a competition wanting to win, so you need the other quad, for sure,” Lipetsky said. “Still, it’s not just the other quad but everything else, especially going against the Russians.”

Everything else includes both Grades of Execution (GOE) and program component scores (PCS), particularly the latter. Valieva and Sinitsyna have wiped out much of Liu’s base value advantage with higher GOEs. And those two Russians have had substantial PCS margins over Liu – some nine points for Valieva, 10 for Sinitsyna.

That explains why Liu is adding a quad.

And it also brings Italy’s Carolina Kostner into this story.

Carolina Kostner
Carolina Kostner performs during Stars On Ice in 2015 in Rome. Getty Images

FOR NEARLY A DECADE, four-time Olympian Kostner, 32, has been an exemplar of both figure skating artistry and of using athletic skating qualities, like speed, to increase the point-getting value of that artistry.

Kostner, the 2014 Olympic bronze medalist, 2012 world champion and five-time European champion, left competitive skating after the 2018 season. She had remained a contender against far more advanced jumpers at the end of her career because of her consummate skating skills, such as the flow of her edges across the ice, and because of the elegance of her body line and of her ability to reach audiences on an emotional level.

Kostner and Liu have the same choreographer, the estimable Lori Nichol, with whom the Italian has collaborated since 2006 and Liu since last spring. Once she knew Liu would be working with her, Nichol asked Kostner to join the process. Kostner agreed immediately.

“Lori is my mentor and inspiration,” Kostner said in a phone interview from New Brunswick, Canada a week before she finished performing on the two-month-long Rock the Rink tour. “She taught me how to connect skating with art. I give back to her and help her any way I can.”

Liu was thrilled.

“When I heard she was going to help me, I was like, ‘No way. She is one of the most beautiful skaters in the world,’” Liu said. “It is an honor to work with her.”

Kostner would work with Liu for two weeks last April at a rink in the Toronto suburb of Richmond Hills. Before the first session, Kostner had watched video of Liu’s triumphant, historic performances at last year’s U.S. Championships, where Liu, then 13, became the youngest U.S. singles champion ever, the first U.S. woman to land a triple Axel in the short program and the first to land two triple Axels in the free skate. Such jumps – and two errorless performances – allowed Liu easily to overcome a double-digit PCS gap against 20-somethings Bradie Tennell and Mariah Bell, who each fell in the free skate and finished second and third.

“I admired Alysa before meeting her,” Kostner said, “and I admired her even more after for her work ethic, her eagerness to learn and her humbleness to say, ‘Oh, yeah, that was wrong. I’m going to try it again and see how I can make it work.’”

Kostner and Nichol have been together so long the skater knows intuitively how to process what the choreographer tells her to do. When she saw that Liu sometimes was unfamiliar with what Nichol was asking of her, Kostner would explain it, usually by doing the movement herself or doing it alongside Liu. Sometimes, the veteran would simply share what was involved in every aspect of being an elite skater.

Among the many things they worked on, Kostner said, were line, speed, jump landings, and how to push off to start moving. They also focused on range of crossovers, when to make the crossovers short and fast, when to make them big and long.

“That’s a great start in showing a difference in her skating,” Kostner said of the varied crossovers. “To not be just busy, busy, busy but to show gliding ability, holding positions, elegance and effortlessness by doing a simple thing like a crossover in amazingly different ways. I think it is starting to show.”

For several years after Kostner won her first Italian senior title at age 15, she had simply bounded around the ice with the unfettered energy of a frolicsome fawn. Her first European medal, a bronze in 2006, came with PCS scores averaging in the mid-to-low 7s, not much above Liu’s scores on the Junior Grand Prix this season. PCS scoring certainly has been affected by grade inflation in recent seasons, but until the latter half of her 18-year senior career Kostner was recognized as much or more for her speed and enthusiasm as for her artistry.

“It’s not just a process of the body, of learning things and putting them into action, but also of the mind, of the maturity of a person, of a girl slowly becoming an adult,” Kostner said. “Alysa is very aware of the steps she has to take, and I saw her ready to take those steps and also to have the patience to go through the steps. It doesn’t happen overnight.”

Both look at what they have done together so far as the start of a long-term relationship. Since April, they have used video and video chat to continue the work. They plan another series of live sessions together in Italy after the Junior Grand Prix Final.

“Carolina has seen my Junior Grand Prix [performances], and obviously she saw some improvements, but there still are a lot of things I need to fix in my skating skills and other areas,” Liu said.

Alysa and coach Laura Lipetsky review video of a jumping pass on the coach’s phone. (Phil Hersh/ NBC Sports)

ALYSA LIU, WHO TURNED 14 IN EARLY AUGUST, HAS A REMARKABLE LACK OF ILLUSIONS about her strengths and weaknesses for someone so young who last January became an overnight sensation. She bantered breezily with Jimmy Fallon, appeared on the Today Show and was selected this month as one of Time magazine’s “100 Next,” a list the magazine said “spotlights 100 rising stars who are shaping the future of business, entertainment, sports, politics, science, health and more.”

“A lot of people think I’m really, really good. I’m very grateful they think that, and I respect their opinion,” Liu said, laughing.

“Others think I need to work a lot on my skating skills, that my spins aren’t fast enough, that I need to go faster into my jumps, that I need to get a lot better in the PCS areas. And they are right. I do need to improve all those things.

“I think I’m going to take a while to get really good. But obviously because the [2022] Olympics are so close, I need to do it faster.”

So, at this point in her skating life, with a scoring system richly rewarding triple Axels and quads, Liu and Lipetsky continue to put great emphasis on jumps. They know it is necessary to keep up with the current and future young Russian jumping jacks being rolled off coach Eteri Tutberidze’s assembly in Moscow. Tutberidze coaches all four Russian women in the Grand Prix Final as well as Valieva and another Junior Grand Prix Final qualifier, Daria Usacheva.

“I have a lot of respect for Eteri and everything she has done to push this sport to the next level,” Lipetsky said. “I think it’s great because it challenges skaters to push the limits even further.

“You have to step up your game to be even better if you want to look at the number one prize, which is winning the Olympics.”

Liu, junior national champion in 2018 and intermediate champion in 2016, had unsuccessfully tried quads in the regional qualifying for the senior 2019 U.S. Championships. She then shelved them until after her 2018-19 competitive season. It ended with a bang at nationals because her birth date was later than the cutoff date to be age eligible for even the junior world championships in 2019.

Her first “unofficial” quad success was a Lutz at the unsanctioned Aurora Games in Albany, N.Y., in late August. A week later, Liu landed an “official” quad Lutz with a positive 2.30 GOE at the Junior Grand Prix in Lake Placid, N.Y. Three weeks after that, she got a +1.81 GOE for the jump at the Junior Grand Prix in Gdansk, Poland.

Liu understands that she is striking while the iron is hot, that her strength-size ratio and light body make it easier to learn quads now. She is unconcerned by the widely expressed feelings that she and the other young phenoms will lose their ability to do the quads once their bodies change from girlish to more womanly outlines.

“It’s better if you learn them when you are small,” Liu said. “It will be a lot harder when you go through puberty. I think it’s best to get them once in your life, to experience it, even if you don’t keep them.

“I don’t think I will grow that much. So if I can just maintain my health and endurance and strength, I think I can keep the quads.”

The future health of the young women doing the quads has become a subject of considerable and well-intentioned debate. There are justifiable concerns that the physical demands and repetitive stress of doing quads may cause long-term damage to bodies that are not fully formed, especially at the growth plate areas in hips and knees.

Because the quad revolution in women’s skating began just two seasons ago, there is not anything near a body of evidence to suggest a definitive outcome or whether the evidence will be widely applicable. (The same uncertainty about future health also is true of men’s skating, where quads have been done for two decades but the number of quads in a free skate has increased dramatically since 2014.) For now, coaches and skaters are flying by the seat of their pants, trying to minimize risk by limiting the number of jumps done in practice.

Liu admits she might practice too many jumps if Lipetsky did not tell her to stop. The coach does that when she sees Liu is tired, as manifested by how the skater is feeling, by deteriorating jump quality from slow reactions or by not being able to push off as well for the jump setup.

The first of Liu’s three daily skating practice sessions concentrates almost entirely on choreography and skating skills; the third, when Liu is more likely to be tired, has few jumps. She sees a physical therapist on a weekly basis. Team Liu is holding off on adding a quad Salchow for the foreseeable future.

“We have to watch carefully,” said her father, Arthur. “If her body says no, she doesn’t do it. Whenever Alysa feels a little ache or pain, Laura stops her right away, and she goes to the physio.”

ON THE RINK THEY HAD TO THEMSELVES FOR AN HOUR, Liu and Lipetsky called it quits with 15 minutes to go.

Liu put back on the white parka, then the black one. She would wear them both for half her final training session of the day.

“The Russians do costume changes,” Lipetsky said, referring to Trusova unfurling part of one garment to reveal another in her short program and Shcherbakova doing the same in her free skate. “We’re going to start Alysa with all the layers and have her take one layer off, then another. That will be our costume change.”

Lipetsky was joking. But keeping up with the Russians, doing whatever might help beat them at their own game – which seems to be the game in women’s skating right now – is seriously on her mind. Neither she nor Liu has any desire to cover up that stark truth.

Liu eschews the skating mantra of, “I just want to skate my best.” Befitting an athlete who trains in Oakland, channeling late Raiders owner Al Davis, her mantra is more like his: “Just win, baby.”

“You never go into a competition wanting to get second or third,” Liu said. “Your goal should always be first, no matter who is at the competition, who the judges are or where it is located. Why skate if you are only thinking of second?”

Philip Hersh, who has covered figure skating at the last 11 Winter Olympics, is a special contributor to NBCSports.com/figure-skating.

MORE: Storylines to watch at the Grand Prix Final

As a reminder, you can watch the events from the 2019-20 figure skating season live and on-demand with the ‘Figure Skating Pass’ on NBC Sports Gold. Go to NBCsports.com/gold/figure-skating to sign up for access to every ISU Grand Prix and championship event, as well as domestic U.S. Figure Skating events throughout the season. NBC Sports Gold gives subscribers an unprecedented level of access on more platforms and devices than ever before.

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Trayvon Bromell emerged from destruction a new sprinter, new man

Trayvon Bromell
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For Trayvon Bromell, July 4 was an independence day. His first race as a rebuilt sprinter, more than four years after he first felt discomfort in his left heel.

It was also much more than that. Bromell, whose training base is Jacksonville, Fla., arrived in Montverde, off Lake Apopka just west of Orlando, for a meet called the Showdown in O-Town.

Exactly four years earlier, Bromell celebrated qualifying for his first Olympics at age 20.

Three years after that, 364 days before the Showdown, Bromell left that Montverde track and had his coach believing he might quit sprinting.

Finally, 10 days before last month’s comeback meet, Bromell learned that the woman who taught him to be a sprinter, from age 4 through high school, had died.

That coach, Garlynn Boyd, was supposed to be in Montverde on July 4 to watch Bromell.

The time came for heat five of the 100m. Bromell leaned into the starting blocks of lane two on a wet track. He felt the weight of the last few years. He sensed his arms shaking.

After at least one false start, Bromell ran. He won the heat in 10.04 seconds.

Bromell’s personal best is 9.84, but that he approached the 10-second barrier, which separates fast sprinters from medal-contending ones, after what he endured the last four years was very promising.

Bromell found his mom, Shri Sanders. She raised him, his two brothers and his sister, by herself in St. Petersburg. She prayed over him after the victory.

He raced again three weeks later. He ran 9.90 seconds, which would have earned bronze at the most recent Olympics and world championships.

Bromell’s speed was back, but in interviews he’s reflected more on a recent personal transformation. Aside from sprinting, Bromell told  Flotrack that he crawled out of “the destruction of my past,” “the downfall of my career” and “a real dark alleyway” in this Olympic cycle.

In an interview last week, Bromell declined to discuss specifics.

“I’ve got something coming out in the near future that’s going to speak and answer all the questions that people want to know,” he said, noting that it’s mostly related to mental health.

By 2013, the track world began to learn about Bromell, a 5-foot-8 high schooler who sprinted in shorts, not tights, and a headband.

He broke his left knee in eighth grade doing backflips, broke his right knee and forearm in ninth grade playing basketball and in 10th grade cracked a hip during a race.

Through all of that, he was coached by Boyd of the Lightning Bolt Track Club. Boyd began teaching Bromell how to be a sprinter before he started elementary school.

“We come from a bad area where poverty is big, and we didn’t really have a lot,” Bromell said of his family. “[My mom] worked all the time to make sure I was good, to make sure we had somewhere to live. When I went to practice, coach G was like another mom, to everyone, to every kid in the city who came in connection with us. She loved us. With my injuries in high school, my mom and coach G were the only people who believed I was special, even in times when I didn’t feel I was special.”

She fought diabetes for years — both of her legs were amputated — but Bromell didn’t know for sure her cause of death. St. Petersburg Times obituary reported she contracted the coronavirus before she died at age 54.

“I don’t even have the words to explain this pain I’m feeling,” was posted on Bromell’s Instagram the day of her death. “God knows that with everything in me, the world will know the lives you help change!”

In 12th grade, he became the first U.S. high schooler to break 10 seconds over 100m (albeit with too much wind for record purposes). Matthew Boling later broke Bromell’s record by .02.

Bromell, also a slot receiver at Gibbs High, passed on football interest from schools including West Virginia. He took a track scholarship at Baylor, known for producing Olympic 400m champions Michael Johnson and Jeremy Wariner.

“I don’t really like to put a kid in a box and say we expect this or that,” legendary Baylor coach Clyde Hart said in 2014. “I think he’s going to get better. He’s going to get a lot stronger. In my opinion, most sprinters don’t get their prime until 24, 25 years old. He’s only 18.”

As a freshman, Bromell won the NCAA 100m title in 9.97 seconds, becoming the first teenager to break 10 seconds with legal wind (and still the only one to do so). As a sophomore, Bromell clocked 9.84, a time faster than anything Carl Lewis ever recorded.

Later that summer, Bromell shared 100m bronze with Canadian Andre De Grasse at the world championships, behind Usain Bolt and Justin Gatlin, becoming the second-youngest medalist in that event’s history. He turned professional, signing a contract with New Balance, which he said is still in place today.

In March 2016, Bromell won the world indoor 60m title (Bolt, Gatlin and De Grasse were absent). His coach at Baylor, Mike Ford, still calls it the best Bromell race he’s seen in person. The Olympics were five months away.

In Bromell’s first top-level meet of the spring, he led a 200m in Rome coming off the turn. Then he slowed down considerably and finished seventh.

Three days later, he felt left heel pain while warming up at a Diamond League meet in Birmingham, Great Britain. He withdrew and flew back to Texas.

An X-ray revealed a bone spur growing near his Achilles. The Olympic Trials were in four weeks. They had to modify training and hope to minimize the pain, putting off potential surgery until after Rio.

Bromell made the Olympic team, placing second at Trials to Gatlin in 9.84 seconds. He trained for Rio in a pool and on an anti-gravity treadmill. When he sprinted, it was often on grass and not in spikes.

Ford felt it was a victory that Bromell even qualified for the Olympic final, where he finished last in 10.06 seconds.

“I wasn’t going to run,” Bromell said. “I was telling myself that I was just in too much pain.”

Five nights later, Bromell lined up against Bolt for the anchor leg of the 4x100m relay. He felt no pain.

As Tyson Gay neared with the baton, a dashing Bromell turned his head back for a moment to ensure the handoff. Bolt, in the adjacent lane, opened a slight lead and extended it down the straightaway.

Bromell, in dipping to try to edge Japan’s Asuka Cambridge for silver, stumbled and tumbled on the blue track. As Bolt made the final decelerating pose of his Olympic career, Bromell’s loose orange baton flew in the background.

As Bromell tried to catch himself hitting the ground, the heel pain returned. He couldn’t walk off the track. Officials brought out a wheelchair. Bromell departed believing his anchor secured the bronze medal.

Minutes later, he left a medical room on crutches and was told the team was disqualified. Mike Rodgers and Justin Gatlin exchanged the baton out of the zone.

“I gave everything that I could, almost just throwing myself just to try to get the medal, then it was just like, dang, we got DQed,” Bromell said. “I just couldn’t win in the situation. I got hurt going into the Olympics, then I couldn’t really perform how I wanted to in the 100m and then this. I’m taking an L after L after L right now.”

He underwent the post-Olympic surgery. Bromell was in a boot for two months. He said he did no rehab exercises for six months, per doctor’s instructions. Scar tissue built up. He went 10 months between races and, in his return, was eliminated in the first round at the 2017 USATF Outdoor Championships. Bromell didn’t feel right and had the heel re-examined.

I don’t see how you can run 10.2, a new doctor told him. Your tendon should have torn off the bone.

Bromell underwent another surgery and started over again. This time, he went two years between races. On July 6, 2019, Bromell took a misstep about 70 meters into a 100m heat in Montverde and eased up, clocking 10.54 seconds.

Ford feared it was the Achilles, but Bromell taped up the foot and lined up for his final. Halfway through that race, he blew an adductor muscle in his upper leg. Bromell returned to his hotel and spoke with Ford.

“I thought he may quit,” said Ford, who had coached Bromell for nearly four years.

Bromell stayed in Florida to consider his next move. Ford flew back to Texas. They decided a change was best. Bromell spoke with Reider, who developed a knack for helping athletes return from leg injuries.

Christian Taylor, the 2012 Olympic triple jump champion, switched takeoff legs after knee pain and repeated as gold medalist in Rio. De Grasse joined Reider’s group in November 2018 after a pair of season-ending right hamstring injuries. In 2019, the Canadian earned 100m bronze and 200m silver at the world championships.

“[Bromell’s] expectations were just to be like he was before, at some point,” Reider said. “The expectations for me were just to get him to a point where we could see if we could actually train. When we got in, there were some basic functions he couldn’t do.”

Bromell did what Reider called rudimentary strength and conditioning exercises those first months. He began sprinting in earnest in March.

That Independence Day race — the 10.04 — was his first in four years without pain, Reider said. Neither Ford nor Reider was surprised by that time or the 9.90 on July 24.

“We made some steps to be able to be an athlete and not a rehab project,” Reider said. “I think he can run faster than he’s ever run.”

Bromell lives by himself in Jacksonville. He has other passions, notably photography.

He sees a counselor regularly after a difficult stretch of years. He emerged from what he called “situations I probably shouldn’t have been in.” He plans to reveal specifics later.

“I stopped doing a lot of things in my life that was destroying me,” he said. “I stopped having pain and hurt in my heart and having it consume me. … I started reading my Bible more. I started reading books more. A lot of things that helped me evolve as a human. To have more peace, live properly and not destroy myself from within.”

Bromell doesn’t know where his 2015 or 2016 World Championships medals are. He doesn’t assign as much value to them as he does three-page essays that he received from college fund applicants in 2018. He promised $10,000 each to five students, choosing the recipients based on their submitted life stories.

“There’s people out here that were literally writing in their essays, Tray, your fighting, your drive to not give up helped me to not commit suicide tomorrow,” Bromell said. “Imagine reading something like that. Who would’ve thought this little kid from south side St. Pete could have an impact just by running 100 meters. That’s my gold medal.”

MORE: Usain Bolt would unretire if one man called

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Brian Orser reveals Hanyu’s, Medvedeva’s, and Brown’s Grand Prix plans

Yuzuru Hanyu
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Over the past decade, the Toronto club where Brian Orser coached South Korea’s Yuna Kim to the 2010 Olympic title has become such an attraction for top figure skaters from around the globe that it could add a word to a name that already is a mouthful.

You could call it the Toronto International Cricket Skating and Curling Club.

But its reach now is limited by the deadly virus pandemic that has effectively frozen out the elite athletes from Japan, Russia, South Korea and Poland who train at the Cricket Club.

That situation won’t change quickly, even with the International Skating Union having announced Monday its plans to proceed with a live format for the international Grand Prix Series. This fall, it will become a series of six essentially domestic competitions scheduled to begin with Skate America Oct. 23-25 in Las Vegas.

If they take place.

“As soon as the skaters can come back, it will be full steam ahead… to where, we don’t know,” Orser said via telephone Wednesday.

Two-time Olympic champion Yuzuru Hanyu remains in Japan. Two-time world champion Yevgenia Medvedeva is in Russia, four-time national champion Cha Jun-Hwan in South Korea, and two-time national champion Yekaterina Kurakova in Poland.

“We would like for them all to come back, but with the Canadian travel restrictions in place until at least Aug. 21, we can’t guarantee approval to get them in, and they would have a 14-day quarantine here if they do get in,” Tracy Wilson, who coaches with Orser, said via telephone Wednesday. “Right now, they are all training at home, and that’s OK.

“The situation is different for each one. The Japanese federation may need Yuzu to do the Grand Prix in Japan, and at this point he would face quarantine entering Canada and returning to Japan.

“For Yevgenia, as soon as she does the Russian test skates (scheduled for early September), we will re-evaluate her situation.”

Orser said he has been doing three video coaching sessions a week with Medvedeva, with whom he is in his third season as coach. Medvedeva, who left Russia for Canada after winning a silver medal at the 2018 Olympics, also is currently getting help from coach Elena Buyanova at the CSKA rink in Moscow.

“She (Medvedeva) looks way ahead of where she was at this point last year,” Orser said.

MORE: Looking back at Yuna Kim’s 10-year gold medal anniversary

Orser also has been having live remote sessions with Cha and Kurakova, and they are also sending videos to him. The only skater he has not seen is Hanyu.

“That’s normal when he is back in Japan,” Orser said. “I wasn’t expecting anything.”

How long Hanyu stays in Japan may depend on travel restrictions being loosened in both his homeland and Canada.

“I would like to get them all back, and they need to come back,” Orser said. “But facing a double quarantine is not in anyone’s best interest.”

Only two of the Cricket Club’s international skaters, 2014 Olympian Jason Brown of suburban Chicago and Yi Zhu of Los Angeles (who represents China), have come back to Toronto after leaving in late winter.

It took Brown two tries to get back across the border because of issues with the paperwork necessary for Canada to consider it essential he be allowed to enter. Orser and Wilson want to be sure any skaters coming from Asia and Europe are admitted on the first try.

From April to July, until skaters could get back on the ice in their various homelands, Brown led Thursday off-ice fitness classes via Zoom, with Medvedeva, Cha and Kurakova taking part.

“It was such a fun way to stay connected and still ‘train’ together while we were oceans apart,” Brown said in a Wednesday text message.

Orser and Wilson will recommend that all the foreign skaters training at the Cricket Club try to compete at Skate Canada, scheduled the last weekend of October at a 9,500-seat arena in Ottawa. Wilson thought if the event cannot have spectators, it might be moved to a smaller facility, possibly in a different city.

“All plans are in the early stages,” Skate Canada spokesperson Emma Bowie said in an email.

Grand Prix assignments have not yet been made.

Whether Brown picks Skate Canada over Skate America – if he gets a choice – could depend on when (and if) the Canadian government shortens quarantine periods for travelers from the United States.

“I know that we are in such unprecedented and uncertain times, so I love seeing the ISU being creative and trying to find a way to hold skating events this year,” Brown wrote. “While a lot can happen before October, if it’s safe to do so, I’ll be ready and eager to take part in any events that I can.”

The ISU said it wants to have the Grand Prix Final in Beijing, whether it takes place on its original dates (Dec. 10-13) or early in 2021. The competition is to be used as a test event of the skating venue for the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing.

There are no details yet on qualification for the final, which usually is determined by points for placements at the six “regular season” events of the series, held in the U.S., Canada, China, France, Russia and Japan. The top six in each of the sport’s four disciplines make the Final.

In the past, the highest-ranked skaters could compete in up to two Grand Prix events, but ISU Vice-President Alexander Lakernik of Russia said in a Tuesday email that everyone would be limited to one event this year.

Because the Final presumably would have much more of an international field than the six other events, staging it is infinitely more problematic because of travel involved.

“We want what’s best for the sport,” Wilson said. “We have to get these kids out there doing programs, to get them on TV. [Note: An NBC spokesman said the network would, as planned, provide coverage of the Grand Prix, with details forthcoming.] In terms of competition, we’re up for anything.

“For me, though, with all the restrictions, there is no way they will be able to run a fair qualification for the Grand Prix Final. You’ve got to reinvent yourself and make it something else – if you are able to have it at all.”

Philip Hersh, who has covered figure skating at the last 11 Winter Olympics, is a special contributor to NBCSports.com/figure-skating.

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